6 year old wants to do past life regression

Discussion in 'Children's Past Lives -Age 7 & under' started by Bowcarm, Mar 18, 2018.

  1. Bowcarm

    Bowcarm New Member

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    My son has said to me a few times he feels old (he's only 6) and that he has been here before. He doesn't embellish on it and doesn't remember anything. I have always felt he is an old soul as he is so wise beyond his year and has such integrity for a 6 year old. I spoke to him about Past Life Regression and he is so keen to do it. Is this something I should be delving into for him?
     
  2. CanSol

    CanSol Senior Member

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    I had memories from atleast one of my past lives for as long as I can remember this one, I was military in basically all of my lives so probably don't have to explain much other than those memories were of war
    The fact that your son has no memories up to now could be a blessing, depending on what he went through on his previous lives
    He could've lived in peace but he could also witnessed/committed unspeakable things that you rather not bring to the surface, that's what you as parent have to keep in mind
    IF your son does a regression, given his age experienced guidance should be used for safety, and he uncovers memories that he rather not have faced how will you handle that and help him through it?
    Even a flash of a combat scene can be traumatizing to a young child

    Having said that, there are some indicators of when he might've lived and/or what he did
    Interests in one or more time periods, topic of interests, unthought skills are all clues
     
  3. SeaAndSky

    SeaAndSky Senior Registered

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    Hi Bowcarm,

    I'd really suggest that you read Carol Bowman's books, especially her first. The first involves her use of regression in helping herself and her children overcome past life issues/trauma as well as some regression that was exploratory, but non-threatening. My general sense is that one should not do things that might raise an issue that the child is not old enough to deal with (as also suggested by CanSol). (This is the old "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" philosophy). However, if there is already an issue manifesting, then you may have no choice but to deal with it. So, what does that leave you with if there are no issues manifesting? A non-threatening experience that would be horizon expanding might be something to consider.

    In this regard, I suppose a regression directed towards a "happy" past life could be done, and you might ask a regressionist about whether it could be limited in this way, seeking only good and affirmative experiences. However, overall, I'm a bit leery of starting out so young. I tend to think that a 6 year old may just need to enjoy being 6 here and now for a while, but maybe that's just me.

    Cordially,
    S&S
     
  4. John Tat

    John Tat Senior Registered

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    Hi Bowcarm.. Its well document on this forum about a previous life I remembered as a young child.. As I have said before and I will repeat myself.. leave him alone never and I mean never bring the topic up with him.. Its obviously not a problem right now so do not turn it into a problem.. I would have strongly urged you not to have mentioned anything about a regression.. different to many who only have theories I remember what its like..

    Regards
     
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  5. fireflydancing

    fireflydancing just a fly in the sky Staff Member Super Moderator

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    If there is no need, no panic or trauma to be healed, I wouldn't do this with my child just for fun.
    On the other hand, my son did actually go to a regression therapist at the age of 8. It is not harmful or traumatic. A therapist is a professional. My son enjoyed telling the stories he saw behind his eyelids. He was given exercises to leave everything behind and so it was.
     
  6. fireflydancing

    fireflydancing just a fly in the sky Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Yes, but not necessary. Unfinished business is usually the trauma.
    My young son gave a report of a battlefield in which he died, but he was still proud and happy about his role in it. He watched and judged it with the eyes of his former persona. After the session, his obsession with guns and the military vanished gradually.
     
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  7. CanSol

    CanSol Senior Member

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    Yes but there already was something there, which is why I asked about the kid's interests
    IF there's nothing and then during a regression combat scenes appear it can lead to major issues
    I'm not saying that's the case, I only brought it up because it is something that needs to be taken into account considering that the mind does what it wants and less than happy memories can surface
    It's the better safe than sorry method
     
  8. fireflydancing

    fireflydancing just a fly in the sky Staff Member Super Moderator

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    I agree with you. As a general rule.

    And for @John Tat:

    Now the what if:
    What if a child gets confronted with a traumatic image or memory? Do you know how to deal with it?
    I think most people who try to avoid those emotions in children, don't know how to deal with it themselves.
    The way they handle those kids is a reflection of their own maturity in this field.

    Although I am not a fan of digging into a child, no, absolutely not. But the second worst thing to do is walking away from a kid with questions and odd feelings. To tell them there is nothing but imagination. And I am not only talking about reincarnation but about other paranormal experiences as well.
     
  9. Angie Brown

    Angie Brown Senior Registered

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    I agree. A natural spontaneous memory is one thing, when a parent or elder can reasure a child "It's ok. You're with me now. You are safe". For one of mine when he was a toddler, that was enough. He is in his thirties now, and a couple of years ago I asked him if he has any pl memories and he hasn't, so that's fine.

    My father would listen when I mentioned bits and pieces I remembered, and told me of a pl memory he had. He wisely never delved and asked questions that could have opened Pandora's box for me.

    I quite agree with you, at least where children and youngsters are concerned. I figure we mostly naturally recall what we really need to anyway. Best to not be too curious and particularly about young'uns.

    Best wishes,

    Angie
     
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  10. baro-san

    baro-san Senior Member

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    My first thought while reading your post was that a 6 years old is too young to have a wish and a saying in such matters, and that was unnecessarily exposed to matters beyond his comprehension.

    Hypnosis opens a path to the subconscious, and can willingly or inadvertently plant suggestions there. I believe that the benefit of satisfying your curiosity weighs less against the risk of possible trauma for your child.
     
  11. KenJ

    KenJ Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    I feel compelled to clarify something about hypnosis - it is simply "focused attention", not some strange and powerful thing that you need to be concerned about. Each of us are "hypnotized" often, maybe even several times each day. The misuse of that focused attention by someone may be damaging, but hypnosis itself is not.

    The common experience of driving your vehicle and not remembering traveling over a particular section of road that you were just on is an example of self-hypnosis where you functioned normally as the driver yet you were probably "hypnotized" during that part of your travel.
     
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  12. baro-san

    baro-san Senior Member

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    Let's just say that we have different opinions about what hypnosis is, due to our different experiences and belief systems :)

    From wikipedia:

    Conscious and unconscious mind
    Some hypnotists view suggestion as a form of communication that is directed primarily to the subject's conscious mind,[40] whereas others view it as a means of communicating with the "unconscious" or "subconscious" mind.[40][41] These concepts were introduced into hypnotism at the end of the 19th century by Sigmund Freud and Pierre Janet. Sigmund Freud's psychoanalytic theory describes conscious thoughts as being at the surface of the mind and unconscious processes as being deeper in the mind.[42] Braid, Bernheim, and other Victorian pioneers of hypnotism did not refer to the unconscious mind but saw hypnotic suggestions as being addressed to the subject's conscious mind. Indeed, Braid actually defines hypnotism as focused (conscious) attention upon a dominant idea (or suggestion). Different views regarding the nature of the mind have led to different conceptions of suggestion. Hypnotists who believe that responses are mediated primarily by an "unconscious mind", like Milton Erickson, make use of indirect suggestions such as metaphors or stories whose intended meaning may be concealed from the subject's conscious mind. The concept of subliminal suggestion depends upon this view of the mind. By contrast, hypnotists who believe that responses to suggestion are primarily mediated by the conscious mind, such as Theodore Barber and Nicholas Spanos, have tended to make more use of direct verbal suggestions and instructions.
     
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  13. KenJ

    KenJ Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    I guess I should have stated that I've had a bit of training in hypnosis and used it in therapy, but that was a long time ago.

    Edit: I might add that I studied and trained in "Erickson" hypnosis as well as others for a decade or so.

    I don't want to hijack this thread, but I ran into something I wanted to add about the simplest forms and how common they are.
    Here are some letters that I'd like you to pronounce as a word Y~E~S
    Now lets add a letter and do it again E~Y~E~S

    It may have worked better if I had spoken it rather than written it, but the point is that once your attention was drawn to yes, adding the e is likely to lead you to try to pronounce eyes as e-yes.
    Another variation can be produced with confusion, If someone asks you a question about something (other than time) and you glance at your watch and look them in the eyes and tell them the exact time and walk away, they might still be where they were for several seconds trying to refocus on reality.
     

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