A gypsy wedding

Discussion in 'Member's Memories - Archive' started by Allerleirauh, Mar 24, 2009.

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  1. Allerleirauh

    Allerleirauh The Constant Companion

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    In my memory, I was a 12 year old boy and the year that came to mind was 1905. The recording had me look at my reflection and I looked in a pond or lake. I had curly, black, medium length hair and dark skin. I remember wanting to laugh and hit the water, but I didn't because I wanted to see what I looked like. I had a father, mother, and an older sister I felt very close to. We were in/near a grove of some sort, and it was hard to see because it was dark out, but there were a lot of smaller bonfires and one huge one. I saw a lot of trees nearby, but not by the big fire. I could see a lot of wagons in the firelight, some brightly colored and some not. I remember seeing one red one that stood out to me. I think it was my sister's wedding and everyone was dancing and my father was fiddling with a few other men. I remember being very happy and also very happy for my sister. (I feel like her name started with a V, it almost seemed Russian to me. My name was Jakoba, pronounced Yahkoba.) I was watching her dance and I saw one of my friends, another boy. He had a terrible harelip. I remember wondering what it was like to lick my lips with a harelip like that and wanting to poke it. :p

    The next thing that came up was my death. I was in the woods and it was daytime out, the sun was out and it was warm. All I remember is somehow being shot in the stomach and being in a lot of pain. No one was there and I felt so sad that I wouldn't see my sister again. I wanted to cry (my actual self) and I could see myself curled up on the ground, holding my stomach and groaning in agony.

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  2. Allerleirauh

    Allerleirauh The Constant Companion

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    The reason I thought it was my sister's wedding is that after a while, a group of people grabbed my sister and carried her and another man over to a wagon. There was a lot of laughing a fake shouts of protest from my sister and the other man. They pretty much shoved them in the wagon and all stood around it. I knew they were going to have sex, and I found the thought hilarious. I wasn't allowed near the wagon, though I could hear what was going on. There was much laughter coming from the group of men (they were all men) by the wagon. When I still think about it, I want to laugh, I think it's so funny. :-D


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  3. Allerleirauh

    Allerleirauh The Constant Companion

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    Anyway, I've done some research, but am not finding much. Like Alexnovo, I've found that Roma did in fact take names from many cultures and kind of gave them a twist. They had a lot of Russian and Romanian. Many gypsies lived in Eastern Europe and they were very pursecuted throughout Europe. Also, there are very few reliable records on population of Romani. True nomadic Roma saw a decline beginning in the early 1900's and many of them started to kind of settle down, but still travel.


    1905. Alfred Dillmann's Zigeuner-Buch appears in Germany. This consists of three parts; an introduction which presents the arguments for controlling Roma, a register, 310 pages long, of over 5,000 Roma, including name, date and place of birth, genealogy and kinship, criminal record and so on, and lastly a collection of photographs of Roma and Sinti from various police files. The introduction maintains that the German people are "suffering" from a "plague" of Roma, that they are "a pest against which society must unflaggingly defend itself," and that they "must be controlled by the police most severely," being "ruthlessly punished" when necessary. The notion of the particular dangers of mixed Romani and white individuals, whom Dillmann considers to constitute almost the entire Roma population, resurfaces in the Nuremburg Laws in 1935. These racially-motivated statements also support the Zigeuner-Buch's emphasis on the Romani genetic tendency toward criminal behavior.


    If I could find a copy of this register, maybe I could find me!


    The only thing that confuses me is that the name Jakoba is femanine. It's the Hebrew female version of Jakob. That's the only thing I've found on that though.


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  4. Allerleirauh

    Allerleirauh The Constant Companion

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    I found out something about the name Jakoba! I was talking to a friend who speaks Russian and he said that yes, Jakob is the masculine form, but Jakoba could be diminutive and could be used as a nickname. This would make sense since the context I heard it in the regression was my mother yelling. :p


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  5. Allerleirauh

    Allerleirauh The Constant Companion

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    Anyway, in my regression, I had seen an extremely ornately carved wooden door. It wasn't really connected to anything, it was the part of the regression where I was supposed to picture a door of an important color and then you walk through it into the memory. Well, the one I had pictured was dark brown stain, kind of heavy, and full of carvings all over. I was fingering it, just feeling it. I wanted to stay and see what was carved on it, but the recording prompted me to walk through it, so I did. Well in what I've found, most turn of the century Romani wagons were heavily carved as apposed to painted as I thought. It turns out the painted ones became popular later. I don't know for sure, but perhaps the one I had pictured was the one from my wagon? Who knows!


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  6. Allerleirauh

    Allerleirauh The Constant Companion

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    Well, I haven't had any more memories come up in a PL regression, but I fouond some more information about romani weddings.


    The informal, joyous festivities celebrating the marriage can go on for several days. A huge feast is served on these happy occasions. There is sometimes an open fire over which whole pigs, sides of beef, game, chicken, or goose are roasted. If it is available, hedgehog may be served, although this traditional dish has fallen from favor in recent times. There might be huge platters of fried potatoes and boiled cabbage stuffed with rice and chopped meat, with herbs and garlic. Drink, too, is served as generously. Musicians play traditional rhythmic tunes and there are songs and dances.


    I also found out that it is common for the groom and his friends to "abduct" the bride from her unmarried friends. Perhaps that's what I had seen when my sister and her husband were carried off?


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