American Civil War PL Notes and Memories....

Discussion in 'Past Life Memories' started by Eva1942, Aug 3, 2019.

  1. Eva1942

    Eva1942 A Walking Enigma..

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    Recently, I watched for the second time the movie ‘Gettysburg’. I was a Confederate soldier from either Virginia or North Carolina. I made some notes during the film, and thought they would be of interest to others who had American Civil War PL’s around the Battle of Gettysburg.

    These are very rough notes. Because I wrote them so briefly, even re reading them, I wonder what it was I was trying to record with some of them o_O

    Gettysburg film..


    - Fireworks. During the battle, firework artillery were used. In this lifetime I don’t like fireworks. Could stem from this or perhaps another time.

    - Horses. Cavalry.

    - General Pickett was from Northern Virginia. His photograph at the beginning seemed to do something for me.

    - Short handlebars moustache. It’s how I saw myself in that after war memory. Long face, short handlebars moustache and weary looking.

    - Cemetery Ridge. Why is it “familiar”? (am I confusing it with Semitary Ridge, the HQ of the Confederates? (Further research shows I was indeed getting them both confused).

    - Still consider Union Army of the Potomac the ‘enemy’ and those ‘Yankees’.

    - I “feel” that I wasn’t an officer. That the light blue coats were reserved for officers only. The coat I saw in my memory was dark like a brown colour. Could it have been one I picked up from somewhere? But then again they are familiar.

    - Morning of the second day (of battle). I feel very nostalgic and like I was ready for anything.

    - I “feel” as if perhaps I was from the south. Something about the battlecries of North Virginia etc make me feel proud.

    - At the start of the second day, Pickett was still as the movie mentioned a ‘ full days march’ frim Gettysburg.

    - Bayonets and cowboy hats. In Australia they are called an akubra. I’d rather wear nothing than one of those.

    - Watching the battle I feel so very proud. The confederate flag. Also feel I was a crack shot too.

    - The long rifle I had seen on my back (in a previous memory of me being injured) must have been a musket. I know it had a long barrel and extended over top of my shoulder. I know I wasn’t short, about medium height say about 5ft 6-7 .

    - Scene in the forest against the Union Army brought me great joy and I started weeping. Happy tears I presume. Had a great sense of proudness. Tremendous amount of joy.

    - Forest battle does something for me. I have this “feeling” that I survived this battle by keeping my head down and staying still. Also, could this have been where I was first wounded?

    - The remaining Confederates were prisoners. Interesting. Perhaps I wasn’t in the forest?

    - The blood I had seen on my foot. Could I have been shot in the leg and the blood was all over my foot? (This note is from a previous memory I will post once I find the notes)

    Third day of battle in the film..

    - General Longstreet... why is he familiar to me?

    - Longstreet mentions two divisions “Woods” and “Mclaws(?)”. He also mentions that 50% of these divisions were wounded. Could I have been in one of these divisions? I remember being wounded twice and it could not have been both in the same day.

    - The weak point apparently was in the centre. Yet I remember Hills.

    - Pickett’s men were Virginians. Could I have been Virginian? Or North Virginian?

    - Battle at Fredricksburg? Hmm... feel rather nostalgic with that too.

    - The March/run of Confederates (onto the plains of Gettysburg) make me feel very happy and proud. Makes me feel like I was in among it or somewhere where I saw it? Also it makes me feel like that somehow something did not feel right. Unless I am mistaking this with my current perception of the film?

    This scene (the beginning of the battle) makes me feel very happy. Like we were ready for anything...

    - The confederate flag... ❤️

    - Similarities between the confederate flag and the New Zealand flag.

    - Pickett’s brigade was on the right. I know that I wasn’t in the middle, but on the side somewhere. Also the left side brigade of General Trimble and someone named Pender?

    - Pickett’s division in the back? Why does this sound somewhat familiar?

    - All the artillery going off. Made me feel well.. at peace as it were. Makes me very emotional, to the point of tears. Waiting in the forest does something to me as well..

    - They mention the Shenandoah valley again!! That name again!! ( Shenandoah make stems back to my childhood in this lifetime)

    - “For the glory of Virginia.. “

    - The March forward... battle field scene... feel a great sense of pride coming out of the forest.. want to say I was in a back row somewhere....

    - The speeches! The order to March!

    - Could I have been artillery? Or infantry? Still not sure

    - I feel as though our charge was more or less a ‘glory march’ than a battle march.. that we did it for what we felt was right...

    - The march across the field! I can see myself walking across the field!! I feel a increasing pride in marching.

    - Could my chest injury have come from climbing over the fence??

    - Pickett’s charge is starting to feel very familiar!!

    - The stone wall!! Why does that look familiar, or am I mistaking it for another stone wall?

    - I feel we fought to the death basically..

    - The order to turn the cannons is unfamiliar. So I most likely was injured before then...

    - Feel very strongly I was taken prisoner by the Potomac and that’s perhaps where I ended up? Also that the last time I saw the Confederate flag was in the battlefield.

    - I don’t remember the rest of the battle.

    - The rest of the film from the 3.5hour mark is unfamiliar. Perhaps it’s because I was most likely injured.

    There are many more notes I have made about my Civil War lifetime, I just have to find them.

    Eva x
     
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  2. Eva1942

    Eva1942 A Walking Enigma..

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    Here’s a repost of one of my posts that I had in @landsend’s Civil War Thread.

    From what these fragments show, I was a Confederate Soldier. Leaning towards Infantry but not sure. Not sure whether I was from North Carolina or Northern Virginia ( or maybe even somewhere else completely). Most likely was ( but still not sure, keeping open mind) involved in Pickett’s Charge on Gettysburg, and perhaps only saw battle on the last two days. Was injured twice, first time was minor, second time was severe.

    Have memories of what seems to be Camp Letterman Field Hospital which was just outside Gettysburg, but yet again still not sure. I know for sure it was a field hospital with tents and not anything else.

    According to my memories, I survived the Gettysburg battle and was taken prisoner of the Potomac Union Army. May have been incarcerated in Fort Delaware (had reactions to photographs of it. Apparently, I said I likened it to ‘Alcatraz’ ) and returned home to a frustrated wife. Suffered from PTSD and drank whiskey to self medicate myself. Often fell asleep in my ‘drinking chair’ according to my memories. Dwelled on the fact that my brother and best friends were killed at Gettysburg.

    That’s all I got. My starting point for research seems to be these field hospitals which is how I came across Camp Letterman. Currently watching the film ‘Gettysburg’ .

    I believe that I do not know when the Confederacy withdrew, because I seem to have memory of being on the battlefield fighting and then I woke up in a field hospital and staring at the ceiling of the tent. It was quiet around me which made me look for General Hospitals/Field Hospital still near the battlefield but some distance from them. That is how I discovered Camp Letterman. Although in saying that, I could have been at a battlefield hospital and the quietness I had heard was a break in the battle., so it may not be Camp Letterman.

    That was the time I was severely wounded, as I remember frantically feeling around for my legs, then once I realised I still had them, I realised my injuries were in the chest/abdomin area ( but then again I feel I had lasting walking difficulty). Also I remembered the 'floor' of the field hospital tent that I was in being nothing but grass.

    In my regression notes I seem to have that I noted that things were 'pure white and very clean' a validation I found in this link here about Camp Letterman:

    http://www.thomaslegion.net/camplettermangeneralhospital.html

    Eva x

    PS. To add to my “home” memories, I drew what one room of my house looked like. It’s a tough sketch but none the less how I saw it in my memories. Found some photographs from a home in North Carolina that matched my memories.
     

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  3. SeaAndSky

    SeaAndSky Senior Registered

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    Hi Eva,

    I believe I mentioned previously that I had an ancestor from South Carolina that fought for the South at Gettysburg, was wounded early in the conflict, had a leg amputated in a field hospital, and had to be left behind when the army retreated. He received good treatment in a Yankee hospital near New York, but was very poorly treated in a Northern prisoner of war camp (as were other Southerners). Some of his account of his service at Gettysburg was posted online at one point, I'll see if I can find you a link as his story is similar in some ways to your own.

    In the meantime, you may want to see whether something will jog your memory in regard to the Shenandoah River and Valley in Virginia. You can find out more about the area in Wikipedia. However, I am especially interested in your possible reaction to the song "Oh Shenandoah" which was around in various versions dating back to at least the 1850s. There are many versions available on Youtube. Here is one selected more or less at random:



    Cordially,
    S&S
     
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  4. Eva1942

    Eva1942 A Walking Enigma..

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  5. Eva1942

    Eva1942 A Walking Enigma..

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    Hi! Now I have some to reply. :)

    That would be great if you could find it for me but please don’t go to any trouble :)

    I remember being very fairly treated in the Yankee field hospital (the prediction of Camp Letterman) and everything was kept very clean and I was looked after. When I got to the POW place that’s when things went down.

    I had a listen to the song, but unfortunately, it is hard to say whether the fondness I was remembering from the childhood times in NZ or if it really was from my Civil War lifetime.

    But being honest too, there was something there. It could have been for Virginia as a whole though.

    Eva x
     
  6. BellonaStrandt

    BellonaStrandt Third Reich Doge

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    Never watched the film before but this is an interesting read. Our lives were kinda similar but also different at the same time. What we had in common is that we were both Confederate soldiers and I think that’s about it for now. As I said before, I originated from Utah and I was a third-generation Irish. My family then moved to Texas when I was 10. I feel more Texan than Virginian.

    I was called ‘James’ in that lifetime. Just like my Third Reich self, James also had a baby face and he was somewhere in his early to mid-twenties during the war. However, unlike Reinhold, James was a brunette with light brown eyes. He was also of average height, not exceeding 6ft.

    Unfortunately, I passed away before the Battle of Gettysburg. My neck caught a bullet and I died almost immediately. My friend was beside me and ended up in a rage kill. The really sad part was that at that time, my fiancée was pregnant with my baby and we planned to get married. I think it is because of this why Reinhold did not want to have children with Mel during wartime, even though I only remembered this life now. My mother also grieved a lot. She lost both her husband and her son.

    Unlike most of my lives, I was not exactly that wealthy in this life. At most, I was middle-class.

    I’m not too sure which battles I was involved in. All I know for sure is that I died before Gettysburg, and that I was part of the infantry. I was a skilled marksman and it’s thanks to this life why I desire to hold guns and use them for sport.
     
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  7. Eva1942

    Eva1942 A Walking Enigma..

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    Do you remember Fredricksburg or Sharpsburg? Those were before Gettysburg.

    If you look at the notes I made of the sketch of the room I saw of my house in my house back then, I was not wealthy so something around middle to upper class.

    I feel I was a crack shot too. Probably explains how I am kinda of good at sims, but over the years of this lifetime my aim has faltered.

    Eva x
     
  8. BellonaStrandt

    BellonaStrandt Third Reich Doge

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    My memories resemble the Battle of Sharpsburg/Antietam more but I can’t be too sure yet.

    Looking at the pictures, it seems that your Confederate self about the same as mine in terms of class.

    I have a new memory but maybe I should share it in my own thread.
     
  9. Eva1942

    Eva1942 A Walking Enigma..

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    Photographs of the house I found in Hendersonville, North Carolina that matched my memories of my own house. This house is a two storey Victorian is dated 1865 Civil War era.

    In this lifetime, I know more about North Carolina and Maryland (particularly Baltimore) more than any other state. But in no way do I think this was my house that I had in my Confederate lifetime..

    The front and front porch:
    DCBC94C5-BE03-4D40-BE0F-082AD1ED8644.jpeg

    869DF49C-7924-447F-A359-BBFD4C557CB0.jpeg

    Eva x
     
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  10. Eva1942

    Eva1942 A Walking Enigma..

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    How the hallway looked like.. only with less things... But still, the staircase was in the same position as I saw it in my memories..

    464997BE-255D-4CC0-8A8A-5420A9DD4B18.jpeg

    Eva x
     
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  11. SeaAndSky

    SeaAndSky Senior Registered

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    Hi Eva,

    I did a quick search online, and found that my Great Grandfather's memoir from the war was now available online. It can be found by searching for: REMINISCENCES OF THE CIVIL WAR, BY LIEUT. J. R. BOYLES. (It seems to be an old scanned version, for there are quite a few typos--I don't know if there are any here old enough to remember the old-fashioned line-by-line scanners we used to use, but this was typical). In any case, here is his account of being shot at Gettysburg and the aftermath. Unfortunately, he was wounded early and saw little of the battle, but his account is full of the "flavor" of the time:

    "The morning of July 1, 1863, we resume the march; soon hear artillery firing two or three miles in fronts press on, meeting prisoners, civil-
    ians. &c., at last come to a large brick dwelling on an elevation to our left, called Salem; the cannon were fired more rapidly,
    the musketry — pop, pop, pop — resembled fire in a cane-brake. We are ordered to form in line of battle on the right of the road
    and advance at double quick over fences, gardens, hedges, &c, until we get in reach of their shells; here we rest and eat, the
    fight raging in our front, shells from the enemy's guns bursting over us; now is heard the "rebel yell" on the left; soon we are
    ordered forward, advance half a mile and are halted on the brow of a hill in a skirt of undergrowth, and witness the slaughter of
    Davis 1 Mississippi Brigade, who. in an open held two or three hundred yards in front of us, instead of charging and sweeping
    the enemy, stand and are cut down like grain before the sickle. While halted here, 75 or 100 men came charging up just to our
    Left, dismounted and picked off the enemy with long range gnus over the heads of the Mississippians, who are advancing up an
    inclined plain towards the enemy. Just after crossing a branch about 40 yards from where we halted, Capt. John A. Hinnant.
    of Co. C, received a grape shot through his left leg, reeled and fell; we continued to advance some 200 yards, when they opened
    on us with grape and canister to our left, while the infantry poured leaden hail in front; I received a grape shot in my l ight
    leg below the knee, which shattered the bone into splinters, the shoe on that foot flying off some distance; within a radius of a
    yard and a half two members of my company also fell — John A. Eobertson and Jim Williamson; I could not move, but plainly
    saw what was going on; our brigade was wavering and about to fall back, when Col. Perrin, in command, still on horseback,
    with drawn sword, dashed to the front, telling the men to follow him; this action gave new life to the brigade, who charged and
    dislodged the enemy from behind a stone wall. Here I lay, bullets falling around like hail, still no infirmary or ambulance
    corps to carry me off for a length of time; finally two of them ventured up, danger over, as they thought, but had no stretcher
    to carry me; the July sun was broiling hot and I famishing for water; I directed the men to get two poles, cut my sword belt
    into strings, tie my blanket to the poles, lift me in it and carry me to the rear; the blanket sagged so much that it came near
    smothering me. On reaching the branch we had so recently crossed in all the pride of manhood, I begged the men to lay
    me down in the water to cool, and for a time my life's blood caused the water to run red — I knew that if I lived I was ruined
    forever. My friends again placed me in the blanket and went in search of our hospital: half a mile back we came to a whole
    division of our troops, stacked arms, cooking and eating, as if nothing was going on, while our poor boys were catching death
    at every step. I found a surgeon, who told me our hospital was about three miles back, not an ambulance insight; he finally
    sent me in a little wagon to wiiere our surgeons were.

    CHAPTER XX.
    My driver in the wagon was a full-fledged Irishman, from a Mississippi regiment ; he appeared very sorry for me, and when
    I groaned would say, "Poor boy, I hope we'll soon reach your hospital." We found it at last, I was lifted out and put on a
    pile of straw. I knew my leg would have to be amputated, but did not wish it done by the surgeon of our regiment, Dr. Bailey.
    I wanted Dr. Evins, the brigade surgeon to perform the operation, and, with tears streaming down my cheeks, begged him
    to do it, which he promised he would; I was given something and laid out until next afternoon — was too near dead to know
    how the night passed. The next day I was lifted upon a table, which roused me a little, chloroform was placed to my nostrils
    and I felt as if I rose up and flew away. When I next remembered anything, I was on a pile of straw on my back in a tent,
    my l ight leg gone; some parties were whispering that I was gone, no chance for me; I felt that my time had come and was
    resigned to my fate, but thought it hard. On the 3d of July 1 heard the awful cannonading between our own and the enemy's
    forces. On the morning of the 4th, Edgar Powell, of the 1st 8. C. V., brought me some nourishment, the first I had taken, and
    I began to get a little strength. Poor Edgar, after safely passing through all these scenes, recently took his own life; he was
    my friend, I shall ever revere his memory. I now learned that our army was in full retreat, and that we were left to the tender
    mercies of five or six well men of our regiment, left to nurse and dress our wounds, until the enemy should take charge of us.
    On the 5th or 6th, a body of awkward Yankee cavalry, with drawn sabres, came charging and captured us in the name of the
    United States. When I got a little better, I learned that my leg bad been amputated by the said Bailey while so drunk that
    he had to lean against the table to keep from falling: there are many living witnesses to testify to this fact: I suppose he deemed
    me a good subject to experiment on — amputated my limb twice and left me such an imperfect stump that I could never wear an
    artificial limb, but will go on crutches the balance of my life, having already been on them 25 years. We lay nearly naked
    and starved for some time before the enemy gave us any attention except to capture us; could hear the guns of our men, as
    they sullenly retreated to the Potomac, and our hearts felt sad to think of them: the days were very hot and the nights cool.
    Our covering consisted of blankets picked up on the battlefield, and so. full of lice that we could lie on our backs and see
    them almost move the covering: we became polluted — hair, beard, rags. I mention these things in order that those who
    were not there and the children who have grown up since may know what war is. and learn to cultivate peace. In the same
    tent with me was Capt. J. A. Hinnant and others of my company. D. L. Carter, Wylie Wyrick and R. K. Moses — the last
    two died of their wounds: Jim Harvey and Sam. Proctor, of Co. F: Billy Crosby, of Co. D (who died there), and others: we
    were close together, but I cant't remember all. The nurses I can think of who were left with us are Dolph Dunlap, of our
    company, and Tom Harris, of Co. F — they had a hard time, too. Poor wounded soldiers, there they lay: frequently some one
    would start to sing, when all who were able joined in, and the little camp resounded with strains of sacred music, praise to the
    great Creator: the words of a popular piece they sang was: "Joyfully, joyfully onward, we're bound for the land of bright
    spirits above, " etc. On the morning of the 17th, the Yankees began to move us away: I was placed in an ambulance and
    driven carefully over a rough turnpike to Gettysburg — if I suffered, it was not the fault of my driver, for he used the utmost
    care to keep me from jolting: good, kind-hearted soul, I hope the Lord blessed him for it. Arriving at Gettysburg, we were
    placed in box cars, and while the train was standing, sweet women, ladies from Baltimore. Sisters of Charity, had refresh-
    ments of all kinds, distributing to us poor sufferers; buckets of milk punch were passed along the train, and every poor reb
    allowed to help himself, if able — if not, kind hands lifted him up and held it to his dying lips."

    Cordially,
    S&S

    PS--His account continues, and he finds Southern sympathizers throughout the North, receiving good treatment until his wounds were healed enough to be sent to a Northern Prisoner of War Camp on Lake Erie. Here things take a turn for the worst, however, it was far, far worse in the camps where the captured enlisted men were housed.
     
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  12. Jaimie

    Jaimie Senior Member

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    This is so amazing ! Thank you for sharing !
    /Jaimie
     
  13. Eva1942

    Eva1942 A Walking Enigma..

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    Hi SeaAndSky! :)

    Oy vey, just reading that made me feel ever so happy. :oops:

    I am going to have a look at this online and read the entire thing and I will get back on you on it. It seems like a great way to try and trigger some more memories, espeically from Gettysburg.

    I've found this rather interesting book on Amazon about the history of both Union and Confederate Field Hospitals at Gettysburg. I've had a quick look through it, but am going to read it a little more thoroughly when I get a little more time. This might help you too perhaps?

    It is called: A Vast Sea of Misery: A History and Guide to the Union and Confederate Field Hospitals at Gettysburg, July 1-November 20, 1863 by Gregory Coco.

    Maryland Campaign:

    I found another book that talks about the Maryland Campaign and may give me clues as to why I remember Baltimore and Maryland a lot more than I thought. It is 3 volumes, but I have to find a place in Australia that I can access to see if they have the volumes.

    Also, I found this map, and the towns of Boonsboro, Sharpsburg and Hagerstown seems to "feel" familiar too.

    [​IMG]

    Eva x
     

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