Average past lives.

Discussion in 'Past Life Memories' started by Allahandria, May 7, 2001.

  1. mertzie

    mertzie Senior Registered

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    I love the marriage license story!

    That's wonderful, Mama!--Thanks for sharing. I am not a baker in this life. In fact, I think that maybe because it was my job then I resist pastries now. Of course I still love to eat them.;) --And I do have a special place in my heart for peaches.

    I didn't actually see that lifetime. My best friend, who is a psychic told me about it fairly recently. She said she saw me picking peaches in an orchard for the pastries I was making for my employer. She described my cottage and saw many people from my present life there . For instance, my son now was the wealthy employer and my brother now was his son. I was married to my present husband, but he died rather young. Still, I was able to support myself from the baking and raise my granddaughter (my sister now), until I died of a heart attack in my 60's.
     
  2. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    Hi Peter,

    I think you have to look at the whole picture. How many thousands of cases of children's past life memories have been documented by Carol, Ian and others?? Few - if any are rich or famous. How many new members have posted ordinary lives and they get few responses and soon leave? Let's not over look the sincere and all too soon forgotten members who come and go after a short time.

    Those that truly lived famous past lives -need not proclaim their importance - over and over - they need neither proof to know- nor confirmation from others. The rest - well - who knows. ;)
     
  3. Rod

    Rod Senior Registered

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    One of the things that tipped me off that I was having past-life dreams was the fact that they were of lives and events (in the past) that were so incredibly mundane that I realised it is not something that my imagination would create. If I were making up stories of being other people, they would be royal, or would be great scientists, political figures, etc. But one was a very average middle-class married man in the late 19th century, and the other was an upper-middle class chap who spent a lot time at the office, drove a Packard, and lived in a nice apartment in a large city in the early to mid 20th century. Neither was notable.

    While it seems disproportionate numbers of people remembering past lives claim to be famous, even this has at least two logical explanations:

    1. Some of these folks are either publicity-seeking or of questionable mental stability. This is the stereotype, but sometimes it happens. They start with knowlege of the celebrity and then put themselve into the role. Because their stories don't stand up to examination, they rarely show up on serious forums, such as this one -- they prefer taking their stories to tabloids and trash-TV.

    2. Of the serious, honest people in this field, it still makes sense that famous people would be overrepresented. This seems logical, since many past-life memories are brought to the surface by triggers. People who were once famous in prior lives would be much more likely to hear about the people they were. Imagine if you had been Winston Chruchill, and compare that to having been a blacksmith in New Jersey. In the former case reminders of your past life would be all around. In the later, very little in modern daily life would ever cause thoughts of the past live to occur.

    ...just a theory

    ...Rod
     
  4. Goldenage

    Goldenage Senior Registered

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    not so strange

    Hi Peter,
    Long time no talk.

    I have two or three observations to make. The first is that (as Kris says) natural past life recall is not so common but, famous lives mean big-time effects namely huge karmic obligations are involved. This means that errors and omissions in such lives are likely to have instigated very large disturbances. Intense disturbances create commanding influences in current lives so this means (IMHO) an increased likelihood of actually recalling the lives in question in which the trauma was instigated. Of course I do not discount pretenders screaming for public attention, but – anyway….

    I do not myself identify any public personalities that I recall because the lesson I try to present would otherwise be lost in the buzz. I do recall two lives where nothing seemed to happen except I got wounded (one mortally and one not but leaving a limp – a minor foot problem that persists as a shadow in this life also). But then these are both military or at least skirmishing situations played by a decidedly minor actor.

    I can also report that 2 of my daughters recalled non-famous lives but at an early stage so they took remedial action in this life against the errors of those lives. Now one can argue that they would have been forced into the changes they instigated by karmic pressure, but in this case they clearly and consciously selected their current careers as a result. So they are awake to what they are doing and thinking about the implications on a regular basis.

    To me it is inconceivable that there is anybody that does not have a famous past life squirreled away but actually, we only recall lives that offer pertinent lessons to this one. Why? Because these lives contain the karmic burden that we have used (been obliged to use?) to manifest ourselves on Earth in this instance. Thus famous lives that have no bearing on this life will only surface after all the lives active in promoting this life have been identified. And anyway – what possible use could they serve? There will be nothing in this life to resonate with them – or so I believe.
    :)
     
  5. Cassandra

    Cassandra Guest

    I've had a number of "famous" lives, and a number of completely normal, mundane ones. I don't tend to talk about the mundane ones as much because, well, they tend to be more boring. That's just their nature. Often I did nothing notable in them but die at a young age. Take the French girl who was one of five million burned at the stake during the Middle Ages, or the English peasant who died in childbirth like so many women did. There's the little girl who fled Fredericksburg during the War Between the States, or the teenager who was so unimportant that even her family didn't know or care when she died in a gutter. They're all important to me as making up pieces of who I am now, but I don't think most people would find them remarkable or interesting. When the lives aren't as exciting, there's less to talk about, but that doesn't mean the mundane lives aren't there, just that people probably talk less about them for obvious reasons.

    And here's another thing -- just because the life is considered famous now doesn't mean it always was. I've got a couple lives I know ended without anyone taking much notice at the time, but later on they became big deals. Or the alternative could happen -- you could've been a Princess then, but no one now remembers your name. ::shrug:: Fame is in public perception, not necessarily the reality of the situation.
     
  6. maxmeriwether

    maxmeriwether New Member

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    Exceptionally Mundane

    I've had 4 past life regressions and I must say that they were all very mundane! In one I was a healer/midwife and utterly ostrasized by my community (that is until they needed my services). In the others I was a servant in a castle in Germany, a deformed live in maid, and lastly, a victim of rape. I may not have been famous, but each of those lifetimes was just as important as the other and this one, as well.

    It's amazing how all these experiences are still playing out!

    Shea
     
  7. KarenF

    KarenF Senior Registered

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    An issue close to my heart...



    What they can do is engender self-doubt... but self-doubt, if we use it rather than let it paralyze us, spurs us to greater rigor in self-examination.

    I was lucky... in the first two years after my past lives emerged, I ran into no one else who claimed the really famous one. Subsequently I've heard of about ten or fifteen, ranging from a cult leader in Sedona who plans to rule the world after Armageddon, to a guy who somehow convinced a university department that he was the real thing, to a basement-dweller-type who based it all on one glimpse of a vision of himself standing in front of an army of the time, apparently not realizing that he could have been someone else standing in front of an army of the time. And then there's the person who wants to sue major TV and movie studios, because she believes that they steal all their ideas telepathically from her thoughts.

    There's too many of them to let them bother me, any more... except when they verbally attack me, which two of them have on no provocation other than my claim... but that proves nothing except that they are frightened by my claim and overcome by the urge to lash out. My feeling is that if I ever run into another who has more evidence than I do, or even an equally convincing amount, I'll accept that their claim seems to be strong, and question myself as to what might actually be going on in my own head, which I do anyway. That has yet to happen.

    I think evidence is the bottom line, really. Maybe it's not fair that no one's going to believe us off the bat, but, with so many spurious claims around, it's a reality we have to live with. As I mentioned in another forum, when I give the name, now, I also give the best piece of evidence -- right up front. It doesn't convince everybody, because those people who in their past lives refused to look down Galileo's telescope, so as to avoid seeing what was there, are still with us today... but I find many people are open-minded, and it gets better results, in my experience, than not offering said evidence.

    Fact is that spurious claims discredit us all. Real past life memories, of whatever degree of renown, are dismissed; the whole field is made to look like the refuge of lunatics; people struggling along their own path of self-discovery get thrown into confusion. My position now is that people shouldn't make famous past life claims unless they have amassed enough evidence to defy other explanations, and are willing to share it all, or at least the highlights.

    Having said that, I'd like to offer what I consider to be some clues as to whether a famous past life is genuine. A genuine one:

    - is remembered in a similar way, with a similar tone, to other past life memories... details, confusion, images, emotions, that interesting mix of vague and vivid you get, etc. If it sounds like it's out of a history book, it probably is.

    - has connections and relevance to the person's present life, which prove useful in spiritual growth and/or healing.

    - contains little or no sense of grandstanding, boastfulness, self-importance or one-upmanship. If someone clearly wants to be treated specially due to having had a certain past life, it's almost certainly not real.

    - is accompanied by no signs of mental illness, e.g. confused thinking, other grandiose or bizarre claims, verbal aggressiveness, social or career non-functionality, excessive negativity, etc.

    - contains memories of scenes that were not recorded by history, but fit well with it, and may provide logical answers to questions whose answers are not historically known.

    - has the firmness of certainty in memory, while at the same time the person expresses doubts... ordinary people remembering extraordinary lives doubt their memories as a matter of course, because it's natural to think, 'How can I have been that?' In other cases, their memories were suppressed in childhood, sometimes brutally, by closed-minded parents, and thus doubts are deeply ingrained. Their desire to confirm their memories comes less from a desire to impress than the drive to know the truth about themselves.

    My .02 anyway.

    This thread finally inspired me to write an article for the FAQ section that I promised Deborah oh, months ago, on exactly this question. I sent it to her privately for her perusal/approval, so it won't be up until after this one is...

    Love & peace,
    Karen
     
  8. frodo

    frodo New Member

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    I don't really have past lives as famous people at all. I've heard the cleopatra stuff and there was one that claims to be Edward Bellamy and another to be Czar Nicholas. The thing is that a lot of times they seem to be recalling things that modern history doesn't know. The Czar Nicholas guy said that he died in a different season than conventional history said at the time. conventional history later proved him right.

    But I'd bet that some of these famous PLs are fantasies plain and simple. I guess you should be sceptical until they show you something that they shouldn't know. There are flakes anywhere. :rolleyes: I don't think that means throw out the rest of the evidence.
     
  9. KarenF

    KarenF Senior Registered

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    The word "famous"

    Honor, I think you must be referring to Donald Norsic, author of To Save Russia. He's given an excellent example of what I'm talking about -- an amassing of evidence that defies any other explanation. He did an amazing job... pointed out resemblance in looks, in mannerisms, in handwriting (he had that done by graphology pros) and in personality and interests, as well as having many memories which were confirmed by obscure sources. And more, too much to summarize. I believe totally that he was Nicholas because he presents as close to an airtight case as you're going to get.

    To whomever wrote that perhaps people who remember famous lives clam up about them due to fear of ridicule: you are right. I know of four.

    I don't feel either that my past lives, or I myself, are trivialized by the word "famous." To me the word, in regard to past lives, means past lives with names that are still known by many people. That's all. I use it because it's the concept that people take issue with. They feel that those who are claiming to have been someone we've all heard of are trying to cash in on the social status of the name to enhance their own social status. And insofar as this is discernably true, their objection is absolutely justified.

    I've sweated over it myself. I don't deny that there is a part of me that would love my name to be known (in a good way) by all. (In one life I went after fairly-won fame like a bat out of hell, so maybe it's a soul trait.) So I've walked the whole gauntlet of wondering whether my own past lives are all fantasies intended to impress people. I am a tad famous in this life actually, from having published fantasy novels and it does feel very nice to have readers tell me, "I loved your books!" You feel you have connected with many people, affected their lives positively, and you can't help but be happy about it -- or at least I can't, anyway. Nor does it feel like something trivial, at least to me.

    My feeling is that those who want to be known in this life for having made a major contribution must make a major contribution in this life.

    Now if you are writing a book about a past life, as I am and I know at least one other person in this discussion is, it gets a little confusing... you wonder, am I writing this to make that contribution, or am I just trying to bask in my old glory? Fact is, writers often don't understand their own motivations and aren't consciously aware of the nature of the contribution they are making. Mostly they just trust in their muse to lead them right, and many quite purposely avoid trying to analyze it, or their motivation, in case that stops their writing cold. While I could do that with my novels (which grew out of digested past-life memories, as it turned out), I've been unable to with the famous past-life autobio, because I've been far more suspicious of my own motivation... and guess what, it stopped the writing cold. I was raised to utterly distrust and reject and despise myself for my memories and other forms of inner knowing, so, as it turns out, I have to finish getting over that before I can effectively write the book, let alone approach publishers, agents, etc. So, yes, a little more confusing.



    Love & peace,
    Karen
     
  10. Open Heart

    Open Heart Senior Registered

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    I remember mundane lives as well as more well-known ones. I remember being a young woman refugee from the Irish Potato Famine who died in childbirth in a Philadelphia slum. I remember being a Mayan sacrificial victim. I remember a crippled beggar woman in Constantinople who was killed when the Turks sacked the city. Interestingly, in my next lifetime I came back as Elizabeth of York and was known for my compassion to the poor.
     
  11. Cindy

    Cindy Guest

    Average past lives.

    Okay, I want to hear about the average past lives. I've been on this forum for a few days now and have read countless posts of individuals claiming to have prominent past lives. Why was everyone a Nazi and/or executed Jew? Why was everyone a great Roman warrior?

    What happens to the lifetimes in which you are a mechanic with 2.5 kids and a dog, you die naturally in old age, have healthy kids and grandchildren with relatively average lives, etc.? Do these people slip through the cracks somehow?

    Why is it that everyone remembers being abused, murdered, glorious? Even the most 'normal/non-famous' lives described here still have some amazing significance, like having lost all your family in a war or something of that nature.

    Even more amazing to me is how many family members reincarnate themselves back into a granchild or niece or nephew to let their mourning family members know that they are okay. Is reincarnation being used as a coping method for those grieving lost family members? Sometimes I can't help but feel that this is sometimes the case.

    Perhaps it is the skeptic in me shining through, or perhaps it is just that people choose not to elaborate or tell stories about their "average" past lives. Personally, I'd like to hear more about the average lives.

    I am more inclined to believe the past life memories of children, who seem to more often than not remember themselves as average people. It is in the adult section that I find more prominent past life figures. By prominent I do not mean celebrity/president/famous. By prominent I mean significant, exciting, mysterious, passionate, etc.

    Someone, please tell me about your life as Joe Schmoe. You had a healthy boy and a healthy girl, a loving wife and a decent home. You were not filthy rich but you weren't struggling either. You died of the average, common health problems. Where are the Joe Schmoe past lives?
     
  12. gendenwitha

    gendenwitha Senior Registered

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    Well, I think we remember the exciting times in our lives, or the tragic, but most lives I remember I was joe schmoe--actually joe schmoe had it a little bit better off than most of my lives, but here goes a short synopisis:

    Last life: happy life with three kids, loved my husband incredibly, we were pretty average except being a somewhat interracial couple in the 50's (Hispanic & Irish, but both attended same Catholic church) only thing dramatic was our deaths--in a house fire while our children were still young. But I had a lovely dream one day when I was first married about how this man and I had met and how he proposed (and woke up feeling terribly guilty for the love I felt for this person until I looked at my husband and realized it was the same man, in a different body).

    Ones before that: I remember being a civil war widow, who remmained alone, lonely and bitter until becoming involved with the women's sufferage movement in my old age and meeting my next love--who as far as anyone else could see was just another old lady who I moved in with for company. (I don't know if lesbianism falls under Joe Schmoe, but i wasn't anyone famous.)

    In a life that looked like something out of Little House on the Prairie, I was an abused wife, who with the help of friends escaped my husband only to die of smallpox shortly thereafter.

    Late 1700's early 1800's I was a child in Eastern(?) Europe, daughter of a prostitute, who left home to work at a fairly young age, then later married and moved to America. I didn't have any children, but I died healthy at an old age, the only drama in my life was this very quiet inner demon that I never was able to go back after I left home and get my younger brother who I heard was sent to an orphanage after my mother's death.

    The other ones where I seem to be just an average person are mostly snippets of past lives, not something where I remember the story of my life as those above.

    There's two reasons I would give you for people remembering signifigant lives more: One is the Titantic phenomenon--that is, anyone who was on a ship that sank anywhere near the early 1900's, assumes they were on the Titantic, because that's the only one in history they know about, then because of that, your subconcious mind that records little details you've read about in the past about the Titantic interwines those details in with your memory. A memory is nowhere near a perfect thing, even in remembering one life--just listen to two siblings discuss their chidhood!

    Two is that we remember what is signifigant to us. When asked why psychics aren't rich from the lottery, I explain that the numbers of lotteries don't make an emotional impact with us, and don't stay in our memories, so that accessing that information our "future memory" is as hard as accessing what the lottery numbers were April 12, 1994. It's like remembering things from early childhood--only the emotionally signifigant things will you remember, but if you start with a little bit of that, (like aunt Sylvia's dog that scared you) you can remember more (like the color of aunt Sylvia's couch).

    Actually there's a third reason you hear more about signifigant lives--in trying to verify our memories, we're apt to discuss the ones we can look up in history books or talk about with others who remember similar events, it isn't always that that's all we remember, so much as that's what we're prone to talk about.
     
  13. shield

    shield Registered User

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    Hi,

    Yeah, I guess there would be a certain percentage of reported PL´s that´s subconciously "made up" or at least overly dramatized. But then there´s the fact (or what I would think a fact) of the dramatic, intense lives (or parts of lives) being sharper ingrained in the consciousness and so, more likely to affect later lives and to be remembered. And also in need of spending time on and "processing".

    Plus...I think the ideal average life that you´re describing would probably really be more rare than one with at least a couple of dramatic, over-turning episodes or patterns of events. My experience is, if you stop to look at the life of almost any so called average person you´ll soon discover stuff under the surface-look of things, that´ll blow you´re mind.

    Still, if you look around the stories of average lives will be there. Perhaps not so eloquently laid out but that would only be in the nature of things, I suppose. After all, and naturally so, a boring story doesn´t lend itself to telling over and over in the way as one more colorful...:)



    (BTW, in "Children´s PL" Carol Bowman´s telling of an experiment(can´t think oft he name of the lady making it now) made where collage students were regressed to remember PL´s and how the different lives were then ordered statistcally in class of society, occupation, etc.

    And, the results did actually check out as historically correct percentagewise.
    That is, the majority remembered lives as farmers, workers, etc., a smaller part middle-class lives and not very many remembered lives as noblemen, etc. Please, see the book for exact facts.)
     
  14. musicfan259

    musicfan259 Ever falling post count

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    Cindy;

    To be honest, I have wondered the same thing.

    Uh, well I wouldn't say I was great :p :D

    It seems to me you mean average as in idyllic, so that would be my most recent life. Middle child of 3 in a 1950s style family living in a "modern" 1960s style house, all the creature comforts our parents didn't have when they were growing up. People have told me it is too idyllic. That since my current life is in such sharp contrast to that typical vision, I subconsciously want the "average" "ideal" "perfect" life. :rolleyes: Maybe so, if idyllic means dying accidentally before turning 21. I know you said long lives and natural causes but sadly, a lot of teens and 20-somethings die in accidents.

    If you want mundane, seemingly pointless, stuff then I must share the life before that, as the eldest of about 5 siblings. Ended up getting widowed (OK so it was in a war) and spent the next several decades doing basically nothing. It was actually a relief to end that existence (took sick one winter) because it was so boring.

    Reflecting over the lives I know about, your question makes sense because there's something unusual or dramatic in each one - even if it is only one notable event or aspect. You've showed me to examine them and compare them to those of other adults and those of kids. I'll admit it is likely that my "memory" is a bit distorted by my expectations, the Titantic phenomenon, etc... which is why it would have been nice to get at the memories while I was still very young. But every time I sit down and play the "what do I know is real" game I get the same result: most of it, or maybe even all of it.
     
  15. curious_girl

    curious_girl Curious Member

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    That sounds idyllic to me, I think a lot of people would like to have a life like that (past or present),
    stable and relatively happy.
    Of course such lives exist, but real life is most of all different.
    Especially when you've lived in times of war or poverty,
    and in the Middle Ages only the happy few died in old age.

    When it's about life, this one or a past one, we remember the things which were important to us,
    which affected us emotionally.
    That could be love, or death, or war, or fear, or pain.
    And some of those emotional moments aren't fun at all,
    that's why people tend to remember the tragic and dramatic things of their life.
    Especially when someone died a violent death this memory can be carried over to the next life.

    Being famous or glorious or average isn't what matters,
    but how you felt, what you've learned and where you're going.

    Curious Girl.
     
  16. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    HI Cindy,

    We are currently working on the Past Lives Archive -which contains many average life times posted on the forum in the past five years. There are 27 pages of posts in the adult section alone and many of these PL memories are buried in threads that are also many pages long.

    You said -
    Have you read Carol's book - Return from Heaven? It is filled with cases of American children who remember being a family member from before. If you study reincarnation for any length of time -what surfaces is the fact that our consciousness creates -who we are - where we are born, and the circumstances of our next life time. There are also many level to my previous statement. ;)

    When you suggest that within human history the "average person" should outweigh huge catastrophic events its hard to understand. I mean -- what do you consider average? The Great American leave it to Beaver Family? *S*S*S I kind of sounds that way in your question.

    You have to consider the events of our past -- like the holocaust -(Which over 6 million Jews were killed) and The Roman Empire - and when you consider the amount of people living during that time period and the many many years that the Empires covered -it was LIFE at that time. In that place.

    Is it really any wonder - that people remember being killed as a Jew? 6 Million Jews- that's a lot. I also cannot help but think - that when WWI and WWII happened - it was just that - a WORLD WAR -therefore - how can anyone NOT be touched by the events that happened?

    I was an average Italian woman -whose whole family was killed in WWI- but does that make my life time then -not average? Just because my family was killed? I was a black slave girl in the South during the Civil War before that. Do you consider slave life times -not average? How many slaves lived during 1650 -1867 in America. Probably millions.

    I would also like to point out - that the first memories that surface for most people are traumatic, or fearful, or laced with guilt -shame or the like. That is because the ethereal body remembers and it is that energy that needs to be brought to consciousness and healed. IMO.

    Shield - the woman's name in Carol's book is Helen Wambach, Ph.D. and her book is titled Reliving Past Lives
     
  17. frodo

    frodo New Member

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    I can't say that the lives I remember are particularly dramatic. I think that at least for me the memory was triggered by things actually happening in my present times. I think had 9/11 not happened I might not have been able to recall my samurai pl. I guess there was sort of a personal need to get in touch with that. My most average past life was being a jew in egypt around the roman times waiting for the messiah. At least from what I can tell I don't think that I found what I was looking for. I think I died pretty old for the times (although I don't know how or why). All I can remember really is looking at old scrolls with hebrew writing on them. I don't talk about it much because there really isn't much to tell.
     
  18. Szofie

    Szofie Senior Registered

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    That's intriguing Honor. I've read that in the 1st century AD, there was widespread expectation of a Messiah, who was expected to be a military leader who would throw off the yoke of Roman oppression from Jerusalem. Also I've read about the large and learned community of Jewish settlers in Egypt - in Alexandria in particular. Glad you shared that.

    Well, I've had various ideas about where I "might have been," but I'll stick with the two encounters I had with regression hypnosis. I've had no external validation for these either, but neither these nor the possible other things I'm keeping in a mental bin at the back of my mind, were in any way famous or notable.

    First one: a subsistence farmer in a hot climate in a very flat land. Seemed to be suffering from malnutrition (distended stomach), and very sort of dull-witted (perhaps also due to malnutrition). It seemed that he was proudest of having twin sons - and I got the idea that twins were somehow lucky or special - a distinction. Seemed to have died by keeling over in a drought stricken field - stroke? Heart attack? Starvation? Don't know.

    Second one: a very overweight, shy man who was employed in a menial capacity in what seemed to be a Late period or possibly Ptolemaic egyptian temple - possibly Khnum. I think he lived at home with his mother, though sometimes seemed to sleep in a small cubby-hole of a room at the temple. His mother seemed more ambitious for him than he was for himself (and seemed to be the person who got him the 'job' at the temple), but she basically gave up on him as he was pretty much a disappointment. His favorite thing was taking inventory of temple goods. He participated in malicious gossip against rivals and seemed very dependent on the institution he was attached to, and upon his mother who he also resented for pushing him. Also, it seemed he was mocked in the streets.

    There's my story and here's a grain of salt to take with it! ;)

    Szo
     
  19. KarenF

    KarenF Senior Registered

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    Famous/traumatic

    Cindy, there is a major distinction between famous past lives and dramatic events in past lives.

    Re famous lives, go to the FAQ forum and check out the topic "Why does everyone claim to have a famous past life?" I wrote the article, and I think you'll find some possible answers to your question in it. It's an uncomfortable reality for many people interested in reincarnation, but fact is, some people who claim famous past lives are simply deluded.

    As far as dramatic events go, people tend to be more likely to remember those aspects of their past lives that have left an emotional residue -- same as within this life. E.g., probably few here remember where they were on the morning of Sept. 15, 2000. But I'm sure we all remember exactly where we were on the morning of Sept. 11, 2001. Traumatic events leave strong residues, which can remain with the soul even across lives, and in some cases need therapy so as to correct resulting phobias, obsessions or other problems.

    I think children tend to remember more mundane events that adults because they simply remember more events more easily than adults, so the traumatic ones just become part of the mix. As they get older they are likelier to retain traumatic memories than everyday ones. Regression therapy is always going to unearth traumatic memories, because such events produce the problems that people to go to regression therapists to solve.

    I can't imagine there is anyone who has lived a series of lives who hasn't had something traumatic happen in at least one of them...

    Love & peace,
    Karen
     
  20. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    HI Cindy,

    I am curious -- what you think of the replies you have received in this thread? You made some really interesting and thoughtful points and you received some really good thoughts about them from others. What are your thoughts now?
     

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