Covid19 Thread 2 (Prayers, compassion, and reflection)

Discussion in 'Members Lounge' started by Tinkerman, May 20, 2020.

  1. Tinkerman

    Tinkerman Administrator Staff Member Super Moderator

    Joined:
    May 24, 2004
    Messages:
    687
    Likes Received:
    477
    Location:
    The Plains USA
    As the Covid19 virus changes the world in such epic and catastrophic ways the staff of the forum wishes to have a place where reflection and prayerful discourse can take place. It must remain constructive and non-divisive. No politics, none.

    Covid19 Thread 1 is closed but viewable. It went on for 20 pages. Thank you to SeaAndSky for the original posting.

    On a personal note, I live on a very remote ranch in the middle of the American prairie. Sheltering in place is a regular part of my existence; there are no other people for miles in every direction. So I sit back and watch the world from a distance. But it can be a scary thing out here too; in the nearest town (pop.200) there were two cases of the virus. When you put a name, and a face to the disease, especially in our closed/remote community it becomes very real. I cannot imagine the heartache and scale of the virus in places like New York. The emotional and physical toll is unimaginable.

    What do we do? What do you do? Personally, as a Buddhist/Seeker, I delve deep into meditation as a daily practice. Reflection into the numinous and spiritual realm, for me, is powerful. The other night the Dalai Lama spoke live to the world; he talked about how we are all one people, one common life, with a common home--earth. He said the only way these catastrophes can be solved is by compassion. He emphasized that every major religion has at its core belief: love and compassion. And, if the world would practice such... it would heal the earth and all society.

    The staff of the forum would like to thank all of those who help keep the wheels of society turning... doctors, nurses, grocery suppliers and store clerks, police, fire, and civic workers, etc... THANK YOU.

    And thank you to the members here for their compassionate and friendly discourse on this subject.

    Tinkerman
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2020
  2. SeaAndSky

    SeaAndSky Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2014
    Messages:
    1,361
    Likes Received:
    1,112
    Location:
    Florida, USA
    Hi Tinkerman,

    I "liked" your post, and actually do LIKE your post. At a different time I might take tiny issue with one "non-political" statement. But, in the interest of not throwing monkey wrenches in the gears for awhile, I will put a sock in it. I'm sure it will come up again sometime anyhow.

    Cordially,
    S&S

    PS--I previously mentioned putting up additional content, but I don't think the fairly "light weight" subject I was going to interject has any place following immediately after your very deep and heartfelt post. I'll let some others post for a while so that the contrast between depth and topical shallowness won't be quite so grating. :cool:
     
    SeekerOfKnowledge and Tinkerman like this.
  3. Cyrus

    Cyrus Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2018
    Messages:
    252
    Likes Received:
    185
    Location:
    Spain
    Covid19 in Barcelona (Spain) these days:

     
    tanker and fireflydancing like this.
  4. tanker

    tanker Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2018
    Messages:
    696
    Likes Received:
    919
    Location:
    England
    Seeing so many of these old cities empty is a chance to notice how beautiful some of them are. When they're crowded, it's easy not to notice their fine architecture, as we tend to look more at people. I particularly love to see Venice now it's empty, and I imagine some of the residents there are happy to reclaim their city for a while. In my own street, it's been lovely not to have constant traffic, and everything looks that much greener without all the pollution. But soon it'll be a distant memory, and another generation won't even know the clear blue skies we're seeing for a while now.
     
  5. Cyrus

    Cyrus Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2018
    Messages:
    252
    Likes Received:
    185
    Location:
    Spain
    Covid19 - Aircraft carrier Cavour abandons the Taranto internal bay (Mare Piccolo, South Italy) to enter the Ionian Sea:

     
    Last edited: May 23, 2020
    tanker likes this.
  6. There and back again

    There and back again Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2018
    Messages:
    403
    Likes Received:
    334
  7. Speedwell

    Speedwell Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2018
    Messages:
    428
    Likes Received:
    563
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    Can't tell what that link was supposed to be, I only get,

    Sorry, that page doesn’t exist!​
     
  8. inhaltslos

    inhaltslos Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2010
    Messages:
    594
    Likes Received:
    357
    Works for me. This is it:
     

    Attached Files:

    Speedwell likes this.
  9. Cyrus

    Cyrus Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2018
    Messages:
    252
    Likes Received:
    185
    Location:
    Spain
    This donkey hasn't seen his master for a couple of months due to confinamiento (lockdown):

     
    fireflydancing, Tinkerman and tanker like this.
  10. cloud potato

    cloud potato Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2013
    Messages:
    231
    Likes Received:
    215
    fortunately where i live business's are opening up and i got to share a dine-in experience with close friends. a friend thanked me with relief that we could do something as simple as go out and congregate. even the unsavory moments become something to appreciate. my prayers go out to those who may be confined or hurting because of over the top government mandates.
     
    tanker likes this.
  11. tanker

    tanker Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2018
    Messages:
    696
    Likes Received:
    919
    Location:
    England
    I can't even blame the government for my confinement! It's voluntary due to my bad chest, and is likely to last for many more months. I could sure do with some prayers, thank you.
     
  12. cloud potato

    cloud potato Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2013
    Messages:
    231
    Likes Received:
    215
    tanker, you got it. a speedy recovery for you. :) i believe my friend is in better mental health for fleeing nyc. about your chest, is it respiratory? swami has recommended HOCL hypochlorous acid and bee propolis if so(maybe oral or spay form). now is crucial to share the prayer of wellness and goodness for all.
     
    tanker likes this.
  13. Tinkerman

    Tinkerman Administrator Staff Member Super Moderator

    Joined:
    May 24, 2004
    Messages:
    687
    Likes Received:
    477
    Location:
    The Plains USA
    "To share the wellness and goodness for all," yes, I think this should be our primary directive. It is easy to blame everything for our trouble but in its basic form we, people, are the accelerant in this pandemic. As Pope Francis said a few weeks ago, "...this is not the first pandemic the world has faced." Our over-consumptive and indulgent society has lost track of the reality of life, and most overtly the poor. He pointed out the hypocrisy of political leaders for talking about caring about Covid19 and yet continuing to build weapons of war.

    The Dalai Lama, last weekend gave two nights of teaching on the pandemic. He too recognized society as the root of the disease. He said that we've forgotten that we are all equal beings, sentient beings... all life is valuable, including nature and the living world we occupy. He also condemned the proliferation of war. In this epic battle of nature vs. humankind, we should all know who will win; this is a good time to listen to the wisdom of nature. Nature is correcting the planet.

    In my own journey, through past lives, in particular, my life as my great grandfather, I lost my wife and two boys to the Diptheria epidemic of 1906. The resulting mental break down was a terrible trial and one that I feel even today as I stand at their graves. Yes, we've lost some freedom, and certainly, the way of life we once knew is changing, but life does go on, standing over those graves reminds me of that. So for me, right now, I want to choose a path of healing for the soul, the psyche, and nature. Blaming seems to fester the problems, aggravate the populus, and feed the hysteria of conspiracy theories. We each, in my opinion, need to live the life of our faith... whether Buddhist, Seik, Christian, Moslem, Pagan... whatever! Live the faith of spirituality that they provide. In most every belief system love is the root factor, and compassion is the tool to work it. This is what we need right now. The Dalai Lama was emphatic that all peoples and all faiths must respect each other because we are all one humanity... we are the same and we all must live on this earth, it is our common home.

    These are just a few thoughts from the prairie on a rainy morning. Blessing to each of you. Practice your faith... whatever it may be.

    ~Tman
     
  14. tanker

    tanker Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2018
    Messages:
    696
    Likes Received:
    919
    Location:
    England
    Many thanks, cloud potato!
     
  15. Cyrus

    Cyrus Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2018
    Messages:
    252
    Likes Received:
    185
    Location:
    Spain
    Lockdown ends - tourism returns:

    [...I'll take you to where the sun rises...I'll take you to where the Moon sleeps...]

     
    Last edited: May 29, 2020
    SeaAndSky likes this.
  16. SeaAndSky

    SeaAndSky Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2014
    Messages:
    1,361
    Likes Received:
    1,112
    Location:
    Florida, USA
    All:

    This post is added as relevant to the category "reflection" in the title of this thread. Proper reflection includes the question: What have we learned from the latest pandemic? I recall stating in the prior thread that Covid was still just a "dry run"--something to prepare us for the really deadly pandemics that are possible in the future. The following article will serve to reiterate that point. It also provides a lot of useful information at what should be, for the human race, a "teachable moment." Do not read it if you do not wish to have your nascent sense of security rocked:

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8370969/The-apocalyptic-killer-virus-coming-home-roost.html

    The foregoing is not provided just to depress people who were beginning to feel better about things. But if we are going to reflect, we need to reflect on what we are doing that makes pandemics possible and what we should, possibly, be doing differently. This strikes home to me because I am most definitely not a vegan. Likewise, industrial farming techniques are what makes the modern meat supply cheap and plentiful, but many of these techniques are (I hate to admit) rather cruel. Given the fact that they may also lead to large scale human deaths, it makes me think there might be a better alternative . . . .

    Cordially,
    S&S
     
    Cyrus likes this.
  17. tanker

    tanker Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2018
    Messages:
    696
    Likes Received:
    919
    Location:
    England
    S&S, I don't want to read the article, based on its title, as I've already reflected along those lines and I'm quite scared enough with what we've got! But I agree, this is a wake-up call, and a lot of people are far too casual and sometimes even complacent about Coronavirus. I hope our governments are making sensible plans for us, but have my doubts, based on events here so far.

    I'm not a vegan either, but I am very careful what I eat. I only eat organic meat that's been raised in ethically sound conditions. Plus organic eggs, vegetables and milk. This not for reasons of avoiding some apocalyptic killer, but simply because I care about innocent creatures and believe strongly that they should have a good quality of life without cruelty. (I ought to go vegan, I know, so that innocent creatures don't have to die for me to eat them at all, but I simply don't enjoy that kind of food and would probably rather starve than eat it.) I'm thinking that sooner or later we'll get something apocalyptic or other in any case, and if that's too awful to face, then there's always a way out.
     
    SeaAndSky likes this.
  18. Cyrus

    Cyrus Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2018
    Messages:
    252
    Likes Received:
    185
    Location:
    Spain
    Hi, folks:

    I had already read a similar article in I don't even remember what media nor what language. I'm not panic-stricken, but calm and sure the science will provide a solution to the problem, now that this problem has at last been well outlined.

    It's lamentable that our species has to be well scared prior to begin making the necessary steps towards a right solution.
    But this fear will, I hope, at least assure that all the necessary means (financial, human, ...) will be provided for such a solution.

    Maybe I'm just too confdent with the science and logic in general.
     
    SeaAndSky likes this.
  19. SeaAndSky

    SeaAndSky Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2014
    Messages:
    1,361
    Likes Received:
    1,112
    Location:
    Florida, USA
    Hi Cyrus,

    I'm not terrified either, but I still don't think people fully recognize the epic possibilities of the problem. It seems that people would rather worry about a large celestial impact than an epidemic.

    The difference is that the conditions that produce a celestial impact event have been present throughout history, and we know from history that an impact with global consequences is a very, very rare phenomenon. So, despite current efforts to watch the sky a bit more carefully and catalog any possible sources for such an impact, we can remain fairly sure that any impact will be (at worst) a local/regional disaster and not a world-wide catastrophe. (I'm actually more worried myself about the impact of a direct hit by a strong solar flare).

    However, the conditions that could produce a truly deadly pathogen and carry it around the world in a short period of time allowing it to kill untold millions or billions of people (before any cure or vaccine could be found) are very, very recent. Thus, our sense of security on this possibility is likely misplaced. The conditions that could produce such an event are recent enough that we haven't really been in a position to truly evaluate and plan for the danger it could pose. For example, the death rate for the recent pandemic in the U.S. has apparently been less than 1% and to date there have nonetheless been more than 100,000 deaths. That is pretty horrific, but things could be much, much worse.

    Cordially,
    S&S

    PS--I agree with your conclusion that science and logic could provide a pathway to deal with and hopefully to largely eliminate this threat. However, I'm not convinced at all that humans currently have the "willpower" to do so, or that they will have the willpower until something far worse than what we have already experienced takes place. At that point it may be too late.

    PPS--Despite my first "P.S." I'm not going to end on a negative note. The pandemic we have just experienced should be a "call to arms" on some of the issues involved. If we get busy while staying compassionate and sensible, we can do great things, so I'm definitely not giving up hope. ;)
     
    tanker and Cyrus like this.
  20. Ceridwen

    Ceridwen Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2012
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    18
    Location:
    Wales (formerly England)
    Shame I don't speak Italian in this lifetime - nice music.

    Watched a film I've been meaning to see when opportunity arose for some time - "The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society". Good film/enjoyed it. Like the scenery of Guernsey and promised myself I'd go and take a look some time for a holiday - and then remembered my experience in a holiday in Crete one time.

    I think I'd probably "struggle" with Guernsey - because of what happened to the people there in World War 2. That being now that the penny has dropped as to why I did not like Crete from the second I set foot on it for a holiday - ie I have the feeling I was one of the lepers isolated from society there - as they did I gather (first in caves on Crete, then the Spinalonga leper colony off the coast) and I couldnt handle that. Not after the 10 weeks (and who knows how much longer?) of Lockdown in Britain (the worse Welsh version at that).
     

Share This Page