Do you approve of cremation?

Discussion in 'Reincarnation, Religion and Spirituality' started by Sarellah, Jan 19, 2014.

  1. MaritaMari

    MaritaMari Senior Registered

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    The Addams Family house.... mmm, me like it :D
     
  2. Mama2HRB

    Mama2HRB Senior member Staff Member

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    This actually happened to a young girl in my family. We thought it was my Grandmother's sister but after research we found it was her cousin but they considered each other sisters.


    NOT GOOD.
     
  3. Sister Grey

    Sister Grey Senior Registered

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    Although I'm rather partial to the notion of having a nice traditional funeral with good classical music and an expensive coffin, fact is I don't have a family or community to attend it. Best I could hope for would be a few 'second generation' in-laws who'd barely know me and I doubt they'd bother since they've moved away. I like the idea of being buried next to my husband but he's not helping by saying he hates the small town he came from even more than I do and doesn't want to be buried there and if he keeps that up he's going to end up in a city cemetery and I absolutely don't want to be buried in a city cemetery, I'd prefer being stuck with the in-laws. The family tomb in England has been full since the 1800's and isn't accepting any new-comers. I'd take cremation with my ashes scattered in the lake where I grew up but the cussed lake, although I loved it, has so many ghosts that even dead, I'd be scared to be there. :rolleyes:
     
  4. usetawuz

    usetawuz Senior Registered

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    Interesting ideas, all of them. I intend to leave my material possessions to loved ones while my physical remains are cremated and my ashes spread over my favorite surf break. I just don't sense a strong attachment to my physical aspect beyond what we are doing together now. I have found it interesting that the more in touch with the other side I have gotten the more alive and better functioning this body becomes...which is nice!
     
  5. BriarRose

    BriarRose Senior Registered

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    Amazing how entertaining this thread is, considering the ghoulish subject matter! :D I really think MataMari has a point - if testing of some sort should ever exist to determine a chain of existence, cremated remains couldn't be tested.
     
  6. Sarellah

    Sarellah Senior Registered

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    None ya!
    But fish and other sea creatures drink out of lakes and rivers! Pollution = bad!
     
  7. Spatz

    Spatz Senior Registered

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    I'm fine and dandy with cremation. I grew up as a penny pincher and consider the cost of burial to be a ridiculous expense. By the time I'm finished with my body, what would warrant its keeping in a silly box? Even what to do with the ashes is sort of not my concern. There are places I'd like them spread for the sake of emotion and for romance, but I place more importance on the funeral itself than on disposal of the body.

    Due to the high heat of the typical cremation process and water content of the human body, tissues are vaporized and so the ashes are a result from the destruction of bone. These ashes, as such, are not pollution, esp. in the quantity of a single urn's content. The fish will do fine. Carbon is a thing they are accustomed to.


    Regarding mercury, I'm leery of this theory in that certainly you attribute the mercury source as dental fillings. These are very much out of vogue and could be removed beforehand of course. Surely you wouldn't rather bury them if this is such a concern? Regarding energy usage, energy requirement for a single cremation is quite low. With your post count as an assumption of time spent, I'm quite assured that the amount of coal and nat'l gas consumed during your time at CPL would be far, far, higher than that required to cremate you! So really, you needn't worry. Methinks your spiritual reasons warrant more importance for the subject!


    Source: Engineering major, parents in the dental industry, and lived near a crematory.


    Owl, since bone fragments do remain, perhaps you could indeed have your future testing done!
     
  8. Eowyn

    Eowyn Wrought out of steel

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    Pollution? Why? Like Spatz said, during cremation very high temperatures are reached. Believe me, that kills "almost" everything that could cause pollution, unless you're talking of air pollution. I think there many others sources of pollution who need more urgent control than cremation.


    And anyway, hundreds of animals, in and out of sea and rivers, die every day, where do you think those remains go? Nature is wiser than we think...
     
  9. Owl

    Owl Super-alt Mitglied

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    Even though if it's put like that it sounds tempting and easier to be cremated (after all, everyone can keep an urn, but it`ll be too hard to keep an entire body) I think that it will be hard to perform DNA tests with the little pieces that would remain from cremation. Also, they might even be damaged because of the fire and all that. I know that they had quite a difficult time back in 1991 with my Pl bones (even though they had the whole skeleton or most of it) because it was buried in a really humid place and it was in bad condition (and I think there was a leak in the coffin). It decomposed pretty fast for just 6 years! They could only get a decent sample from the femur.


    To be honest, I donĀ“t know why I even bother about future genetic studies if I could just somehow do it now, with the advantage that half of it it's already done. I just want to avoid professional suicide I suppose. I should find the way to do my actual testing with nobody knowing and do the comparison myself maybe. Although it would be just for fun/ to satisfy personal curiosity since I won't be able to publish the results.
     
  10. MaritaMari

    MaritaMari Senior Registered

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    The biggest problem with testing, future or not, is how to acquire the remains of your possible pl. Most of the time, that is if there is body, it would reacquire exhumation or asking collectors/museums to borrow the remains... in both cases it would reacquire awful lot of explaining and it would probably result in nothing or maybe public ridicule.
     
  11. argonne1918

    argonne1918 Senior Registered

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    Not to mention legal issues. I think you have to have permission of the family or law enforcement to exhume a body.
     
  12. MaritaMari

    MaritaMari Senior Registered

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    Exactly. And try explaining them why you want to exhume the body.
     
  13. BriarRose

    BriarRose Senior Registered

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    Metal pieces are removed by the Crematorium, and offered to the family members. When my son-in-law died, they tried to present his pacemaker to my daughter. It was an awful thing, added on to an awful time. They wanted her to push the button, to start the process. She declined to be present, and spent the day with me. On the subject of cremation, I know a lot of people who's family members have been in the hall closet for decades. Time passes, and no one wants to scatter them. If any one chooses that route, find someone you trust to actually get rid of them, unless you want your remains stored with the vacuum, and the dog's leash. Some people I know have had the ashes of the deceased in the trunks of their cars for eight years. A funny thing happened in the U.S. A woman had an urn with her dog's ashes on her mantel. Thieves broke in, thought the ashes were "dope", and tried to smoke her dog. It wasn't mentioned if they achieved a "high"!
     
  14. Misty8723

    Misty8723 Senior Registered

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    My mother was cremated, and my father has her ashes in an urn on a stand in the living room. We had no part in the cremation part, we left after the service (they had her laid out in a casket for the service) and picked up the ashes (in the urn) when they were ready. At that time, the funeral director told us that a lot of people never even come claim the ashes.


    My wish is to be cremated when I go, and husband feels the same way. My aunt, on the other hand, made me promise not to have her cremated when she goes and she decided to pre plan her funeral because of that. My personal feeling is that once I'm dead, I'm out of there, and you can do whatever you want with the body.
     
  15. BriarRose

    BriarRose Senior Registered

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    In my son-in-law's case, we were required to rent a casket, and purchase a disposable liner. That's because an actual funeral was involved. It was surprisingly expensive, as are the urns, and a niche at the cemetery. It's the nature of Capitalism, I suppose. My daughter does ceramics, and I requested a nice funerary urn, but she refused. There are nice copies of Egyptian canopic urns for sale in New Age stores. A little forethought and planning goes a long way. For someone with an Egyptian PL, it would be a nice touch.
     
  16. spacecase0

    spacecase0 Senior Registered

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    for many years I could feel the last body I had,


    it caused me much pain


    formaldehyde seems to have preserved it way to long,


    it did eventually fade though,


    so in our culture, cremation might be the better way to go.


    but not sure if cremation is worse, no memories of it.
     
  17. hydrolad

    hydrolad Senior Moderator Super Moderator

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    Finances pretty much have dictated that I will be cremated at the end of this life and that's OK with me, as I most likely won't be here to watch it, but instead will be again enjoying the sights of my real HOME.


    Some people put too much emphasis on the physical body, but it is, but a "carrier" for the most important part, and that is the Soul, the very essence of who we are, the energy that defines us.


    For we are spiritual beings composed of energy temporarily trapped in a "Flesh and Bones" prison while on this physical plane.


    "Homecomings" here on Earth have nothing at all, compared to the Homecomings on the "Other Side", for the sheer joy of seeing loved ones once again and spending time with them.
     
  18. argonne1918

    argonne1918 Senior Registered

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    Embalming is not required by law. If you choose direct internment embalming is not required. My father was buried in the cemetery several weeks before we had the memorial service. He was not embalmed. My brother died two years ago and we did the same thing.
     
  19. Mama2HRB

    Mama2HRB Senior member Staff Member

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    I think it might be easier to think about it for us because we all know we will be coming back :)
     
  20. BriarRose

    BriarRose Senior Registered

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    I see no point in embalming. I think spacecase is right - it is unnatural. As argonne said, it's only required by morticians for an open casket funeral. I really don't fancy having people stare at my remains. I will be an introvert, even in death.


    Mama, I think you are correct also. The knowledge of reincarnation makes it easier to tolerate our own mortality. "Death, where is thy sting?"as Ist Corinthians says. Oddly, I always attributed that to Shakespeare. My education has many "holes". But, I don't think reincarnation makes losing someone we love easier. We love their current form, and the relationship we had with them.
     

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