How exactly is a near death experience triggered?

Discussion in 'SCIENTIFIC and ANECDOTAL research' started by Kristopher, Sep 22, 2013.

  1. Kristopher

    Kristopher Senior Registered

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    I know that a NDE is common in people who are in unfortunate situations such as a car crash and similar situations. Even if that person is physically unharmed, a NDE may still occur which I'm assuming is triggered by a mental state. In all cases I've read it seems that this happens when a person is 'caught off guard'.

    I've read a couple of books about 'death row' in America (interesting in its on way but definitely not something to read right before bed). What I've picked up on is that out of the majority of people who say their last words, they seem to talk about the crime they committed, or say sorry to the victims families and goodbye to their own. Now I know that doesn't seem weird, but there's none(that I've read anyway) that speak of strange happenings going on such as a NDE.. and knowing you're about 5mins away from death seems enough to trigger a mental response to cause a NDE to me.

    So what's the cause? When does it happen and why does it happen? Does knowing you're actually going to die in advance stop such an experience - and maybe not knowing you're about to die or close to death is what triggers an NDE?
     
  2. Eowyn

    Eowyn Wrought out of steel

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    I think that both phenomena are included under the same name "near death experience", but it's not totally the same. If you have read Raymond Moody's work, you know a "complete" NDE includes a number of stages: OBE, white light similar to a tunnel, panoramic view of your life, encountering deceased (or not) persons, a "being of light" or other entities that are there to calm and guide you... etc. Usually not all these stages occur. In the cases you mentioned at the beginning, people report mainly OBE's, during which they see their own body suffering the accident, and maybe seeing the panoramic view, but as far as I remember, they don't talk about the other stages. I think this is because the body was not in real danger. Anyway, this is something triggered unconsciously, by some unknown mechanism, it's not something you can control, and I don't think "a mental state" can trigger a NDE. If not, any person who is suffering a chronic illness and knows about their imminent death, would suffer a NDE too.


    I've heard a lot of persons describing what they called a NDE, but the truth is that it was only an OBE, caused by the anesthesia. They could see their bodies while they were undergoing surgery, but the body was never in danger so it wasn't a "real" NDE. I guess that NDE's are triggered by certain physiological processes when the link between soul and body is damaged in a certain degree. If that damage can be repaired, the soul comes back. If there's no actual damage, no matter how much you "imagine" you're going to die, you won't live a NDE.
     
  3. dking777

    dking777 Senior Registered

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    Dr. Moody is the leading authority on the 'near-death experience'—a phrase he coined in the late seventies.

    I read how Moody became interested in the subject (as a psychologist) after hearing a lecture by another Doctor who had 'died' during combat and spoke about it. Dr. George Ritchie.

    The initial scientific study and inquiry into the subject was about 'conscious' surviving and an awareness active while the 'brain' has stopped functioning due to 'blood and oxygen' loss after the heart has stopped 'beating' and pumping the vital elements for the brain to function according to the scientific understanding in the late 70's. Doctors and scientists hadn't taken this sort of testimony seriously prior and wrote it off as delirium from the trauma associated with the oxygen loss to the brain. From what I have read and studied of the research, it was based on testimony of people who had been in a condition of 'clinical death' and observed by trained Doctors to have flat lined on the monitor.


    I had a student write me once to tell me about his so-called 'near-death' experience. He got drunk for the first time - and the room was spinning and he hugged a toilet seat for hours praying to God. He felt (when he sobered up) that he had a religious experience because of all the 'lights he saw flashing' in his head. He felt it was a 'religious' experience and in his mind 'counted' as the same thing as 'dying' and going to the light. But, did his heart stop beating and his vital signs cease to be pronounced 'clinically dead' before being revived by modern technology? He felt he 'almost' died that night.


    Someone passes a railroad track and narrowly has a train miss impact with is car - had a 'near-miss' or 'near-death' experience. Almost having a tragic accident is not the same thing as having the impact and then being revived back to life again after a 'physical and clinical death.'


    From a study of 150 people who had clinically died or almost died, Moody concluded that there are nine experiences common to most people who have had a near death experience. These are:

    • hearing sounds such as buzzing
    • a feeling of peace and painlessness
    • having an out-of-body experience
    • a feeling of traveling through a tunnel
    • a feeling of rising into the heavens
    • seeing people, often dead relatives
    • meeting a spiritual being such as God
    • seeing a review of one's life
    • feeling a reluctance to return to life


    Anyone can have an 'out of body' experience without suffering the trauma and loss of vital signs. I feel that the modern understanding have the two mixed up and confused as one and the same.


    If I was 'five minutes' away from 'death' and KNEW without a doubt I wasn't coming back - I sure as heck wouldn't want to 'jump' out of my body - run to heaven - only to have them to tell me I had to 'get back' in my body again for the last five minutes of life. I can tell you (from experience) the hardest part about the "NDE" - is that dang climb back into the physical and human body again. If I knew that I was going to be 'dead and gone' in five minutes time - I would just wait and not have to endure the hardship of climbing back into a body after having tasted the 'sweet aroma' of heaven.


    Sincerely,


    DKing
     

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