Ian's story.

Discussion in 'Children's Past Lives -Age 7 & under' started by 4mysonK, Nov 30, 2008.

  1. 4mysonK

    4mysonK 4mysonK

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    Tanguerra, thanks for the great advice.


    Fortunately, I've been trying to balance this ever since he was born, so I'm used to it. He, on his own, acts much older than he is. When he was two, he went to a short preschool program twice a week. Every time I walked into the classroom, I was reminded of the differences between Ian and other children. They had pacifiers, blankies, jelly on their cheeks, and could barely communicate. Ian has never even taken a pacifier or had a security blanket/toy. He couldn't relate to those children, so during class time, he helped the teacher. When it came time to play, they sent him to the 4-year-old class so he could actually enjoy himself. He's not some kind of genius. He doesn't know all his letters or count to ten yet. As I read more and more about past lives, it makes sense. He was born with this 'mature' personality, but just like everyone else, he's got to learn the basics. Hehe.


    Yesterday, he was saying something about Santa Claus bringing toys to little kids, but he's a big kid. I told him that it was ok to be a little kid, and that he doesn't have to be a tough guy all the time. He said, "I don't?" I tried to reassure him, and I guess I need to keep doing that. :)


    Again, thanks for putting that into words, Tanguerra. I've been doing that, but maybe not as conciously as I should be.


    Iris---Yes, Center Hill is here in the USA. It's the area where I grew up. I'm not completely sure, but the overall picture I'm getting is that my son was a Chinese man named Liang. He said he knew our friend Kang-Seok before, but yesterday, he said he knew him when he was a "ghost." I don't know if he knew him on earth and in limbo, or in just one place. Of course, China and Korea have a history of both working together and working against each other. It's not unlikely that he was Chinese, but had Korean ties.


    Do you think maybe the tattoos might have been engravings on armor? He mentioned that when he fell on the mountain, his knees didn't get hurt because he had something on his leg, ankle to knee that protected him. At first, I figured he really meant tattoos, and that the "suit" was skin. But since he wouldn't know how to say something is engraved, maybe he was using tats as an example. Hmmm...


    It SEEMS that Ian was saying that he couldn't speak to people at first, then he got out of the "dead city" and could finally communicate. You guys can tell me what you think, but it appears that he had to spend some time there as a sort of 'penance,' then was helped out of there and went to find Soh-Soh. After that, he came to me. Does this make any sense?


    :D
     
  2. tanguerra

    tanguerra Moderator Emeritus

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    I know exactly how he feels! I remember being shocked in kindergarten about how 'childish' all the children were! I couldn't relate to them at all! I used to quite like playing dressups and painting though.

    Awww! Gorgeous.

    When he talks about 'Center Hill' he may be referring to the actual place in the USA. But, what he actually said was 'Centre Hill sky'.

    Since his 'heaven' images all seem to be mountainous (and there seem to be a lot of 'mountains' in Liang's real life too) it could be his way of explaining where Liang lived in 'heaven' or in his real life (or both) in some sort of central hilly area. He may well have heard you talk about 'Centre Hill' as where you came from, so has these two ideas combined in his mind in some way? It's hard to say.

    He may have worn armour and have had tattoos if he was a 'tough guy', which he might have been by the sound of it (he says he was 'bad'). Or there might not be any armour, just lots of red snake tattoos. Red dragons perhaps? I did some googling, but did not really turn up anything of particular interest or relevance to do with red snakes or dragon tattoos, except this:


    In Japan, tattoos are strongly associated with the yakuza, particularly full body tattoos done the traditional Japanese way (Tebori).


    and this:


    Tattooing has also been featured prominently in one of the Four Classic Novels in Chinese literature, Water Margin, [1345 AD] in which at least three of the characters ... are described as having tattoos covering nearly the whole of their bodies....


    Both from Wikipedia


    Apparently tattooing was quite common throughout Asia in the most ancient times, and was used in part to denote social rank, then it fell out of favour under Confucianism:


    Tattoos do have a history in Korea. In ancient times Korean fisherman would tattoo themselves to ward off evil when out to sea. During the Chosun Dynasty (1392-1910), thieves and criminals were branded with tattoos. Under the influence of Confucian philosophy tattoos came to be seen as scarring the body, in violation of the precept to “preserve the body, hair and skin inherited from ancestors.


    Obviously it is back 'in' again these days, but has only taken off fairly recently in Asia, as it was once seen as only a thing for gangsters, etc. (a bit like in the West).


    If he is talking about his most recent past life, we might assume it was some time last century, or it might be in the 'olden days' (he talks about a 'king' for example) or there may be more than one life mixed up here. His concept of linear time is as yet undeveloped of course - as you know from his fuzzy use of 'Saturday' and '50 hours' being a really long time and so on. (So cute. :) )


    It is not uncommon to share many lives with the same 'cast of characters'. I would say it is not impossible you have been his mother before. He said you are his 'favourite Mommy' for instance.


    Hard to say with any certainty until more detail is forthcoming. No doubt it will slowly come out as he talks about it a bit. Best not to jump to too many conclusions in the meantime. If he can draw well enough yet, you might ask him to draw you a picture of Liang (next time he raises it)?
     
  3. maulacat

    maulacat New Member

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    I've done a bit of researching on the net. If maybe he does mean armour, then these links are quite interesting:-


    This one talks about Chinese and Sino-Korean armour made up of scales, which looks very much like reptile skin:
    http://military.wikia.com/wiki/Korean_armour


    ...and this one shows Chinese "lamellar" armour, which I think looks remarkably like snake skin
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamellar_armour


    However, if he was actually talking about tattoos on the skin, the only thing that I have found so far that could mean anything is this:- "The snake is one of the 12 animals which appear in the 12-year cycle of the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar. (Born in 1917, 1929, 1941, 1953, 1965, 1977, 1989, 2001)" - maybe a Chinese person would have a snake/snakes tattooed on them if they, or someone they loved, was born in the year of the snake(?) - Just an idea!


    Just had another thought on this actually! When referring to the "red snake tattoos", maybe your son is actually talking about scars? Especially if Lian was a "mean" man, as he's said, who probably got into a lot of trouble in his life. They would probably be long, thin, red marks, like a "red snake" and would be permanent, like a tattoo. But then, if your son knows what tattoos are, maybe he would know what scars are! Do you think he understands what scars are?
     
  4. IrisG.

    IrisG. Senior Registered

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    Ian`s mom: Do you think that you can motivate your son to tell a little more about the "king"? That could be very valuable in creating a historical context. I think that the "king" needn`t be a "king" as we understand the word but for a three-year-old, any powerful man or leader or even a high-ranked soldier might be a "king". From my personal point of view, I would think that he actually refers to tatooes (unusual for such a young kid to know about tatooes!). I am not sure if his referances to Soh-Soh being reborn and being three years old like he is might be fantasies to comfort him? Maybe that is what he wishes for her (and for himself), that she is as old as he is now so that they can eventually meet (and marry) when they are old enough? I guess that it is very difficult to distinguish what is fact and what is fantasy. There is no reason why a kid with past-life-memories doesn`t tell invented stories like any other child. Ian has the perfect age to remember and seems to have sufficient verbal capacities to express his memories. Enjoy this amazing time!
     
  5. 4mysonK

    4mysonK 4mysonK

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    Thanks SO much for your insight and research! Iris, maulacat, tanguerra--you all guided me to the armor issue, which became a little more. Here's an update.


    What he told me:


    I showed him that photo from maulacat, but didn't say what it was or anything about it. I just said, "Look at this." He stared at it and looked very curious, but asked what it was. At first, I didn't want to lead him in any way, so I didn't answer, but he asked again. I think I just said, "It's armor." He just gave me an 'ahh,' and went back to his play-doh.


    Since his reaction was one of recognition, I asked if he had armor when he was Liang. He said yes, but his was white. I thought he meant silver, so I asked again. No, definitely WHITE. Of course, in my little ol' brain, there's no white armor, but I looked it up, and yep. There were different colors, and I found one photo that had drawings of one kind. Chinese armor, but it didn't look like it. Actually, this version was for ceremonial purposes. That was the first thing I found, so I showed him that, too. He took one look at it and said it was a "Korean suit." After looking up what Korean armor looked like, it DID look like that. Also, the particular one I showed him looked very Korean in general, as it was loosely made. (He wouldn't 'know' this, btw.) I won't go on and on about it because there is so much more to tell.


    Here's the link: http://chinese-armour.freewebspace.com/photo2.html


    I intend on looking into this more later, but if you want to compare or research, feel free. :)


    Also, the tats he mentioned were definitely tattoos. He said he had them on his "back, belly, everywhere." Then, he started to count them. He can't really count, for whatever reason. For such a smart kid, he just doesn't get it. Anyway, he said "One...Four...Eight. Uh....He had one...five...uh...All over!"


    On that note, Ian was crazy about tattoos when he was very, very small. He called them too-toos. My sister has some and strangely enough, instead of a wedding ring, his Dad has "Wife" tattooed on his arm in CHINESE. Anyway, Ian knows what they are. He'd beg me to draw tattoos on him almost every day!


    Moving on---


    He was a "guard." I'm sure he's heard this word somewhere, but it is an unusual word for a 3-year-old. The kinds of movies he watches usually would have a prince, king, etc. People aren't mere guards. Ha! Actually, I don't think I've ever heard him say that word.


    I did ask what the king's name was, and he said what sounded like: Soh-Me. Then, strangely, he said the queen's name was Sexy. Haha! Well, it sounded like Sexy. And no, he's never said that word before (to my knowledge), nor do we go around saying it. I got distracted by that, plus he kept talking. I wish I'd broken the name down more. (I just asked him again, and he said what sounded like Quexi?)


    Anyway, I inadvertantly asked him about the 'man he guarded,' instead of saying 'king.' He said that man's name was something like "Sil-fee" and he wore a black suit. (Also mentioned the word "Skoh." I don't know how it's related.) While discussing this man, Ian got kind of angry and said that he didn't like the guy and wanted to "rip his guts out." He'd also told me that as a guard he killed lots of bad guys and "chopped them up." He also said that "Sil-Fee" was nice first, then was mean. He called him a friend a while later, which confused me. I said, "Ooh, I thought you wanted to rip his guts out." I don't know if he detected some doubt in my voice or what, but his answer to that was, "He's real, Mom."


    Ian said that man was "blonde." That didn't make sense, if you go by this story, so I asked him what color that was, just to confirm that he knew. He said "black." That made no sense. He definitely knows what black is. So I asked about blonde again, and he said it was like my sister's hair, which is almost white blonde. He also pointed at the Christmas tree lights, which are obviously almost white. I can see how he'd think my sister's hair and the lights are the same color. Do you think maybe the guy had salt-and-pepper hair, and he didn't know how to describe it? Any other ideas?
     
  6. 4mysonK

    4mysonK 4mysonK

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    He told me something surprising!


    Remember how I said he used to say "Fayo," but I didn't get much more than it being a boy? He hasn't talked about Fayo in probably 8 months or so, and even when he did, it was just a mention here or there.


    Today, he said, on his own, that his real name was "Fao," which sounds somewhere between Fayo and Fow. I didn't understand, of course, and he explained that Soh-Soh didn't know that his real name was Fao because he didn't want her to know what he did, meaning KILL PEOPLE. He said several times, "I kept it a secret" or "It was a secret." I asked him why, and he said she'd be mad at him because she was nice. He also said he slept with her in her room.


    As I think back on it, he began telling me his name was Liang during a conversation about what he CALLED Soh-Soh. He said it wasn't her real name, but he called her that for love. We were discussing what she CALLED him, not what his actual name was.


    Here's another AWESOME detail. I thought it was nothing at the time, but wrote it down anyway. I'm glad I did! He's always said she had dogs, but when I asked their names or what they looked like, he said our dogs names and said they looked them. (Beagle and mini-dachshund, not likely in China, huh.)


    Today, after I asked if she had pets, he said, "Yes, she had three dogs, Fo, Shi, and Kiki." He says they had LONG hair. Two were boys and one was a girl. *I asked just now which ones were boys, and he said "Shi and Fo."


    Now get this!


    I looked it up and the Lions of FO are those lions you always see on each side of a Chinese entrance. According to Wikipedia, they traditionally stood in front of Chinese Imperial palaces, temples, emperors' tombs, government offices, and the homes of government officials and the wealthy from the Han Dynasty (206 BC-220 AD), until the end of the empire in 1911. They are only made in pairs, apparently, and were modeled after DOGS! And, the word for lion in Chinese is......SHI! I have yet to figure out the Kiki thing. (My heart is racing over that one!)


    *Thank goodness for the internet!*
     
  7. tanguerra

    tanguerra Moderator Emeritus

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    This is all very, very interesting.

    I don't think he's talking about a 'security guard' type of guard. It could be that he was in the King's 'guard'. It is usual for rulers to have their own private 'mini-army' which answers only to them. It is quite possible that the king's household guard might have worn a distinctive and unusual type of armour - white for instance - as Ian describes. It would certainly seem to make sense.


    The royal guard is usually made up of the most elite soldiers with unquestioned personal loyalty to the king. For example, think of the Coldstream Guards who guard Buckingham Palace. They have their origins in this kind of idea. They are not just for decoration though, they serve a very practical purpose of course. In the case of a coup or assassination attempt, it is the job of the king's personal guard to give their own lives if neccessary to protect the monarch. We see an echo of this in the USA's secret service whose job it is to protect the President with their very lives if neccessary.


    More sinisterly, perhaps, and this could be part of what went on, the King might use his elite soldiers to do his 'dirty work' for him - to have inconvenient people killed for instance.

    It could be that the white haired man was Liang's 'boss' - either militarily or politically. He may have been a prince (Skoh?) or some other member of the King's family who he was assigned to protect and/or serve and/or carry out dirty work for. It could well be that they were 'friends' before things went sour for whatever reason.
     
  8. 4mysonK

    4mysonK 4mysonK

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    ^


    Thanks, Tanguerra!


    I meant, in Disney movies and such, it's usually about the king, not just a guard of his, so I doubt he was taking it from any movie.


    Thanks for elaborating a bit about the personal guards for royalty. You made some points that I hadn't thought of yet--- The 'dirty work' part, especially. If I look at it that way, I can see why he wouldn't want Soh-Soh to know about it. Doing your regular job as a solider is one thing, but all that extra stuff was probably way off the charts of 'mean'. Maybe he thought it was a deal-breaker, so he was careful not to reveal anything to her.


    Do you think he might NEED to tell me all of this stuff to rid himself of the guilt? He literally gets angry when talking about some of this stuff, as if he's mad about the whole situation of Fao/Liang.


    Also, in the first old-life comment he made to me, he said that the 'king' had tried to do something to Soh-Soh, and that he'd gone to kill the guy, but he killed Fao/Liang first. Sad. I can see how that would make for some upsetting memories!
     
  9. tanguerra

    tanguerra Moderator Emeritus

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    Yes, quite possibly and also, if it involved some sort of 'palace intrigue', political skullduggery and so on, I imagine it would have been secret and the fewer people who knew about it the better?

    I think at this point you can discount the hypothesis that any of this is coming from any Disney movies! :)


    As he has said 'This is real.' He is not making this up. These are memories. I have a lot of trouble talking to 'normal' people about my experiences, because they assume it is some kind of delusion. Whenever I would come out with some outlandish thing as a kid my mother would say 'What a vivid imagination you have!'. She meant it as a compliment, but I gave up in the end.

    Imagine Ian was a grown up and had been away on a very long and exciting trip to ancient Korea and had just come back after being away for many years. He would want to tell you all about it wouldn't he? Good things had happened, bad things had happened, whatever, he would want to tell you all about it. He would no doubt get very worked up telling you about the really dramatic bits, of course.


    It's just like that.
     
  10. tanguerra

    tanguerra Moderator Emeritus

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    This is all very interesting stuff. As to the dogs, it was fairly usual for the royal families to keep these "dogs that looked like lions" in China - Shi Tzus ("Lion Dogs") which have lovely long hair. It was very much the fashion in fact. There were deliberately bred to look like the lion statues. Their names might have been a playful reference to that. This might explain Kiki's name:


    "The Shih Tzu therefore also has the nickname "Tibetan temple dog". It is also often known as the "Xi Shi quan" (西施犬), based on the name of Xi Shi, regarded as the most beautiful woman of ancient China"


    That would certainly seem to make sense if there was a 'pair' of males and Kiki was the female, wouldn't it?


    If not Shih Tzu, then possibly Pekingese, which were also kept by Chinese royalty and had long hair and were sometimes called 'Foo' dogs and were supposed to look like 'lions'. Maybe you could ask him which one looks the most like Soh-Soh's dogs?


    China had a great deal of cultural influence in Korea at various times, and Korea paid tribute to China on and off. I am sure there would have been a lot of back and forth between the two nations and probably intermarriage by the royal families to cement the alliances. Particularly after 1392 there was a close connection:


    "In 1392 a Korean general, Yi, Song-gye, was sent to China to campaign against the Ming rulers. Instead, he allied himself with the Chinese, returned to overthrow the Korean king, and setup his own dynasty."


    This is a good, brief article about the period. It was very tumultuous at various times with battles between the princes and so on, so that all seems to fit.


    There is a picture of the imperial palace at Seoul which was built around this time. Ian said Soh-Soh's house was all red and gold. I wonder if it looked anything like this?


    The capital moved from Gaegyeong to Seoul under this dynasty. What part of Korea did you say you felt 'drawn to'? This could narrow down the century perhaps if it was before or after the capital was moved.
     
  11. tanguerra

    tanguerra Moderator Emeritus

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    There is nothing you have to 'do' 4mysonK, that you are not already doing, which is to listen with interest to his stories and record everything in case he forgets about it later. He is much too little to be worrying too much about any 'bad karma' yet. He sounds like a little angel in this life at least!


    I have a fairly blood curdling set of memories of various battle field exploits and some of them I have had since childhood. I don't actually feel particularly guilty or upset about most of them. I am often quite surprised myself at how 'matter-of-fact' I feel about it all really. After all, as Ian explained to you, that was then and this is now and it was in another life altogether and this life is a whole new ball game. Obviously I would never dream of killing anyone nowadays. I gave all that up ages ago, but back then it was really just a job and I don't carry a whole lot of guilt about it. Not at all. If Liang was a soldier, he was doing his job too - although, obviously he was not too happy with his boss by the sound of things!


    I have no doubt all your destinies are entwined, Ian, 'Soh-Soh' and yourself quite possibly have a shared history, and in time all will become clear. When you get Carol's book it will have all sorts of useful information on your type of situation.


    It is very quiet at work today, so I have been doing some digging, looking for King Soh-Me and Queen Xeshi. (I'm totally hooked!) I found this link which will probably be very helpful, which is a list of all the Kings of Korea in the 'olden days'. That is, if we are talking about a real, great king, not just a minor noble of some sort, but Ian has been pretty specific with his observations so far, and he knows what a king is so...


    One piece of validation is they all have a number of names as you will see. There was very heavy Chinese influence at one point - there is a whole line of 'Wang' this and 'Wang' that (Wang is Chinese for King).


    There is a King Yegong with a courtesy name 'Semin' on the list who took the throne in the 1100s, which is about the closest to 'Soh-Me'. He married the daughter of Yi Cha-gyom. I couldn't find her name but it has 'Yi' in it at least - but then they all seem to use a lot of nicknames and things so it's hard to say.


    There is a second King Yegong from the 1400s whose consort was a Lady Ki. His 'full posthumous name' was King Yejong Yangdo Heummun Seongmu Euiin Sohyo the Great of Korea, so he is another potential.


    There was a King Sinmun of Silla in the 600s who had a fairly turbulent reign also, but there is not a lot of info about his family and so on.


    I would suggest, without prompting him in any way or making a big deal out of it, and 'just for fun', you get a few snippets about the doings of his King and see if you can marry up the known historical facts, such as they are, against any of Ian's anecdotes? Again, I stress, this is 'just for fun' and interest, so don't push it.
     
  12. 4mysonK

    4mysonK 4mysonK

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    You guys are awesome! :cool


    One problem with figuring out what he's saying is that he has trouble with some of his letters. It's really odd how his vocabulary is so advanced, but it all comes out in a little voice. :) It took me forever to figure out that he was saying "Northies" the other day. Finally, he said it was like the North Pole. When hearing non-English words, it's really hard because I have no frame of reference.


    As for the emotions, he seems to have no problem with the actual killing he did. What makes him upset is the thought of some of the people. Sort of like disgust? That's the best way I can describe it.


    As far as I know, he has very few fears of any kind. It's quite strange! He's not scared of ghosts, bad guys in movies, witches, vampires, werewolves-----etc. He watches Ghosthunters with me like it's nothing. Recently, he's started saying he doesn't like the dark, but for that matter, neither do I! Ha! However, he knows what he's 'supposed' to be afraid of. One night, he came to our room and said, "Mom, I want to sleep in here." "Why?" "Because I'm afraid." "Of what?" I could see on his face that he was conjuring up a story. He actually had to think about what he was going to say! "Uh...ghosts? Monsters? Bad guys?" I finally just laughed and told him to go back to bed. He knew he was caught and just smiled on the way back to his room. ^L^


    He also has a great fear of me being hurt. I have tons of examples, but I won't mention all of them. A good one is when he was almost 3. I was turning over a pot, which was right below the porch where he was standing. When he saw all the worms and bugs underneath, he started yelling, "Mom! Get away from there!" I wasn't scared at all, so I just calmly told him I was fine. He was having none of it. He started yelling at me like he was the parent. "I SAID get away from there! Those things will hurt you!" Again, I told him I was fine. So, he came running down the walkway in his diaper and no shoes. Finally, I just gave in and went inside. He's not really afraid of bugs himself, though. Go figure.


    Oh yes, and he does have a phobia about being left somewhere. I think that's actually from this lifetime, though, because I had brain surgery when he was 10 months old, and I couldn't fully keep him again for probably 6 months. He kept going to the grandmas about 2 hours away, and staying for a week at a time. It's not a major phobia, though. He might mention it, but he doesn't cry or anything. Just, "You're coming back, right?" "Right." "Ok, then it won't be that bad."


    Tonight, my friend took him out to dinner, and she said that he pointed to a girl and said she was Soh-Soh. Hmm. Later, when we were alone, I asked him about it, and he said it wasn't Soh-Soh, but she had long blonde hair like her and was three. I don't think he talked to the little girl, but she must have looked his age.


    Since Chinese history is so extensive, what kinds of questions could I ask? I can't figure out what would work as far as getting more information. I've asked if he knows where he lived. He's told me names of people. Still, nothing. Any ideas?


    *Also, I found that 'Soh' is also a Chinese surname. Maybe Soh-Soh wasn't Korean, but Chinese. However, Ian seems to know interesting tidbits about Korea, and there is also our link to the place. Hmm.
     
  13. 4mysonK

    4mysonK 4mysonK

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    Update today---


    He told me that Soh-Soh's real name was something like Shi-bi. "Shee-Bee" said quickly.
     
  14. 4mysonK

    4mysonK 4mysonK

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    I had assumed the dogs were small because he'd said before they were like ours--Dachshund and Beagle. Who knows, maybe he means they were cuddly and sweet! Ha!


    He told me today that the dogs were big, black and orange. Orange? Even HE had a funny look on his face when he said that. Ha! The only dog that I could think of that looks that way is a Chow, but I didn't know if they were ever black. I found this photo, and he goes, "Yeah, like that!"


    [​IMG]


    However, he said, "That one's name is Gao." I asked about the other names, but he said "the dog has two names." In a way, I didn't like that I'd asked so frankly because I don't like to 'lead' his answers in any way. Then again, one of our dogs has two names, and we use one just as much as the other. I just don't want to make things fit when they don't. You guys know what I mean.


    When I clicked back to the page with the black dog, he glanced over and happily went, "Yeah, yeah, now THAT is what Soh-Soh's dogs looked like." I said, "Are you sure?" "Yes." He said two of them were like the photo, but the other dog was yellow. Yellow/Orange. I can see why he'd say that, considering the color of the usual chow.


    No wonder he's not afraid of large dogs! :eek: )


    Anyway, that was just a tidbit for the day.
     
  15. tanguerra

    tanguerra Moderator Emeritus

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    Don't ask him any questions whatsoever, would be my advice, certainly not about Chinese history. Just let him tell you all about it in his own time. Be sure to keep it low key and conversational if you can. "Oh really? Then what happened?"


    Just write down bits and pieces that he might say.
     
  16. ButterflyPsyche

    ButterflyPsyche Senior Registered

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    I agree.


    It might not hurt to visit a museum with Chinese art or artifacts, though.
     
  17. 4mysonK

    4mysonK 4mysonK

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    Today, he told me that Soh-Soh used to write letters for her parents, then send them to a friend, who'd send them to another friend, etc.


    This was as we were driving up to a fast food place. Once we went through the drive-thru, he said, "Mom, Soh-Soh broke a glass dollhouse, and her Mom hit her. She got a piece of glass in her knee, and a doctor had to take it out with his pincher things." I asked what the doctor's name was, not really expecting an answer. He said Dr. Hill. Harrrrord Hill." It took me a while to work out that first name. He told me I was saying it correctly, and was irritated that I was commenting on the strange name. I even laughed. He didn't like that so much. "What, it's not funny!" Ha! Finally, I said, "Do you mean....Harold?" "Yes! Yes, that's it!"


    I know one person named Harold, and I certainly don't talk about the man. Ian's never even met him. He's an old friend's Dad. As of yet, I can't figure out where he got the name. It's not very fantastical. :laugh:


    The story about the dollhouse seemed to be in the "now." Anyone ever heard of a glass dollhouse? :tongue:


    This was one of the odd occasions where I couldn't tell, by his tone of voice, if he was story-telling or what. Usually, it's very clear--one way or the other. Unfortunately, I couldn't see him, either, because I was driving and he was behind me.


    As we finally got home, I was parking and he was talking. All I caught was something about Soh-Soh's urethra.


    "What?"


    "I said nothing."


    "What about Soh-Soh's urethra?"


    "Nothing."


    "Sorry, I just didn't hear you."


    "She has one."


    "I know."


    I just let it go, as I could tell he was clamming up. He completely understands what a urethra is, and has for probably a year. This past summer, he randomly said, "Mom, I have a really long urethra."


    HAAAAAAA! Interesting observation!


    As you can tell by all these conversations, I wasn't exaggerating about his vocabulary and comprehension. He really does say these things, and I'm only telling you the 'past lives' stuff. ;)


    *Anyway, just a tidbit for the day.*


    P.S. I'm reading Carol's book about children's past lives. It's FASCINATING, but of course, you guys know that.
     
  18. alaskanlaughter

    alaskanlaughter Senior Registered

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    I'm so glad you enjoy the book! And thank you for sharing about your wonderful son. I look forward to hearing more. :)
     
  19. Karoliina

    Karoliina Moderator Emerita

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    I'm wondering if he's mixing up several past lives together (it happens!) - or maybe he has a psychic connection to Soh-Soh in this life (as this blonde little girl he's been talking about), and the incident with the doll house and the doctor happened to her in the now?


    My first thought was that maybe a little girl was playing with an element of decoration, such as an ornament glass house (Christmas decoration, perhaps?), not a toy, and it was accidentally broken. Which could make her mother angry.


    Karoliina
     
  20. 4mysonK

    4mysonK 4mysonK

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    Karoliina, those were my thoughts exactly! I even casually looked up Dr. Harold Hill, and found a family practitioner in Arkansas, which is just a state over from us. It was the first thing Google brought up. :eek: ) Eh, it was probably nothing, but was worth a shot to feed my curiosity. I even though about calling the man and asking if he took glass out of a little girl's knee recently. Ha! But, that might be borderline nuts. :tongue:


    I also think he might be remembering more than one past life at a time. He sometimes refers to himself as a little boy with Soh-Soh, but doesn't have much information about it. It's the life where he was a man that is at the forefront of his mind.
     

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