Little things

Discussion in 'Children's Past Lives -Age 7 & under' started by Chelle, Jan 28, 2005.

  1. Chelle

    Chelle Probationary

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    I know there are a lot of parents on here with children that may or may not remember past lives (not to mentions aunts, uncles, grandparents, teachers, etc.). I thought it might be interesting to share the "little things" children do that reminds you that they have lived before, even when they don't remember a past life.

    I'll start with one.

    My 4 year old daughter argues up and down that the middle meal of the day is called dinner and the evening meal is called supper, even though in our family we've always called the middle meal lunch and the evening meal dinner. She insists she's right, even stomping her foot for emphasis!:)
     
  2. Timeless

    Timeless Senior Registered

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    I was very verbal as a toddler and no one had any trouble understanding my words except for one word.

    I called donuts "dulips". I have no idea why, and this was the only word I ever used that wasn't "correct".

    I have often wondered where that word came from.
     
  3. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    HI Chelle,

    Your question reminds me of something that happened 13 years ago - when my son was seven. I went along on a school field trip with him and 30 of his classmates. At lunch time, the children all sat on the picnic benches eating their lunches. I had finished mine and was just sitting near by .... listening to them talk. Suddenly - a little boy got up from the table and yelled to his friend at the other end.

    He said - Come on Brian....let's go play. We have our lives to live all over again."

    Needless to say - I was speechless...and could hardly believe what I had just heard. Yet , there was no doubt - it was as clear as day. ;)
     
  4. Chelle

    Chelle Probationary

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    Isn't it interesting what comes out of the mouths of children?:D I love the mystery of it. It makes me wonder who were they and where does it come from.:) "Dalips" reminds me of little pieces of dough, it fits, and you have to wonder if and when those boys were living before.

    I've shared an experience with my daughter so here is one with my son.

    When my son was younger, he had an amazing understanding of steam engine trains. When he was starting kindergarten, all the children got a chance to tell about something, like a story, or something that happened to them, that sort of thing. According to the school principal who witnessed it and informed us of the incident, my son explained, in detail, using correct terminology, how a steam engine works and how it makes trains move. He was just shy of 5 years old at the time. :)
     
  5. Frenchi

    Frenchi Guest

    What are the meals called?

    Chelle,

    I am from the Southwestern U.S. (Texas, OKlahoma). With us, it was always - Breakfast, Dinner, Supper. When I went to work in the Northeast, it was - Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner. Everyone always laughed when I referred to the second meal as Dinner.
     
  6. Chelle

    Chelle Probationary

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    Frenchi,

    That's interesting to note. My father doesn't use the word "dinner" at all. With him it is breakfast, lunch and supper. A lot of people I know use "dinner" and "supper" interchangeably, but my daughter doesn't know anyone (except herself) that calls the middle meal "dinner" instead of "lunch". Perhaps her last life was in the Southwest.:)
     
  7. curious_girl

    curious_girl Curious Member

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    I enjoy to read about these little things.
    But I can't remember if I used to call things differently as a child,
    I sometimes ask my family members if I ever did or said anything unusual,
    and then they answer: you were in everything unusual ;)

    Steam trains, how I love the sound of them :)

    Curious Girl.
     
  8. Timeless

    Timeless Senior Registered

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    Thanks Chelle.

    I've never heard of "dalips". What is the origin of that word?

    When my son was a toddler he was given a pair of cowboy boots, and he refused to wear any other shoes.

    He loved to dress up as a cowboy and play with toy guns.
    He is an only child and always had an active imagination, and played well by himself.

    He had one phobia that we (the family) have teased him about as he got older. My son is 26 yrs old now.

    He was terrifed of Smokey The Bear, and his warning of "Only you can help prevent forrest fires" slogan. When he saw him he would start crying hysterically, and we would change the channel and reassure him it was okay.
    I wish now that I had asked him more about the fear.

    To this day he grumbles about Smokey.
     
  9. bishopk

    bishopk Senior Registered

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    Interesting stories here! I could be wrong, but the use of "dinner" for a noonday meal instead of lunch is probably more widespread than the Southwest - for instance, there are rural parts of the southern Midwest in which that holds true too.

    As far as children's PL behaviors, I used to wonder about my daughter's habit of putting her dolls and stuffed toys to bed when she was a toddler. Virtually every flat surface became a bed and virtually every piece of something made out of fabric became a blanket. She did this constantly and with such care that I used to wonder if she'd been, say, a nurse in a children's ward, worked in an orphanage, or else had been the mother of a large family. At that stage of her life, she did more putting-to-bed than other play activities with her toys.

    She could have focused on feeding her toys, giving them baths, etc. but instead focused on putting them to bed! (she was sleeping well at this stage herself).

    Aimee
     
  10. Frenchi

    Frenchi Guest

    More on "Breakfast , Dinner, Supper"

    Bishopk, Chelle

    I lived in Northwest Oklahoma near the Kansas border and not too far from the Texas panhandle. So, I wouldn't be too surprised if this expression was common in Kansas, considered the midwest by most. I also lived in the Amarillo, TX area and I'm also pretty sure it was used there. It would be interesting to know if people from Nebraska also used this expression.
     
  11. Klarry

    Klarry Senior Registered

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    It's also a very common thing in certain parts of Britain. I'm originally from Lancashire in the North West and I was brought up to say "Breakfast, dinner and tea" (anything after tea would be supper). I now say "Breakfast, lunch and dinner" but my mum still calls lunch 'dinner' as do lots of people over here.
     
  12. Chelle

    Chelle Probationary

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    I'm not sure where I heard the word "dalips" before, but it sounds appropriate somehow.

    "He was terrifed of Smokey The Bear, and his warning of "Only you can help prevent forrest fires" slogan." I wonder if it was the bear, or the idea of forest fires that scared him.:confused:

    "I used to wonder about my daughter's habit of putting her dolls and stuffed toys to bed when she was a toddler." It sounds like a ritual that meant a lot to her. I've always found it fascinating how children play. I think it tells us a lot about what's going on inside their heads.

    It's interesting how what to call meals caught our attention.:) I probably wouldn't have thought twice about it if my daughter hadn't started showing her temper at my use of the word "dinner". :D It's got me thinking about the history of those words and how they came to be used in the first place.
     
  13. Chelle

    Chelle Probationary

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    Okay, here's one my dad reminded me of when I told him about this thread. It's been kind of a family joke.:eek:

    From the time I was little I would sometimes slip into an English accent, especially if I were nervous or emotional. In fact, I slipped into the accent at my own wedding! :rolleyes: (It sure got the attention of the entire congregation!:D )

    I've always had an amazing knack for picking up accents, but they could never figure out where I might have been exposed to that one at such a young age. I also used to speak a few words in french according to my dad.
     
  14. Rod

    Rod Senior Registered

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    Meals and strange wording...

    The meanings of "dinner" and "supper" are quite variable geographically.

    In Maryland (Washington-Baltimore region), the two words are almost used in the same way. Either refers to the third meal of of the day, "supper" is a less formal word, often for a less fancy meal. We may also tend to think of it as being a bit earlier, but never would confuse "supper" with "lunch."

    In Central New York (Syracuse area), I knew many people who used "dinner" to mean an early afternoon meal, especially if were to be the main meal -- Thanksgiving Dinner was often served at about 14:00 (2:00 pm). "Supper" was the evening meal had on a day when one had a typical "lunch", rather than a large "dinner" in the earlier hours.

    For me, the unusual wording was the us of "map box" for "glove compartment". Even now, I use the standard term, but I am translating it in my mind -- I know it's just a funny way of saying "map box".

    My research has shown that "map box" was a common term on some carriages, and carried over to early automobiles in the U.K. It is also used on older aircraft. Any other information on the use of term would be greatly appreciated.

    Also, I repeat an earlier question - does
    "Katoykee" mean anything in any language? (Pronounced kuh-toy-key, with the middle syllable slightly accented and stretched)

    ...Rod
     
  15. Amandah Leigh

    Amandah Leigh New Member

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    When I was little, I was always afraid of fires. I still fear them actually, even to the point of having had a panic attack in a hotel when I was 15 or 16 when the fire alarm went off. When I was little, I could watch any TV show or movie with no issues, except Rescue 911's fire episodes.

    My mother, on the other hand, has always had a fear of hanging, and especially witches' hanging. She read Harry Potter to my little brother and loved it, but she hates movies/books that depiected witches' badly, like The Crucible and the end of the play version of The Scarlet Letter, in which Mistress HIbbins is hung as a witch...

    It is interesting how different our fears can be, and I've always wondered about the origins of my personal fears. Also, when I was very little and other children feared monsters under their beds, I was afraid of teenagers, namely, two boys and a girl I thought lived somewhere in the house and could get into my room through a trapdoor in the floor under my bed...


    *AL*
     
  16. Timeless

    Timeless Senior Registered

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    Smokey the Bear

    My son has never shown any fear of fire either as a child, or now as an adult.

    It's a wonder he doesn't, because I'm deathly afraid of fire, and am surprised I didn't pass this fear on to him.

    I believe that it was the bear he was afraid of for some reason that is now lost in his current memory.
     
  17. frodo

    frodo New Member

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    Re: Little things

    I think Dulips might be swedish?
    Tis: Mickes köttfärssås med spaghetti
    Veg: Dulips veggiesås med spaghetti
     
  18. Hippy16

    Hippy16 Senior Registered

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    Wow kids can be pretty interesting. here are some things i remember and what my parents told me.

    when i was little like 1-4 or 5 i would call all my family members by different names, i remember doing it becuase it felt right, their real names didnt sound right to me.

    my mom told me, that me, and my 3 brothers all about 2-4 would talk about "other life" "other parents" "when i died before" "remember when you died" weird stuff like that, but was put off as childish babble.

    i used to call tree shree LOL but i could say tree, i just thought it was too dry, probably just some kind of problem with my speech i guess.

    i have always like animals, when my family for the most part doesnt.

    The kids i baby sat for, would say some weird things. the girl who was 3 at the time told me she used to have babies but they all died and never grew up. she also said she once died in a house cuase it was too cold.

    i wonder what my nephew will say when he starts talking.
     
  19. norabrindle

    norabrindle Senior Registered

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    little things

    When I was a very little girl, I called my daddy John and said he was my husband. I did this for a long time. I would also cry when I looked in the mirror because I was "supposed" to see a little slim girl with dark complexion, long black hair that was braided on both sides, and I was supposed to see clear blue eyes. Instead I saw me, a fat mousey blond child with hazel eyes. I considered myself extremely ugly. In the past few years I have discovered that beauty is really on the inside. I still hate to look in the mirror.
     
  20. Midnight.Sapphires

    Midnight.Sapphires Senior Registered

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    Children

    When my cousin was little, he started saying "me" for my, in other words, he would say, "me head" or "me toy". My family tried and tried to correct him but he wouldn't change. Of course, he did grow out of it eventually. As I think back, it sounded like he spoke with a dialect similar to some parts of England, although at this moment, I can't remember where in England.

    His sister, when she got older, developed what we referred to as a "bum knee". Her father had it and his sister (her aunt) also had it. I thought this was odd and once told her that I felt she might have lived in medieval England, along with her father and aunt, and that they probably fought in some war and got their legs "bashed in" as was a common practice during war in the medieval times. This was also practiced in Ireland too, I think. (She has English and Irish blood in her, as well as German and Dutch).
     

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