Monk anyone?

Discussion in 'Past Life Memories' started by GreenKnight, Oct 13, 2003.

  1. Karma Tsring

    Karma Tsring New Member

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    I don't mind sharing or waiting.
    I warn you in advance,once i get going my spelling is awful.
    look forward to your views on these great experiances.

    smile love Tsring
     
  2. vicky

    vicky Senior Member

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    I thought it was interesting when i was trying to explain what prayer was to my son who was maybe 4 years old at the time that he said 'Oh, I know what you are talking about.' Then he proceeded to get down on the floor on his knees and elbows, feet off the ground and hands clasped together in a praying position at his forehead. I asked him where he learned that and he said 'I just remember it.'
    I found out later that certain monks pray that way and a psychic told me he was a monk in a past life.
    He's finally stopped just flopping to the ground wherever we are and praying like that. He's done this at school, walking down the street, at our Jewish temple. I like it but I think others think it is weird.
    Vicky
     
  3. Karma Tsring

    Karma Tsring New Member

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    My parents tell me i would make prostrations to the buddha that sat on our fire place for good luck only, my parents are not really religeous.
    Although i do not remember doing this,i do remember meditating deeply at a really young age.I wish i could clear my mind this way today but i can't and now i have a teacher.
    I wonder if it's right to cling to a past religeon as i find myself doing.
    It feels right...but then why am i wondering.
    Life is fast.
     
  4. shield

    shield Registered User

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    Hi Karma Tsring,

    I´m curious, did you experience yourself to be a young person here (short legs).

    That sounds like a great thing:)! I´m curious , what are there dfferent steps
    of initiation you take to come to that point?

    This last year I´ve found myself increasingly
    interested in buddhism as opposed to not being completely keen on it before. For some reason. A couple of months ago, though, I went to visit a Zen tempel in a nearby town and got a real nice impression. Had it been possible for practical reasons I probably would have started going to meditations and so on, there.

    The difference now is probably I don´t find the different ideological fine points stand in the way, just quite as much, of an experience of inner kinship
    E.g. my little thinkie mind-computer would prefer to see "God" as "the ultimate non-dual reality", etc. ( Funnily enough without being able to begin to fathom any of this :laugh: ). But... let it, huh:D.

    (Well, what I´m saying is, I think... it´s important to find and repect one´s own chosen tradition and path but not to let it stand in the way of what it´s actually aspiring to- spiritual freedom)


    I think it sounds very cool how you where meditating and seeing images of deities at a young age! Our daughter, who seems to have been living a life in India before this one used to do what looked like yoga when she was around 2-3 yrs old.

    I noticed in another thread you mentioned worries (if I remember rightly) about being sort of stuck in the memories of an earlier life as a Buddhist monk. I don´t know of course but, hey, I wouldn´t worry about that. Maybe it could be fruitful to see it as a picking-up of a life thread and going on again in new circumstances and with new challenges.

    I imagine in order for any spiritual tradition to stay alive it must, as well as being faithful to tradition, be in a sort of a constant evolution.

    Not the least in a general context of using past lives as a way of personal
    exploration I think it´s probably about loving and leaving the old grooves we´ve made... If that makes any sense:D.
     
  5. Josefina

    Josefina Senior Registered

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    Hi Karma Tsring, thank you for telling that story! Never have I heard anything the least kind of similar thing to my own experiences, though I'm quite sure that I as a monk lived a long time after my loved one had been burned at stake. But not "happy ever after"...

    But after many centuries stories do change, so it could be possible it was me but they remember it all in the wrong way... I must put down those places you mentioned and study them!

    :thumbsup:
     
  6. shield

    shield Registered User

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    That´s fascinating how similar the stories are... Josefina, please tell if there´s anything further there that rings a bell:).

    Karma tsring, here´s a book that you might enjoy (if you haven´t already read it):
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1582340455/002-8321636-3087219?v=glance&n=283155

    It´s a true story about a english woman becoming a tibetan buddhist nun,
    living in a mountain cave for 12 years meditating 15 hours a day :)eek: ;) ). I read it several years ago myself and was more than impressed.

    Here is her, Tenzin Palmo´s (and that of the nunnery she´s founded) website: http://www.tenzinpalmo.com/
     
  7. Josefina

    Josefina Senior Registered

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    Probably there have been many monks and novices who have had secret affairs, and where else one could had meet than in a forest at night... But I had a funny idea:

    When I was a child, I got an obsession about how I just must write books when I grow old. I actually have written some stories and even a whole novel, but what matters now is how old is this obsession about telling stories...?

    What if I told stories in my former life as a monk? I remember travelling quite a lot in the later part of my life. I do believe that I had lived as a child in southern England, and what happened to me, happened around there, but it's possible I later travelled here and there. I had met a young boy in my monastery, and I have an idea that I went and met him again about 30 - 40 years after. I have a vision about me as an old man, partially bald head, some white hear - probably I looked to a mirrow in that place I was visiting my old friend (who was 7 - 10 years younger than me).

    There is a castle that lookes a bit like one of my visions (although total regocnition hasn't occurred). It's the castle Beaulieu, and I guess it's not that far away from Cheshire? (Vision about a light brown wall with a round tower.)

    So, what if I told my story, what had happened to me, when I was meeting my old friend, but didn't tell that it happened to me? Told it as a legend, told that the man in it was killed?

    Anyway, I must check those places out in maps and pictures... But even if the story wasn't mine, the possibility that that kind of thing could happen is nice to know. (Well it wasn't nice when it happened, but to me it is one of the things that comforts my soul, when thinking about does death really exists?)
     
  8. GreenKnight

    GreenKnight Senior Registered

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    After a long time of not being able to post, I am back! And ready to catch up. I remember a life as a young monk in a Catholic monastery. Most monks there spent their days transcribing and illustrating books. I however was not allowed near the books. I worked the fields and tended to the livestock that fed the monastery. I was eventually poisoned by an older monk.
     
  9. shield

    shield Registered User

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    Josefina, I enjoy reading your musings about what might have gone on with your monk life. Kind of like how I do it myself, intuiting and zoning in. "What if...? How about...? Hmm...?":cool

    Greenknight, pleased to see you:). Very interesting about your monk life there... I´m curious do you know of any specific reason you weren´t allowed to work with the books (or just to young and lowly) and do you know why you were poisoned...?



    BTW for you and all other former monks that may be interested I found this site. It looks to be a real treasure chest of old (4th-20th ctry) christian writng. Greenknight, maybe you will find some of the books here, you weren´t allowed to read back then;).

    http://www.ccel.org/
     
  10. Josefina

    Josefina Senior Registered

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    To be a monk...

    I guess my father tought that I was no good in our shop, and because I had older brothers, there would be no room for me in the shop anyway after he would be gone.

    But the main reason, the reason of the soul, to be a monk to me was to not mess with sexuality, again. I needed some retirement from those things that happen between a man and a woman. I know that monks haven't always been so chaste as they should be, but I think that I was.

    :tongue:
     
  11. Persephone

    Persephone Persephone

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    Monk Anyone?

    Hej Sheild!

    You asked, "Monk anyone?"

    Yes! Well that is what I relived anyway. It was in England in about the late 1400s to mid 1500s. It wasn't a very happy life. I was homosexual, and to 'escape' I became a monk. Problem is you take yourself with you :(

    No, I never 'did' anthing, just beat myself up for being 'bad', and finally went crazy and was locked away. After the monasteries were disbanded (about mid 1500s) I lived alone as a hermit, copying manuscripts. It was very lonely and I died alone.

    Interestingly, two people who I know who also remembered that lifetime (one was a young knight, and the other a woman who came to me for confession) said that I had helped them. That was surprising to me, as I thought I had been too imersed in my own stuff to be able to help anyone else.

    What feels nice is that I seem to have worked through both the major themes in this life. Quite early on I was able to break away from a very repressive religious system, and become free.

    I was also able to work through my confusion about sexuality, by reliving and resolving early childhood sexual molestation in this life. Interestingly, even before I got to that, I was a campaigner for gay rights.

    So whatever that was about, I think I have got that one in the bag. Both those in the bag in fact. I sure hope so :) It feels good to look back and see how far we have come, doesn't it!

    I think from the life memories that came inbetween, that maybe I was working on those issues in little baby steps through several lives, but this life seems to have been the pivotal one in dealing with those two issues to resolution.

    There was a loneliness theme in that life time that I haven't resolved yet, but I know I am working on it.

    Have you had any more insights into your feelings around monks and monasteries? Feel free to share.

    Varma Hälsningar!
    Persephone
     
  12. zetascair20086

    zetascair20086 New Member

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    I had many lives as a shaman or religious figure, but as a priest/monk in the conventional sense, only a few times. I was an early Christian missionary in Egypt(Alexandria) and Ethiopia in the 300s and later was a Christian monk in either Greece or the British Isles in the 10th century, who died young of pnuemonia. I had wanted to die because my family had been killed but didn't kill myself out of fear. I just stayed outside all night, got sick from the cold and rain, and died shortly after. I was also a blind Buddhist monk killed by the Mongols and a Cather priest once, or possibly twice, in the 1200s.Finally I was a travelling renegade priest in the late 1500s who was imprisoned, tortured and burned at the stake for extreme heresy. I may also have been a minister briefly in the late 1600s.

    Although I don't much care for religion today, I do kind of like the priestly lifestyle of austerity and seclusion. I can still see the influence on my personality. Sort of a paradoxical like of the lifestyle, but not of the ideology. People often confide in me, I'm not very experienced relationship-wise and I'm a loner who likes reading and writing amongst other things that carried over. I also like the robes ;)
     
  13. Atlantis1

    Atlantis1 Senior Registered

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    I think I was a young servant to Monks

    I think probably Buddists monks. I was probably in training to be a monk myself ,but for some reason I never did become one. Either death or something else may have intervened. Can't tell for sure. I have always had an affinity towards buddhism though.
     
  14. GreenKnight

    GreenKnight Senior Registered

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    Thanks Shield -and everyone

    I think the reason for not being allowed near the books was probably youth and lowly origins. I was possibly an illiterate peasant with a huge yearning to learn. As to why I was poisoned, it's hard to say exactly. I suspect jealousy or the act of someone whose advances I rejected. I do remember parting from a young woman (my present wife) when I was taken away (unwillingly) to the monastery. This seemed to be somewhere in France.
     
  15. shield

    shield Registered User

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    Here´s an interesting modern monk worth checking out:cool:

    http://www.gratefulness.org/brotherdavid/bio.htm

    A "snippet":
    "The heart of every religion is the religion of the heart.[...]
    "Heart" stands here for that core of our being where we are one with ourselves, one with all, one even with the divine ground of our being. "Belonging" is therefore a key word for understanding the heart—the oneness of limitless belonging. A second key word is "meaning," for the heart is the organ for meaning. As the eye perceives light and the ear sound, the heart perceives meaning. Not in the sense of the “meaning” of a word that we might look up in a dictionary. Rather, “meaning” as that which we have in mind when we call an experience deeply meaningful. Meaning in this sense is that within which we find rest."
     
  16. Ailish

    Ailish Administrator Emerita

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    Hi GreenKnight,

    It's been a while since you originally posted about the monk.

    Have you found the time to do some research? :D Do you have anything new to share? I'm curious!



    Ailish :)
     
  17. Huifeng

    Huifeng New Member

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    I have only done one regression, where I was a catholic priest (from Ireland / England) in NW India from about 1850 ~ 1900, where I died. Most of the regression was on the last moments of that life.

    In this life, though still of european ancestry, I am a Buddhist monk. Although I speak fluent mandarin, and read the classic chinese Buddhist scriptures usually without too much problem, my main influence is still Indian. I am presently studying sanskrit, and it seems very natural to me.

    Peace.
    Huifeng :)
     
  18. Kolchak

    Kolchak New Member

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    Illiterati

    Lay Brothers were in fact known as Illiterati at one time because they often did not know how to read or write.
     

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