Past life in medieval times?

Discussion in 'Past Life Memories' started by -HM-, May 24, 2018.

  1. Ritter

    Ritter Senior Registered

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    Is this the kind of helmet you saw?

    [​IMG]

    I think this is around 1400 somewhere. High medieval period. It is called a bascinet. This one with the beak is specifically a pig face bascinet.
     
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  2. fireflydancing

    fireflydancing just a fly in the sky Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Hi @Shelby812

    Welcome to the forum!

    I like your stories, they are interesting.
     
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  3. Shelby812

    Shelby812 New Member

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    Thanks, fireflydancing.

    For a while there it was really in my face when things started to surface, but I didn't know about past lives then. When I was very young, I saw Sword in the Stone, thinking YES! I know that stuff! But it was 4th and 5th grade, the only two years I spent in an Episcopal school with him (J) where it was constant. All 4th grade we learned about the crusades. I don't know if my teacher was obsessed with them or if it was curriculum, but that was the dominant theme.

    5th grade wasn't as intense in that respect, but I had befriended his sister and our parents became friends, so we were at each other's houses a lot, oddly watching a lot of Robin Hood and Princess Bride type movies. I also went to school church every M/W/F, his Wednesday night church (sometimes) and my Sunday morning church. I'm now realizing how often I went then! I think the memories of looking out at the snow didn't start until I lived in a place with a ridiculous amount of snow, where as before there never was any. Even now, every time it snows, I get some of that vibe back.

    I also think age is a trigger too for PL memories, along with weather/location/stuff/etc. Maybe something REALLY intense happened some point in time when you were, say 13. The next life, when you reach age 13, the soul has some residual energy from the intense time and imprints that energy or memory on you now when you reach that age. Could be why memories appear at random and seem to fade just as quickly without warning.

    My favorite (and easiest) course was the medieval humanities course I took as an undergrad, the professor sang a song that was apparently a popular song for a few hundred years. I wish I could remember it. It wasn't a religious song, but a love song that people just sang when they were bored. Anyone know it? Something about a rose, I think.

    I've never delved into the Arabesque/Moorish one - I get the feeling it was very unpleasant and don't even want to go there. I probably should research though, could be interesting.
     
  4. Speedwell

    Speedwell Senior Registered

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    Something about a rose? Maybe "Rosebud in June"?
    Apparently it dates from about 1715. But that wouldn't be mediaeval, unless it was based on an older tradition. Probably several different versions of this may be found on youtube.
     
  5. Shelby812

    Shelby812 New Member

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    I listened to it, but I'm not sure. There is too much harmony I think. I looked and could only find There is No Rose about Mary that seems alright. Granted, the professor only sang a line or too, but it sounded "off" like most medieval music. He told us the Baroque began the harmonies we all know (C/E/G cords, etc) but the medieval's chords were all askew. It sounded right to THEM, but not to what we are used to. It was a pretty song alone, but I don't care for the "harmonies."

    This is the Medieval Babes singing it:
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2019 at 6:44 PM
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