Past Lives

Discussion in 'Past Life Memories' started by CanSol, Feb 26, 2018.

  1. CanSol

    CanSol Senior Member

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    Hey everyone,
    New guy on the block here, been lurking around for quite a while and just decided to sign up and get a bit active

    I have an unique gift that I have a close friend (my mother in my very first life) that can read someone's past lives, I have the ability as well as I've found out the hard way (picked up a PL of a friend without intention)
    A bit about me in this life: I'm 30, Canadian-Dutch, retired Canadian Army (3 tours in the Stan, appearently I never learn), since a few years paralysed from the waist down and appearently have nothing but time to sort out a few centuries.....

    Anyway I have a pretty long history as a militaryman and although I question similtanious lives, regression and feedback all point to it being correct

    My humble list (*sarcasm*)
    First life: I was born in Nijmegen the Netherlands during the Roman era, it was called Noviomagus then, was appearently quite rich but besides from a love for the city and knowing the general layout I have no memories, but was great in swordfighting growing up
    Late 1600's-Early 1700's: Russian Imperial Navy Captain of a 3 masted frigate
    Have some memories of this life
    Mid to late: 1800's Lakota killed at Little Bighorn, gunshot in the abdomen
    WWI: I was a Canadian SGT, saw battle at Beaumont-Hamel during the Somme, killed at Vimy, april 9, 1917
    Confirmed my ID earlier this year
    WW2: American 101st Airborne medic, confirmed my ID a few days ago
    These 2 PLs are the most vivid, I have the most memories of these 2 out of all my PLs and still cause issues in this life appearently
    Vietnam: I always had the feeling that I was a Marine Radio Operator, Khe Sanh and the Tet offensive are as obsessively researched as Vimy and 101st WWII history while I can ignore all other battles and info, watched plenty of docus but can't stand Khe Sanh or Tet docus to the point of getting sweaty and a sick feeling
    My other PLs are overlapping which caused some great confussion, to the point where I just ignored it till my friend did a regression and they came up again
    WWII: Dutch Soldier, killed on may 10, 1940 in the south, was a SGT in a border Regiment and killed when my trench shield disintegrated and a piece struck in my right temple, I have clear memories of this as well as the confirmed ID logs the exact reason of death
    The other confirmed and overlapping PL is that from the 1960's, I was a Russian enlisted submariner, killed when my boat sunk (surprisingly I'm not claustrophobic nor am I afraid of drowning)
    And then there's this life: 3 tour combat vet
    Conclussion: I've learned absolutely nothing of getting shot, blown up etc in the course of my many lives, atleast I managed to not get myself killed this time around....or just modern medicine, take your pick

    I've researched PLs running concurrent with each other and it's not as strange or impossible as I've thought it was

    The most difficulty I have is that I still seem to be searching for my WWI and WWII battle buddies, even here I read and check if there was a possibility that I recognize someone, strange nd a bit creepy, I know

    P.S sorry for making it such a long post
     
  2. KenJ

    KenJ Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Thanks for joining up here CanSol, you have some interesting memories. There are several others here that are re-living memories of their lives of fighting as you have probably observed. I look forward to hearing more details of your memories.
     
  3. Tinkerman

    Tinkerman Administrator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Hello CanSol! A hearty welcome. We are glad you found us. I too come from many lives as a warrior, the perspective is powerful. Please look around and jump in wherever you wish, I look forward to your thoughts.
    ~Tman
     
  4. CanSol

    CanSol Senior Member

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    I'm planning to take it one life at a time in order but with my mind jumping all over in daily life and with whatever the spirits plan it might end up mixed
    But the first 3 are basic and this wouldn't leave me alone so lives 1, 2 and 3

    Roman era: other than that I was appearently rich and a strong love for Nijmegen, that I still subconsiously call Noviomagus, it's first name given by the Romans, I remember zilch

    1700's: I see myself in Imperial Naval Dress Whites saying goodbye to my wife and 4 month old son, my wife, Elena, sits sobbing with her head in her hands почему (why) is all she asks
    next I'm on my ship checking a golden pocket watch on the bridge
    the last thing I remember is janking the rudder hard to port together with the helmsman

    Lakota 1876:
    I owned a black Mustang stallion
    this memory repeated itself for quite a while and was strongest during the hight of the Standing Rock demonstrations, my home in that life as well as a direct bloodline in this life
    I'm doing the Sundance ceremony followed by the Ínipi (sweatlodge, purification) ceremony (I checked the date for verification and it was held on june 5, 1876 in Rosebud creek, Montana)
    Then I'm in a forrest, on foot, I didn't want to risk losing my horse, I'm walking carefully near a stream, I can hear the water, I'm carrying both a rifle and bow and arrow, I don't have full confidence in my rifle
    I heard something so take cover and kneel down, when I cautiously look up and turn a little to my right a bullet enters my abdomen, I drop my rifle, fall forward (june 25 or 26, 1876), game over
     
  5. CanSol

    CanSol Senior Member

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    Moving on to WWI, hello trauma.....

    I was born near Aberdeen, Scotland in 1881, moved to Canada in 1903
    I had a wife and children, 3 daughters (including twins) and a son
    I had a decent job as a coal miner and was a member of the militia (it's now the Reserves for those that don't know) and ended up joining active service in january 1915 and went overseas in august 1915 as a private with the 18th Battalion CEF
    Upon arriving in England I was promoted to Sergeant and posted to a diffrent Regiment, The Royal Canadian Regiment, where I was made an instructor in bombing since I was appearently an expert at it

    I ended up in the trenches, I only have memories of the Somme and Vimy but it's a given that between late 1915 when I arrived overseas and april 9, 1917 that I've had my share of rotations in the trenches of the Western Front
    What I remember from the Somme is mainly that it was hot, Canada entered the line in august 1916
    In the trenches it was mostly boredom, guys played cards, wrote or read letters and vilt, a lot of vilt, no matter what we did we couldn't get comfortable
    I sometimes risked looking over the top to see what we were up against, what I saw was a pretty flat no man's land and thinking that we don't stand a chance of reaching the enemy lines, we'd be mowed down
    I have no recollection of that battle but I made it out of that grinder and according to my military records without serious injury

    After the Somme we moved into the line at Vimy, a diffrence between day and night, the mud was a constant hell, walking was extremely difficult and where I was cursing the heat at the Somme it's now the cold and miserable weather that got more than it's fare share of colourfull language
    we practiced, man did we practice, day in day out the same thing, trying to perfect it for zero hour, then there were the trench raids, the highlight of the night, going over the top trying to be quiet while boots sunk in mud creeping over to the boche, the goal: get intel on the conditions of the barbed wire, trench conditions and strength of defense, if you were lucky you grapped a few of the enemy for interrogation
    This was a constant repeat for months, well the practice anyway, the raids were done by various troops
    Then it's the morning of the 9th, easter monday, and it was COLD!
    The Arty been throwing lead for days and nights on end to soften the enemy lines, we were huddled in the forward trenches filled with freezing water and feeling downright miserable, all we wanted was to go over the top, even if only to get out of this dump and forget the cold for the time being
    When the guns silence (appearently they had their own act to prepare for zero hour) we got ready, did our final equipment check and I got my guys together, going over the plan one last time, I distinctly remember passing up on the rum, wanting to keep my head clear and i'm telling my men "hug the barrage and whatever happens to me, stick to the plan"
    Zero hour, the guns open up, I check my watch (a brass pocket watch....again with the pocket watch) where with the past barrage one could still distinguish each caliber now it was one big roar, the air was vibrating and we barely heard the whistle that signaled the jump off time
    We head over the top, the snow made it difficult to see where we were, where my man were and where we were going at first but then we caught a lucky break and the wind shifted so now the snow was hitting the boche directly instead of us from the side
    the going was relatively easy, I was surprised at the lack of enemy small arms and arty fire coming our way and I think that it made some of us over confidend, atleast I was, some of our guys made such good gains that they ended up getting hit by our own barrage, that was as good a reminder to keep your head in the battle if there was any
    I looked around to my small bomber party, we were the main assault tasked to throw Mills bombs in the enemy trenches, all were still good in line and properly spaced, I remember urging them on as we got nearer the trenches, that's when disaster struck and I got killed, I remember looking a very young private in the eyes who was having a hard time mentally and then it was all over for me, must've stepped on a mine.....
    I don't remember the exact details as to how I died but it was quick
    I'm buried at Pas de Calais cemetary in France

    What I ended up with in this life from my WWI history is an intense hatred for bully beef/corned beef, I can NOT eat it to the point where it makes me physically ill and chlorine, especially as a kid when just smelling one drop of it made me vomit and ill for days, the RCR were in areas where gas was used by the Germans
    It's also likely that me being unable to have anything on my throat, not even a very loose scarf, because I get the feeling I'm suffocating stems from this lifetime

    I visited Vimy Ridge memorial when I was part of the Canadian Forces Nijmegen Marches contingent and a visit there is tradition, we were guided over the battlefields, in the tunnels and I felt so familair there, traced my hand over the walls and got some powerfull memories there, visiting the memorial itself I checked for my relatives of this life that are ingraved there as well as my unit members (both of the 18th and the RCR) that are still listed as MIA and breaking down mourning their loss as well as my own wondering if I wasn't busy checking my squad I might not have been killed but then I realized that it's a trait that's both from myself and of NCMs, the unit before myself
    The rest of the contingent didn't think much of me checking for missing 'Royals' since I served in that same regiment in this life

    next up, one or both of my WWII lives
     
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  6. Jim78

    Jim78 Senior Registered

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    Hi CanSol. I've found that if I focus on the through lines from life to life, talents, habits, tactics and such, that this inverted back into myself throws a light on my psychology in all of my lives. Its showed me the aspects that I'm still working on in my current life. It showed me why I had to fight.

    I'm just saying that on finding the commonalities in my soul from life to life it showed me what I still need to work on and how those motivations and traits informed my choices in my current life. Kind of like drawing a road map of my souls journey. After years of searching for clarity amid the confusion of why I fought again and again its only after joining this forum and talking to its members that I gained some understanding of why I am who I am.

    Its a good idea to examine your relationships in your various lives too if you can remember some of them. They can show you much about your learning process in my experience.

    Good luck in your journey.
     
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  7. Jim78

    Jim78 Senior Registered

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    Hi. I left out the most important thing I learned CanSol. Belief. Not so much what you believed but why you believed it. I've found that in all of my lives, whether I was fighting for love or country I believed in being a warrior or a soldier. This informed my choices in all of my lives. Obviously it manifested in different iterations but my core belief in being a warrior or a soldier was the same in every life. I only remembered my past lives after my core belief was rattled though. I don't know if you can remember what your core belief was in your various lives though.
     
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  8. CanSol

    CanSol Senior Member

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    My core beliefs have always been Duty, Honour, Valour and I fight not because it's what I'm ordered to do or because it's 'the right thing' but to defend my family, friends and the weak, as thacky as that may sound and for those next to and behind me
     
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  9. Jim78

    Jim78 Senior Registered

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    That doesn't sound tacky to me CanSol. It sounds like the distilled essence of a warrior soul. My core belief in my role as a warrior also manifested such aspects as you describe into my various lives. I've discovered that it informed all aspects of my thinking and behaviour, both my successes and failures. But I've also found, that for me personally, what I was manifesting was an internal struggle, a battle between the various manifestations of my core belief, both good and bad. In other words I've been left with my own crap to deal with. I'm battling to completely surrender my core belief and become a man of peace not war. Its the hardest struggle I've ever had. I'm still fighting in my life even today because I never fully learned how to surrender. PL memories and exploring them have shown me that I've gone to war in life after life because I don't know how not to fight. That's the new path of learning laid out before me.

    I have no doubt that your beliefs manifested different circumstances to mine in your various incarnations so I would be interested in what you discover runs through them that brings you back to conflict again and again. If I were to put a name to my motivation it would be stubbornness.
     
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  10. CanSol

    CanSol Senior Member

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    Welcome to the club, I'm as stubborn as a mule in some aspects and I too don't know what it's like not to fight
    I'm still fighting now, not a war between nations but for accessibility
    And patientce, boy do I miss just taking the stairs because they're faster or running a quick errand, always seeming to need that thing on the top shelf, oh the joys of being a wheelie.....
     
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  11. Jim78

    Jim78 Senior Registered

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    Sorry for your trouble CanSol.

    It was good to hear about your Somme recollections. I didn't fight in WW1 but I did have a life during that period and my current life great uncle died at the Somme. He was nineteen. You reminded me of him.
     
  12. KenJ

    KenJ Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    CanSol, I had not said anything about disability to you before, but I want you to know that I understand. I use to be six foot-one and able to look over the sheving is stores, now I can't reach those top shelves. I don't know how long it has been for you, but it took me about five years to be comfortable with my new circumstances - not that I don't wish for some of those lost abilities at times. It took me three years to find and get a vehicle that I could drive; finely able to do things on my own after that.
     
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  13. CanSol

    CanSol Senior Member

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    It's approaching the 4 year mark this year but accepting my wheels wasn't a big issue, I grew up with plenty of wheelies (Spina Bifida, Cerebral Palsy, of which I was born with a mild form with, got good at hiding it, now not so much) and spend a lot of time wheeling around during my childhood, it's just frustrating that over here, I moved to the Netherlands for family, is pretty low on accessibility in public buildings and transport, that's just hard to deal with sometimes
    I still play hockey, but instead of wearing skates I'm now in a sled, "Improvise, Adapt, Overcome" level: expert o_O so I generally don't look at what I can't but what I can do
     
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  14. Jim78

    Jim78 Senior Registered

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    Its funny that you were in WW1, WW2 and Vietnam CanSol, but I'm unclear on something. Were you a casualty of war in all of those lives? Have you any inkling why you had to keep dying until your current life? You must have got something right this time in my opinion.
     
  15. CanSol

    CanSol Senior Member

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    I was Killed april 9, 1917 at Vimy Ridge
    april 1945 in Germany
    and april 4, 1968 during the siege of Khe Sanh
    I came close to dying in september 2006 in Afghanistan but a quick medivac and modern medicine saved my life so I think that that's the diffrence as to why I'm still alive today
     
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  16. Jim78

    Jim78 Senior Registered

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    Interesting. I died in an ambush during the Irish civil war. I died because I compromised for peace but also because I ordered my men to fight when it would have been wiser to drive on. I compromised for peace in my current life too and I still kept fighting the smaller fight. I'm expecting that to come around and bite me in the rear any day now. I've made the same choices and mistakes again.

    I think destiny or fate or whatever it is is informed by our choices. Too many random coincidences have happened to me that have had meaning and destiny attached to it. It's strange, what with how chaotic life seems. It makes me wonder if its all predetermined or if we have free will. What I'm saying is that I believe your alive for a reason.
     
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  17. CanSol

    CanSol Senior Member

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    While I'm here I might as well get on with my 2 WWII lives
    both have been confirmed by someone that can read past lives so that cleared up mainly my confusion of 'double lives'

    The shortest one and first one killed first
    He was a drafted poorly trained and equiped Dutch Army Soldier born in the south of the Netherlands and stationed at the border with Germany also in the south
    I was a groupcommander and killed during the opening part of the invasion on may 10, 1940
    The only recollection that I have of this life is close to and the moment of my death
    I remember the general alarm going off, checking my pocket watch for the time to make sure it wasn't just another drill and ordering my section to the trenches, we lined up and set up a trenchshield (a piece of metal you put up and have just enough holes in it to stick your piece of junk rifle in and see through it to shoot at the enemy
    this piece of metal is exactly what got me killed, grenades were thrown all around at us, one of those hit my shiled, it fragmented, I feel one piece of scrapnel hitting my left shoulder just before a piece hit me in my right temple and then all goes black and I'm done with that life

    The other WW2 life is that of a medic in the 101st and from this life stem my earliest PL memories, sorry if they jump from one part to the next because it's not 100% recollection and my memories just skip between times
    I remember looking over at Ellis Island, NY (Statue of Liberty for those not familiar with the area) wondering if I'm going to make it back,
    The tent camps in England, muddy at times from the rain and thinking back that it was just like the previous war, except that we had tents (no this wasn't e thinking back in the current life but flashing back when I was at the camp)
    I spend a lot of time shining my jump boots (probably for going out and it's something that relaxes me, still does to this day) and going over my medic and musette bag making sure that I have all the essential equipment

    Then it's D-Day, I'm standing in a C-47 Dakota, second in the stick looking out and seeing the Ack Ack (Anti Aircraft) ammo bursting and planes going down, I'm getting more antsy as time goes on just wanting out before we burst into flames, then the green light switches on and we're off, finally
    I feel a tug, look up to check if my chute opened properly, check my boots to see if I haven't rammed straight through my boots (can't describe that feeling) and looking around, I feel surprisingly calm now that I'm out of the plane and floading down despite the ammo still going of all around me, I see chutes everywhere
    Then I land, in the middle of a pitch black forest and have no clue where I am, so I start walking, gotta find somebody at some point right? or atleast something I recognize from the briefings but no luck, just end up on a road and decided to follow that, I see light in the distance, from the burning buildings so there must be something there
    I end up in a town square, I found a rag tag group of paras along the way and together we set out, what's a medic only armed with a revolver gonna do on it's own?
    The highest ranked was an 82nd Technical SGT and we discovered roughly where we were, in or near Carentan and we headed north, we had to get to Ste Come du Mont where the DZ was supposed to be for one of the 506th battalions, since that was the closest we could get to a Rendes Vous ppint, that's where we were headed
    We're walking along the streets being carefull of Jerry when a shot goes out and 'MEDIC!' sounds, I dash over and see the guy is shot in the right side of the neck, I apply a field dressing and morphine but there's nothing to be done to save him and we have to leave him behind

    This is where it cuts of and I head to Holland in my memories
    The jump went ok, atleast we hit our DZ this time, but the landing was a bit of an issue
    When I landed the wind shifted and caught my chute, had to fight a bit to get it down and my medic bag got tangled with the risers, while fighting to gain control of my chute and untagle my bag I sprained my right wrist and so had my first 'casualty' to threat in Holland, myself, nothing serious, just applied a bandage for support and went on with it
    There isn't much that I remember after this, just that after the battle we stayed at a farm near Kesteren and when I was there in this life and was supposed to go to a camp site, the farm is the first thing I walk up to despite it being about a click (1km) further than the camp, I was actually was amazed that it was still there
    I toured the Dutch battle sites quite a few times, walked the Nijmegen marches 8 times, which goes through A LOT of the Market Garden area but nothing that triggered my memories there

    Bastogne:
    I just remember how awefully cold and hungry I was, how I designed all kinds of things to keep my hole just a little bit warm and really fell in love with the tanker jacket that I had and ok the how I got it part may be less than legal I wouldn't trade it for ANYTHING, in this life I still find myself wishing I had it, maybe get a decent repro? because it's proven to be a great jacket for extremly cold weather

    Germany:
    No recollection what so ever but you could pay me a million bucks cash and I still won't go into the Rhine area willingly, I've been to Germany but the Rhine area? absolutely not, I once was near Dusseldorf and it was a downright sickening experience
    The reason: I was killed in the area and from the reaction it was even more traumatic than Vimy Ridge or the south of Holland where I can be around without severe reactions (other than the occaissional flashbacks)

    I've been to Normandy in 2012, and been to the exact areas that I passed through on D-Day and the rest of the campaign
    Visited Juno beach and Juno beach Centre, merville battery (highly recommended IF you don't have a PL directly traced there)
    but St Come du mont, Carentan and Colleville-sur-mer left deep imprints
    One day we were placed in a van with darkened windows and blindfolded and proveded to be 'dropped' at intervals, I was one of the last to get kicked out and I was in the middle of a forest, pitch black and I did what I did back in 1944, started walking, but instead of going back to were my unit should be I followed the accect route and ended up on a road that was the exact road that led to Carentan, I decided to wait there and see if the others would find me, they did and got chewed out for not going back to assamble (hey i was at the assemble point, the rest was just slow to catch on :rolleyes:)
    Colleville-sur-mer cemetery, boy was that fun..... *sarcasm*
    That's where I broke down completely and didn't know the reason till I met Donald Burgett in the centre of Ste Come du mont the next day, Donald was a member of my company and he was telling the group that he just got back from the cemetery at Omaha beach and how difficult it was to see a lot of his friends buried there, mystery solved :(

    But does anyone notice a theme here? guess what I've had with me in the Stan and lost in september 2005?
     
  18. CanSol

    CanSol Senior Member

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    I don't believe in coincidences Jim and somehow everything happens for a reason
     
  19. CanSol

    CanSol Senior Member

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    On to the final segment,my last past lives, the 1960's
    I don't remember much about either of them

    Soviet submariner
    My name was Dimitri
    I was stationed in Kamchatka and Vladivostok Russia
    was a helmsman
    and my boat sunk in 1968, I know the nr but that whole life seems to be marked "classified, don't open folder" so I'm not gonna post the boat info lest WWIII break out, it's appearently still a hot subject

    Vietnam
    I always reacted to the nickname Smitty, somehow I knew it wasn't my last name, my father in this life has the same one but was neve called Smitty, nor was I and I have my mother's last name
    I entered the service in 1967, completely voluntary, went to MCRD Parris Island
    I'm a Marine Radio Op from New Jersey, still remember the weight of it and the procedures of transmitting/receiving
    I switched units, I went from the 1/9 (the walking dead) to the 2/12, this I know from the info I uncovered, I always had a strong pull towards the 1/9
    I was killed by a RPG during the siege of Khe Sanh in 1968, just thoughts and feelings that I had

    I love Hueys and like Dakota planes, I could hear one coming and knew what was flying over before I was old enough to even know what a helicopter or plane was, let alone the exact type....or should anyway and my parents never knew why I started crying when I heard a Huey or Dakota fly over
    still love both of them
    even to this day after watching plenty of movies about Nam, the mention of Khe Sanh and Tet make my blood run cold
     
  20. CanSol

    CanSol Senior Member

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    Anyone else know that moment that out of nowhere something just clicks?
    I was just scrolling around, bored and unable to find sleep, the usuall when something clicked in relation to my Nam life
    I knew I was a Radio Operator and bounced around in various infantry units, no idea why untill just now when a massive lightbulb turned on

    I was the Radio Op to the Arty FOO (for you non military in this life that's short for Artillery Forward Observing Officer, the one that can accurately control barrages) stationed in Cam Lo, I was killed in a barrage while on a hill during Operation Pegasus
    The option that I could've been attached to an FOO should've clicked sooner given that we had a few of those on my tours in the sandbox in this life and the connection between being posted to an Arty unit while bouncing around different (2) infantry units should've been easy to spot

    I checked the records and it all checked out, I was killed on a hill in relief of Khe Sanh, that was called Op Pegasus
    Appearently I was hit by a 122mm shell
    The records aren't solid either, some list me in one unit, others in a different one and yet another gives 2 units that I served in during 4 long months in country

    It's nearing my date of death for 3 of my lives, all in early april so it's wait and see which one and which memories surface, at the moment it's Nam, I'm just hoping that I won't get a repeat performance like last year during Vimy's 100 anniversary, THAT was definately not fun (unless you count the memory of the idiot looking for half a deck of cards that he lost, probably under the boards)
     

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