recommended episode from a t.v. series (espacially for who were in ww2)

Discussion in 'Members Lounge' started by Souldier, Jul 9, 2019.

  1. Souldier

    Souldier Senior Registered

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    I wanted to highly recommend the episode "tribunal" from the science fiction series "the outer limits".

    it has a strong message from about healing after such a tragedy. tell me what do you think - I, personally, came up in tears as the episode ended.

     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2019
  2. Owl

    Owl Super-alt Mitglied

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    This is the first and only episode I watched of the Outer Limits. Thanks for posting it, I just re-watched it. The more I think about it, the more that I realize that the idea of time travel has always been present in this life, and I have always been particularly sensitive with past, and future interacting in the present, all in one moment. I' ll put some thoughts in spoilers to not ruin it for the ones who have not seen it.

    Before re-watching the episode and from what I remembered from it, I thought that I would feel something at the end, when the father is presented with his living-dead child. After all, how cool would it be to just be able to bring dead people from the past, to the present like that? But to my surprise, I felt something even stronger when they opened the box with Rademacher's papers, for a split second, it even felt past-lifeish, like when you see or you remember something that you thought it was forever lost. Something that's not supposed to be there, yet it is.
    As for Rademacher, he wasn't a very enlightened man (not even as an old man). If he would have had the slightest wit he wouldn't have committed suicide in that manner. Doesn't his young self have some curiosity on how the old man knows those details? Why be so quick on the trigger? Can't his older self think of something better to say than an embarrassing childhood anecdote?

    I personally didn't see much about healing (except that the father rebuilt his life), more about revenge. And revenge not even from the father, which would have been somewhat justified, but from the son, who didn't even live the Holocaust. The father actually was quite chill...
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2019
  3. Souldier

    Souldier Senior Registered

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    the revenge might be a part of the healing. And a revenge doesn't have to hurt directly the one who hurt you, but it can be also to overcome the difficulties and pain and grow from the ashes.


    I think what got me emotional is thinking about the possibility to bring back from the past people who already left us forever. I wish it was possible. a time period disappears with the people who lived it are dead. well, maybe not completely disappears because reincarnated souls can remember their past life.

    as about what you described in the spoiler - thatsc an interesting feeling. do you have an idea why you felt it at that moment?
     
  4. Owl

    Owl Super-alt Mitglied

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    But overcoming the difficulties and grow from the ashes would be healing, not revenge. Hopefully people reading at this point would have already watched the episode or don't care about the spoilers. I say it was revenge in this case because initially they wanted to make Rademacher pay for his crimes in a tribunal, as many Nazi hunters say, that they don't want revenge, they want the world to hear the truth. However, when that didn't work out, they just simply wanted to shoot him, but since that would create troubles for them, they simply made him shoot himself. The only "truth" that they got is that the old man was indeed Rademacher, nothing else. Revenge implies someone else suffering, if someone simply overcomes the difficulties, that's not revenge, I don't think that after 50 years Rademacher would have been particularly troubled by them living their life. I did read survivors though saying that so and so would be suffering so much knowing that they had a happy life after the Holocaust, but I think that's their fantasy or what they want to believe for their own healing or process, on the other end I don't think So and so cares too much about what they're doing.

    Yes, people never really leave, do they? For good or for bad.

    Maybe I' m a materialistic bastard, I don't know. While I don't like him as a character for many reasons, I still can't help identifying with Rademacher in the story. I probably just extrapolated and imagined if those were my things instead of his.

    There's something that I forgot to mention which, even after watching the last scene many times I failed to see before. Where he is brought to Auschwitz as an old man he says "This is a nightmare". I guess the commandant wasn't too happy in the camp either during that time?
     
  5. Eva1942

    Eva1942 An Ancient Egyptian Queen..

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    In my WWII lifetime I wanted revenge on many people. I held so much anger for people who had taken things from me that I felt a uncontrollable need for revenge against them. I did get some of it fulfilled in 1944 by helping the Allies in the Auschwitz-Birkenau Underground. In June 1942, when a close friend had told me about the destruction of Lidice and everything that had happened there (awful things), I blurted out angrily: " Good, now someone knows how it feels to have someone ripped away from them so unfairly". They were stunned at my words, because I had said them in such anger and spite.

    In this lifetime, when I had discovered what these people had done to me, I still had that need for revenge and being angry. But then I learned that being angry and wanting revenge on these people still was not part of my healing, in fact it more or less hampered it. That being angry at these people hurt no one but myself. I didn't want to forgive them for what they did to me or my loved ones, but I still forgave them.

    When I was writing this, all those things came back to me. What these people did to me and my loved ones, but now I know that they are repaying those actions in their own way.

    Eva x
     
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