Scotland

Discussion in 'Past Life Memories' started by tanguerra, Jun 12, 2010.

  1. tanguerra

    tanguerra Administrator

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    There is something going on with me and Scotland that I don't fully grasp myself as yet.

    Lately, I keep flashing into Scotland, during a period some 300-400 years or so ago. Some of my earliest (in this life) past life memory experiences are from that time and place. Indeed, my first ever post on the forum was on that subject.

    This is another one I wrote fairly early on describing another Scottish experience:

    I have remembered various (mostly quite disturbing) battle scenes from that time, which I don't need to trouble everyone else with (just take my word for it :eek:). But I haven't been able to get any further into this particular Scottish life. As is often the way, it feels as though it is 'on the tip of my tongue' but I just can't get to it. There must be more (there always is) but I don't know what it is.

    I was reading some of Charles Stuart's writings about 'The Bonny Prince', etc. and all of that just gives me 'goosebumps' for want of a better word. I'm sure it must have been about that time. The 'Skye Boat Song' "Speed bonny boat, like a bird on the wing over the sea to Skye...." has always made me feel teary from early childhood for no good reason...

    Last night I was talking to someone about the film 'Highlander' and I remembered how it made me feel all strange and goosebumpy when it came out, 20 or more years ago. Not just the swords and battles and all (me being me) but the theme of 'immortality' - especially the love story bit ... Of course, it's rather a silly film really (although you have to love the soundtrack by Queen). But there was something about this guy and his secret 'other life' that appealed to me and I certainly identified with. Back then (20 years ago) I had not really looked into what was going on with me and the whole 'reincarnation' thing, but the film certainly touched me in many ways. I remember being absolutely moved and excited by it - the idea of being 'immortal' and somewhat world weary with it and the feeling that those you love die and disappear, but you go on and so forth somehow touched a deep chord in me at the time. This evening I was just messing about looking for a clip of the film... and again with the 'waterworks'. :(

    I don't even know what I'm trying to describe, but something is coming up in my 'subconcious' - that's for sure! No doubt (probably) it has something to do with my friend X I get that 'vibe' ... I will have to ponder on it more deeply. A few times in the past couple of weeks I have tried meditating on it, but my mind just refuses to cooperate and wants to skip away, so it's probably something 'dire' .... Hey ho. :)

    Highlander: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6c75cOL0G8I
     
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  2. tanguerra

    tanguerra Administrator

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    I've just been poking around and I think, judging by the clothing, the 'vibe' and so forth, that all this must have been around some time before the Battle of Culloden (1740s).


    http://www.nts.org.uk/Culloden/PPF/BeforeCulloden/


    Certainly I remember a lot of battles and we were winning them on the whole, whereas Culloden was a massive defeat for 'The Bonny Prince' (and the poor old soldiers of course bore the brunt).


    Maybe that terrible defeat at Culloden is the battle I remembered in the story above? I read that the bagpipes and such were henceforth banned by the Brittish after Culloden, along with wearing the kilt and tartans and such, so maybe that's why something about the bagpipes (and Scottish dancing and other displays of 'nationalism') so excited me back in my childhood somehow? Certainly I have taken a look at some images of the field of Culloden and it kind of looks familiar, but a field is a field after all - they tend to look a bit alike.


    Interesting anyway. I was never much interested in politics back then and probably wouldn't have understood it too well anyway, but I wonder why now all of a sudden this is top of mind? No doubt all will be revealed in due course...
     
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  3. Tinkerman

    Tinkerman Administrator

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    Hello Tanguerra, dear friend. Reading this gave me some goosebumps! I too have an uncanny allure to this time and Scotland. I have no clue why...only an emotional pull. A year or two ago I was fortunate to go to a concert put on by the "Black Watch." I had no idea who they were or what music they played, I was simply invited in a spur of the moment kinda thing. I believe I wrote about that night somewhere here on the forum. Any way as the house light went down one could hear in the distance a lone bag piper playing...the music seemed to be getting closer, and close growing in volume and then more and more pipers joined in and all of the sudden they were filing in to the auditorium from every direction and I was so overwhelmed emotionally that I wanted to cry in some exhilarating way. The lady in front of me did break down! Oh man! It was powerful.


    There have been many facets of my life that have drawn me to the Celtic and Scottish times. Yet to this day I have no clue why. It seems to be a major trait of my soul, of that I'm sure. And YES, those movies all speak loudly too me. Braveheart leaves me teary eyed and nostalgic everytime. i so want to know more...and I'm certain sooner or later it'll hit me. OR maybe it already has and I'm too cluttered to see it


    Thanks for sharing this!!


    Tman
     
  4. tanguerra

    tanguerra Administrator

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    Thanks Tinkerman.


    Last night I was going to sleep and thinking about this and tears started rolling down my cheeks. I tried to work out what the sadness was and all I could get was a feeling of at the moment of death in that life, which I think must have occurred during a battle, that I was terribly sad that I would never see my 'sweetheart' again although I had promised I would come home. Perhaps more information will come to light before long.
     
  5. Nightrain

    Nightrain Senior Registered

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    I still have the tartan from the days when I reenacted as a member of the 84th Highland Immigrants of 1778. (No, we didn't have underwear) :thumbsup:
     
  6. ChrisR

    ChrisR Administrator

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    Thanks for sharing tanguerra :thumbsup:


    Although I don't believe that our lives are mapped out for us in every detail before we are born, I do believe that certain 'markers', or 'waypoints' are put in place, and then how we reach them is down to us. We walk through life using our free will, but I do believe in an invisible 'divine hand' that gently nudges us onto a certain course towards these 'life lessons'.


    Sometimes I think these memories that seem to surface for no apparent reason, often do so just before you are about to meet someone important from that past life, or just before you are about to reach one of these small milestones in your life?


    Just one of my theories : angel


    Chris
     
  7. tanguerra

    tanguerra Administrator

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    Yes Chris. I think there is definitely something going on. I have been thinking about it all a bit today but I haven't got any really clear insights. I just have a generally 'upset' feeling about the whole thing. Going over my personal timeline I'm pretty sure that was the last life I spent doing any fighting as such. It's the last time I remember being male for sure. Ever since then I'm pretty sure I've been female (if you view time in a straight line).


    I know I was well and truly sick of it all (fighting) by then. Certainly I was very good at it and I remember various battles when I was more than competent at it (gory details you don't need to know). I remember teaching younger men how to fight, but I get a feeling of the 'weariness' of it all - or maybe 'disgust' is a better word...


    I most certainly don't glorify war or fighting in any way now (or then). It is a very primitive and stupid way of settling differences after all. I don't actually feel any kind of romanticism about 'Bonny Prince Charlie', bagpipes or kilts or any of that stuff. There was nothing 'romantic' about it if you were there, after all.


    Part of why the Highlander film touched me though (apart from the battles in kilts and all that) is to do with the way the hero lived with his 'secret' - his immortality. That is certainly part of it. I have felt like a bit of an outsider since I can remember with this strange ability I have of remembering past lives and the need to hide it from people and try to act normal and fit in so as not to startle people. The majority of people, after all have no idea that they too are immortal. They worry about death and fuss about silly things and are afraid of all kinds of nonsense and don't know the difference between what is important in life and what is immaterial (which is material things on the whole...) I find it a bit tedious sometimes to smile and pretend to sympathise with some levels of the silliness that goes on. I'm not complaining. I'd rather have it than not have it, but still... sometimes it is a bit isolating not being able to talk about it. Thank goodness for you guys! :)


    There is something deeper again lurking I know, but it will float up all by itself in time. It usually does.
     
  8. Tinkerman

    Tinkerman Administrator

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    Tanguerra and others, as I reread this thread and pondered the "big picture" I wonder if what we are doing is recalling our past lives in a nebulous fashion because the emotion of those times was so powerful. What I seem to believe is that these eras were closing times. They were the end of certain cultures and the beginnings of others. As I think of the destruction, murder and rape of certain peoples the sadness and anxiety of those last warriors touches my very core. The falling tribes of Scotland, The last days of the great societies: Rome, Greece, heck even the Aztec...the destruction of America's Native people, all were epic in their destruction. For those last peoples, seeing their way of life end must have been traumatic.


    The past lives I know of involve the end of a society or a way of life. The Scottish, the native American and in some ways my pioneering grandfather who fled Europe and his homeland of Germany as the terror of poverty war and disease decimated his home. My greatest sadness to this day is remembering them, my loved ones and a beautiful way of life, marred by the erosion humankind.


    Tanguerra I shared those tears with you today. This morning was especially difficult...so many ethereal spirits tugging at my soul. Must be the weather:rolleyes:.


    Tman
     
  9. tanguerra

    tanguerra Administrator

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    Hi Tinkerman,


    I was thinking this morning about geopolitics and 'karma' funnily enough, cause and effect: bad behaviour and consequent suffering. I was reading an article about General David Petraeus (in Vanity Fair - as you do). On the whole he seems like an intelligent and sincere enough sort of a person doing a difficult job to the best of his considerable ability.


    I was pondering the mindset of the 'warrior'; his place in the world, why we still need them (we do, sadly) and so forth. I don't want to get into any arguments about rights and wrongs or go into a specific political debate, but I was thinking about how countries reap what they sow, just as people do by their actions, sometimes not right away - sometimes many 'lifetimes' later. For example, the current conflicts going on between the US and its allies in the Middle East have their seeds in foreign policy (and business) decisions made over the past 100 years or more. Really these conflicts have their roots in unfairness and inequity which began long ago, not to mention general animosity dating back to the crusades...


    War is a horrible, expensive and brutal way to try to settle issues. It seems though, that we have to keep learning these lessons again and again each generation. The 'public' often appears to be supportive of the idea of a war at the start. Enthusiasm is easily whipped up with speeches and streamers, flags and parades. The drums of national pride begin to beat in every chest. But they soon change their tune when confronted by the reality of it, when the coffins start coming home, when the wounded - walking and otherwise - begin to return.


    Wars, just as the struggle between England and Scotland was, are always about money in the end. The money, of course, is ultimately about power. It would be nice if one fine day we could work out a better way to distribute resources (and power) equitably, rather than by taking them from others by force just because we can. How much suffering could be averted? The tears of how many widows and parents would be saved?


    At least though, back in the days of Bonnie Prince Charlie, the king would often actually ride out to battle with his men and often be accompanied by his own sons. Even if they tended to keep a safe distance from the front line, at least they could see the war with their own eyes. Maybe more modern leaders should be compelled to do this and we would see less inclination to find military solutions to economic issues? Surely it's time we moved beyond that kind of thing?


    I don't know, just some musings.
     
  10. tanguerra

    tanguerra Administrator

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    This afternoon I went out to listen to a band with some friends. Before the band began they were tuning up and plugging in and so on and the fiddle player and the drummer started just messing around with a Scottish folk tune, just for fun (they usually play more sort of western swing / pop type of music). I thought, good heavens this Scottish thing is following me around!


    Anyway a few minutes later a big, tall man walked in carrying a baby in a back pack thing. I thought, Aw, how cute! (as you do). Then the man lifted the little child up and something about this big guy and the way he so tenderly lifted the little child out of the backpack and held him in his arms made my eyes fill up with tears. I realised it was not just my 'sweetheart' that I knew I would never see again back then in Scotland, but also my little son. I had to pretend I had something in my eye for a minute or two until I could get hold of myself.
     
  11. Jody

    Jody Senior Registered

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    Hi, Tanguerra, I've had experiences much like yours. When I was little, I made something like a kilt for my older brother's GI Joe action figure (how's that for playing with dolls? :laugh:) And who can help but be stirred by the sound of skirling bagpipes and the martial roll of drums? If there's any kind of sound that will haunt you from life to life it's that.


    When I was an adolescent I listened to the Thistle and Shamrock all the time (it's a public radio show that features Celtic Music, and it's still on the air after 25 years! :) ) Listening to this old folk music, esp. music about the Jacobite uprisings, caused me to experience snippets of 3 different past lives -- the earliest being a life where I fought in the Jacobite uprising of 1745. If you read Charles Stuart's Descendant of Kings you know that up until Culloden the Jacobites pretty much were winning every battle ... so were you in that uprising, too?


    I must admit I've been thinking a lot about that time myself since I read Charles's account not long ago. There is something particularly poignant and sad about that time, as Tinkerman said, it really represented the death of a whole way of life for the highlanders. The clan system was dismantled, and the highlands and islands were cleared for raising sheep.


    Maybe one of the reasons this stuff is coming up now is that Western civilization is facing another end point soon. At least that's how I feel about it. Our way of life has become unsustainable. (I guess I better stop now before I go on some political rant ... :rolleyes:)
     
  12. Aaab

    Aaab Registered

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    I also feel connections with Scotland.


    I have a hearing defect that means it can be difficult for me to hear correctly when conditions are not perfect such as when there is extrainious noise. Accents are also troublesome for me. It is often difficult for me to understand what someone is saying when they have a broad accent however a Scottish accent is one I have never had problems with. I also have a very strong interest in Scottish folk music.


    A drop of a pure double malt doesn't go amiss either:thumbsup:
     
  13. Karoliina

    Karoliina Moderator Emerita

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    I've had several past lives in Scotland, but here is one battle memory. I believe now it happened at the end of the 1200's.


    These have probably nothing to do with my past lives, but I do love the Scottish accent and am passionate about smoky single malts (mostly from Isley). :D


    Karoliina
     
  14. hydrolad

    hydrolad Senior Moderator Super Moderator

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    I too have a love for anything Scottish, all the way from Haggis to Uilleann Pipes, and love Bagpipe music (and always have), and as it goes, I would even stand for the playing of "Scotland the Brave".


    Even though my Father came from a "German" named family, my Mother's side was Scotch-Irish with all of the Scottish attributes (red hair, thrifty, stubborn, reserved and so on), especially my Grandmother who looked after me when I was a child.


    Sadly all of them have passed on now, but if I knew then what I know now, I would have questioned them about their memories, but back then they didn't talk about such things, so now I wonder about perhaps a past life in Scotland.
     
  15. Aaab

    Aaab Registered

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    I love the Uilleaan pipes too. I prefer them indoors as they are no where near as loud as Scottish Bagpipes however the Uilleann pipes are Irish lol:)


    http://www.irelandseye.com/aarticles/culture/music/traditional/ulil.shtm
     
  16. hydrolad

    hydrolad Senior Moderator Super Moderator

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    Good point, I thought about this right after I had posted it.


    I not sure where the confusion about anything from Scotland and also Ireland comes in to the mix, because I love both lands.


    Perhaps I was Irish and then moved to Scotland in a past life, or perhaps because in this lifetime I had ancestors who were Scotch-Irish, who knows?


    Oddly enough, I have loved Bagpipe music early on (even as a very young child) and it's been said "You either love them or you hate them", but my love for the Uilleann pipes came much, much later in life.


    I love to watch Rick Steves on PBS and if the program isn't about Scotland or Ireland, I might find something else to watch!
     
  17. Nightrain

    Nightrain Senior Registered

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    One thing to keep in mind, is that Irish and Scots were cousins for a very long time, and much culture was exchanged, especially between the more northern counties of Ireland and Scotland's mainland and islands.
     
  18. Aaab

    Aaab Registered

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    The Uilleann pipes are very similar in sound only a lot quieter. I'm sure a lot of people who like the Bagpipes,also like the Uilleann pipes.
     
  19. tanguerra

    tanguerra Administrator

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    I just realised neither the son nor the sweetheart in this Scottish love story/tragedy has anything to do with X. This whole Scottish thing is 'something else'. This is something both old and new. (I hope? Do I?)


    Perhaps 'At last I am free?'


    There's defintely a disturbance of some sort going on in my 'psyche'. That's for sure. Who wants to live forever?


    '>Who wants to live forever?
     
  20. tanguerra

    tanguerra Administrator

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    I've been trying to do some work on 'Scotland' the past week or so. Writing recently about one of my earliest or certainly more vivid past life memories, when I was a little child, brought it all back to the 'surface' again.

    I've been dishing out advice about how to do this whole meditation thing, and also having a bit of a go at it myself. Practising a few techniques, and I realise I'm a bit rusty at it. I've got out of the habit recently, distracted by other things...saving the world and so on. But it's nagging at me. So, hey ho! Let's find out what's going on.


    So far all I've got is a flash of me and my brothers as boys going out early one morning to hunt rabbits. It's quite a joyous memory. All I get is a flash of the backs of their skinny knees, scampering ahead of me over hill and dale, clambering over rocks, and me trying to keep up with them, but feeling very wild and free...
     

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