The Christian Haupt Story

Discussion in 'Children's Past Lives -Age 7 & under' started by autumnleavesnnovember, Dec 12, 2016.

  1. autumnleavesnnovember

    autumnleavesnnovember Active Member

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    https://www.amazon.com/Boy-Who-Knew...coding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=SVCA720XG7E89FMXXN3E

    The above book is coming out this spring. His mother wrote it, and hopefully it will be far better written than the James Leininger book. Hay House is publishing it and they are not one of my favorite metaphysical publishers, due to some really unbelievable books they have released. But maybe this one will be good. Has anyone heard anything about this reincarnation story? If so, what do you think?
     
  2. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    Yes! Carol told me about the case almost a year ago. From the videos on line and what Carol said about the case I've been hoping it would be coming out soon. I haven't bought a book in a while. This one will be at the top of my list.

    In the meantime look up the videos. The story is breathtaking.
     
  3. autumnleavesnnovember

    autumnleavesnnovember Active Member

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    The only videos I could find online were of the child throwing baseballs. Are there any discussing the reincarnation aspect? So, Carol thinks it is a legitimate case?

    For anyone who reviews at NetGalley, the ARC is now there for request. (I'm not sure what type of reviewers Hay House favors, however.) Or, if you do want to read it before its release date, Deborah, you might contact Hay House directly and tell them you would like an ARC, because you will be discussing the book here at this forum.
     
  4. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    I found a brief description on line where who he was is stated publicly -
    And yes, Carol vetted the case. It's an exciting one and she believes it to be true.
     
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  5. autumnleavesnnovember

    autumnleavesnnovember Active Member

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    I hope it is true and exciting. I haven't read a good reincarnation story in a long time.
     
  6. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    Me too!ยก!
     
  7. autumnleavesnnovember

    autumnleavesnnovember Active Member

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    Did Carol specifically say she believes the child was Lou Gehrig in a past life or was simply a baseball player? Also, did she say if she believed the child's mother was Lou Gehrig's mother in that past life? His mother, Kathy Byrd, had three past life regressions in the story where she immediately went back to the lifetime of Lou Gehrig's mother; no other past lives, mind you; and remembered all these details about Christina Gehrig's life. Now, she did extensive research on the Gehrig family, but, of course, claims that was after all the past life memories surfaced.
     
  8. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    I'll see if Carol wants to reply directly. I'll alert her to your posts. :D
     
  9. autumnleavesnnovember

    autumnleavesnnovember Active Member

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    Thanks, Deborah. If Carol wants to reply, that's fine. If she does not, that's fine, too. I just felt there were various red flags in the story. Kathy Byrd has obviously sought public attention for her son since he was a toddler; and now she's getting this book published, even though she said in the story she was happy Christian's past life memories were disappearing; and said she did not want him to be ridiculed for believing he was Lou Gehrig. Of course, she was the one who told him who he was at a very young age, after showing him photographs of baseball players. He has already been ridiculed by kids, and one coach announced to a team he was playing on that he was "crazy" for thinking he was Lou Gehrig. What does she think is going to happen if this book gets a lot of public attention? If she wants to claim she was Lou Gehrig's mother, fine. But publicly claiming her young son was a famous person in a past life is not too smart or ethical or believable, in my opinion.
     
  10. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    OK my mistake - she has not vetted the case but has some things to say about it for clarification. Said she'd be here in a few days. She did talk to her in the beginning, and work with her a few years ago but no contact until after -- mom wrote the book. ;)
     
  11. Carol

    Carol Author

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    Cathy Byrd was referred to me by a baseball coach in 2011, when Christian was around 2 1/2, because of his precocious talent at baseball, and because of some remarks he made that had nothing to do with his experience in this life. When she contacted me, she needed some support in trying to figure out what was going on with her son, and wondered if his talents and statements could have anything to do with a past life. We spoke on the phone a couple of times and exchanged emails through 2013. I told Cathy to keep a chronology of Christian's statements, and any other unusual behavior that might relate to the past life Christian was remembering. I was definitely intrigued by the case, because Christian's statements alone indicated that he was remembering another life as a baseball player, and he had the talent to back up his statements. When I lost touch with Cathy, she was trying to piece together who Christian might have been, based on what he said, and was leaning towards Lou Gehrig, because of comments he made about Babe Ruth. She sent me photos of Christian and Lou, and there was a resemblance between the two--both had distinctive dimples on their faces. I thought that was interesting, but not conclusive for an identification.

    I didn't hear from her again until 2016, when she contacted me to ask permission to quote my first book in a book she was writing. By that time, she was pretty sure that Christian was Lou Gehrig, based on Christian's statements, and some past life regression work she did with a therapist in California, in which she saw she was Lou Gehrig's mother.

    I am waiting to read Cathy's book to see how she presents the whole case for Christian being Lou Gehrig. It's possible. It's a strong case for reincarnation. Is Christian the reincarnation of Lou Gehrig? You'll have to decide after reading Cathy's book.
     
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  12. autumnleavesnnovember

    autumnleavesnnovember Active Member

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    Thanks for replying, Carol. Kathy Byrd does mention your book in her book, but she says she contacted you after seeing your name mentioned in an article about James Leininger. She said she first went to your website and ruled out talking about her son in this forum, and instead e-mailed you, at which time you replied within 24 hours. Besides extensively researching the Gehrig family, she has also obviously read many, many books and articles on reincarnation; including the story of a child who was supposedly a legendary golfer in a past life. That of course does not mean her story is untrue, but it's one of many red flags. All the "evidence" that Christian was Lou Gehrig in a past life comes from his mother. All of it.

    Yes, he may have been a great baseball player in a past life due to his "precocious talent" at baseball. As someone who firmly believes prodigies are the result of past lives, I first believed he was a baseball player in one or more past lives, although not necessarily a famous one. Yet something in the book has given me pause about that belief. Namely, Christian has obsessively practiced playing baseball since discovering the game. Obsessively. Hour after hour after hour. Day after day after day. Outside, inside. (There's a YouTube video online posted by his mother where he is hitting balls against the walls inside their home.) His mother clearly described his obsessive practicing and clearly stated they allowed it. Practice makes perfect. Isn't it possible his obsessive practicing is the reason he was such a good player at such a young age, not any past life ball playing? I think so. That made me think of other possible past lives . . . maybe he was a child crippled by asthma or polio who adored baseball, but who could only listen to games on the radio and read about baseball . . . a child who fantasied about being a star baseball player . . . like Lou Gehrig.

    Or maybe he was Lou Gehrig. I'm not totally discrediting that possibility, but there are too many red flags in this book. The biggest one being when Kathy Byrd said Christian told her she was his mother in that past life, and she then has three past life regressions where she immediately becomes Lou Gehrig's mother in all three. Sure. Nevertheless, as you said, Carol, everyone needs to decide for themselves if this past life story sounds true or not. It's not my intention here to tell anyone what to think, or to discourage anyone from reading or buying the book. But, as I stated in earlier posts, Kathy Byrd has sought public attention for her son for years, and is publishing a book on the matter after saying she did not want her son to be ridiculed, and was happy his past life memories were fading. Claiming your child was famous in a past life is really just an extension of claiming you were famous in a past life. And it's those cases that warrant the most critical thinking before deciding if they appear to be genuine or not.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2016
  13. fireflydancing

    fireflydancing just a fly in the sky

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    I like your way of thinking, autumnleavesnnovember: open minded and critical at the same time.
     
  14. IrisG.

    IrisG. Registered

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    Autumnleavesnnovember, you make some good points! I'd like to read your review. Did you already post it somewhere?
     
  15. autumnleavesnnovember

    autumnleavesnnovember Active Member

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    Thank you, fireflydancing and IrisG. No, I haven't written a review yet. The book is not coming out until spring, and I'm debating if I should write and post one now or wait. I do think you have to be both critical and open-minded where the field of metaphysics is concerned. By "critical thinking", though, I don't mean how science defines the term. I'm not scientifically inclined and personally think scientists should stay out of the metaphysical field. Ian Stevenson's work had merit, in my opinion, but I've seen little else worthwhile words or works by scientists discussing reincarnation, NDEs, etc. I mean "critical thinking" in the sense you are well aware there are con artists and delusional individuals out there trying to sell you something worthless, but also honest and insightful individuals who have interesting stories to tell and compelling experiences to share.
     
  16. CarolBowman

    CarolBowman Administrator

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    I read Cathy's book, and I highly recommend it. From what I remember of our early conversations and my notes, I believe she recorded them accurately. We first talked soon after Christian had been to Fenway Park, where first saw the photo of Babe Ruth, and commented that Babe had been mean to him. Had had made other remarks at that point, but this was the first one that could begin to point to his former identity. I had no doubt from what Cathy said, and from Christian's precocious talent and his obsession with baseball, that this was a strong case of a child's past life memory of a former baseball player. This child clearly had a natural talent, which was confirmed early on by baseball professionals.

    I felt that Cathy was being honest with me, that she was not fabricating a story, or creating a story for notoriety. If anything, her world was turned upside-down when Christian started making comments about his life when he was a baseball player. Reincarnation was not part of her belief system, at all, and it alienated her from friends and family. I know that she was genuinely distressed by her son's comments. She was not feeding Christian information. All of the statements that started her search were prompted by her son. Not her.

    I understand how critics will land on her regression experiences as the weakest part of her case. I was skeptical at first, thinking that all of her research of the Gehrig family could have influenced her regression. And, to some extent it could have done so. But some of the specific details that surfaced in her regression about the Gehrig family, which were not readily available in her initial internet and book research, were later confirmed, even to her surprise. I have no reason to believe that she fabricated this part of the story. Even if Cathy's regression experiences were partially influenced by her research, there is enough evidence to point to the life of Lou Gehrig.

    Also, there is a whole spiritual dimension to these memories that shouldn't be discounted. The facts are important, especially when an identification is made. But there is something about these cases, that are better described through the real emotions, and behaviors of the child, in the context of what they are saying. It's not just keeping score with each accurate statement. It's important to look at each case in its entirety. I think this is a very strong case.
     
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  17. autumnleavesnnovember

    autumnleavesnnovember Active Member

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    Carol, it wasn't a matter with me of keeping score about accurate statements. It was the whole story that seemed like it may have been created by a mother looking for more public attention for her son, and needing him to be even more special than he is in reality. Maybe the idea of reincarnation was new and unacceptable to her and maybe it was not. Past lives have gotten lots and lots of public attention, including on shows like Oprah's, since the 1980s. Some believers are in the closet, too, due to the fact they are members of organized religions that denounce such beliefs, or due to the fear of being scorn by those they know. If Cathy Byrd really was concerned about son being ridiculed and was happy his memories were fading, I don't think she would be telling so many people he was Lou Gehrig and publishing this book. And she is the one who told her son who he was in a past life. Those who claim to be famous in a past life, or claim their child was famous in a past life, are usually just trying to claim the glory and fame of those famous individuals. You think this is not a case of that, Carol, and I find your opinions interesting, but I don't agree with you at all.

    Sunday
     
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  18. CarolBowman

    CarolBowman Administrator

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    I'm sure that people will be divided in their opinions after reading the book. That's fine. I hope more people will share their reviews here.

    If I hadn't had a number of conversations with Cathy over the years, I would be more skeptical. But I did follow her process in the beginning, and it was very much like many other parents' experiences I have talked to over the past 28 years. And Christian's case is an unusually strong one for his having been an accomplished baseball player in a previous life. And I believe that Cathy is convinced he was Lou Gehrig, and has evidence to support her claim.

    Autumleaves, what cases, specifically, are you referring to when you say that others have claimed their child was someone famous in a past life? Did they publish their stories? I can't think of any at the moment. Also, please share a review of Cathy's book with us.

    I followed James Leininger's story from the beginning, starting before the Leiningers did the research that pointed to James's former identity as James Huston. I encouraged them to write their amazing story, and introduced them to my literary agent, because I felt it was a story that needed to be shared because it was so detailed, and could be corroborated by those who knew James Huston and the circumstances of his death. Their story opened up many people to the possibility of past lives and reincarnation.

    I feel that Cathy's and Christian's story is also an important story that needs to be told. I feel that Cathy's worldview completely changed when she realized that Christian remembered a past life. The readers will decide if they believe Christian is the reincarnation of Lou Gehrig, and will also have their own opinions as to Cathy's motivation for writing the book. I'm sure the reviews will be mixed.
     
  19. autumnleavesnnovember

    autumnleavesnnovember Active Member

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    Carol, except for the famous golfer story in Jim Tucker's book, I know of no other published stories of children who were famous in past lives. I was referring to the claims made in reincarnation forums and such. I'm afraid that the fact Ms. Byrd's book was published by a major metaphysical book publisher does not make it seem more likely to be a legitimate story, however, particularly since the publisher is Hay House. I have read various Hay House ARCs and some are unbelievable beyond words. That's not how I would describe this book, but there are still too many read flags, in my opinion. My review of it is published at Goodreads right now, and will be later at Amazon, and I can copy it here, if you wish; but I wasn't aware that you wanted book reviews, as opposed to simply comments about the book.

    I firmly believe the James Leininger story is true. They just got the wrong co-author to help them write the book, in my opinion, which was a shame. Part of the book was as intriguing as could be, while part was as nutty as could be. Their co-author was out of his element, or trying to make a word count . . . or something! I actually saw the book as more of a lost chance of convincing more people, particularly men, of the possibility of reincarnation. I also highly respect your opinion, Carol, and all your work with the past lives of children. Nevertheless, I just don't agree with you about this case, and I do seriously question Cathy Byrd's motives. As you said, though, there will be many diverse views on the story, which is good. That will create more discussions, as well as hopefully more critical thinking. Not critical thinking in the scientific way, but in the way that will prevent people from believing simply what they want to believe. But then, that's another topic . . . .
     
  20. CarolBowman

    CarolBowman Administrator

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    Autumnleaves, I agree with you about some of the House Hay publications and the way they do their marketing--getting other Hay House authors to praise in-house publications. Oh, well. You really don't have to post your review here, unless you want to.

    I agree that the co-author of the Leininger book fluffed up the story with some totally irrelevant details that actually diminished the Leiningers' credibility. Yes, word count. I was hoping that Andrea would write her own book, from her perspective, as a mother who was trying to understand what was happening to her son. And Bruce could have offered his process of discovery from not wanting to believe that James had a past life memory, to the timeline of the research that convinced him that his son was a WWII pilot. It's not easy writing a book, and I understand why the Leiningers didn't do it, but it could have been a better told story.

    I'm sure that some people will agree with you about Cathy's motives. If I hadn't talked to her at the beginning, and followed some of her process, I may have shared your opinion.

    I do hope that others on the Forum read her book and comment!
     
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