The Christian Haupt Story

Discussion in 'Children's Past Lives -Age 7 & under' started by autumnleavesnnovember, Dec 12, 2016.

  1. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    Fascinating discussion Ken and Sunday. Great debate. My only addition is that Sunday when you say
    What about our experiences?
     
  2. autumnleavesnnovember

    autumnleavesnnovember Active Member

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    First, you, Deborah, and I'm glad to see you finally joining the thread. :) Well, our experiences shape our beliefs, but my experiences might be very different than your experiences. What if they highly conflict about the afterlife? Whose beliefs and experiences are correct and how do we know who is right or wrong? Or, is the afterlife different for everyone, and thus there's no point "debating" it anyway? That's the direction I was going in, but do tell me what you're thinking.

    Sunday
     
  3. autumnleavesnnovember

    autumnleavesnnovember Active Member

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    I talked with Carol, about this case before the book, before the internet posts. I need to read it yet to really comment, but IMHO it should have been written by a third unbiased party. Presentation is everything![/QUOTE]

    But is wasn't written by an unbiased party. How could it even have been? All someone can do in this case is state if they believe the boy's mother is telling the truth or not. Carol obviously believes her, Jim Tucker wasn't sure what to believe, I don't believe her, others do believe her . . . .

    There's just no "evidence" in this case to be proved.
     
  4. GuySittingintheStands

    GuySittingintheStands New Member

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    Hi, Just thought I'd submit my two cents worth after finishing Cathy Byrd's book, reading the comments on this forum, then re-reading Cathy Byrd's book to make sure we were reading the same book. I thought Cathy Byrd knocked it out of the park. She wrote a very readable, very well written, very enjoyable, interesting, and I thought convincing book. Mom, Apple Pie, Baseball, the Flag, and Past Life Regression! Who knew!

    As to her critics, some of their comments should be well taken (especially wrt Cathy Byrd's PLR experiences), but I thought other criticisms should not be, especially those of PamelaV, the nurse. Christian's breathing ailments could be and probably should be counted as related to Lou Gehrig's progressive ALS, which, in the end, would paralyze his breathing muscles, so much so, that he ultimately died of asphyxiation, as do most ALS victims. Also note that after Christian had come to terms with his previous identity (Lou Gehrig), his breathing problems, which had plagued his toddler years despite some of the best doctoring in southern California, went away.

    But let's say Cathy Byrd made the whole thing up. Let's say she planted the idea in little Christian's head that he was Lou Gehrig in a previous life. Is there any evidence outside of her statements to back up the claim that Christian Haupt was/ is, in fact, Lou Gehrig in a previous life? I submit there is evidence, but probably not the kind some of her critics would accept.

    p.23 the incident in Fenway Park where 2 year old Christian begs his mother (Cathy Byrd) to buy him a large photograph of Red Sox greats Ted Williams and Bobby Doerr from 1939, despite the tons of other baseball trinkets for sale. I'm guessing most 2 year olds would have gone for the bobble-heads.

    p.97 the incident where 4 year old Christian out of the blue tells Tommy Lasorda (Hall of Fame former manager of the Dodgers) that he (Tommy Lasorda) used to play for the Yankees. Tommy replies, "Yes, son, I used to play for the Yankee organization for one year" a fact that is virtually unknown to even die-hard baseball fans. Either this incident happened or it didn't. But maybe Cathy found out beforehand and planted it into her son's head.

    p.98 and ff. the whole relationship between Tommy Lasorda and Christian Haupt starting with Cathy telling Coach Lasorda that Christian "was a big fan of Lou Gehrig. Did you see Lou Gehrig play?" Tommy Lasorda leaned down to Christian and [purportedly] says: "Oh, you picked a good one," he said in a soft voice. "One of the best, he was my hero when I was a kid." He goes on to say that he had actually had dreams as a 15 year old of pitching in Yankee Stadium "with Bill Dickey as my catcher, and Lou Gehrig as my first baseman." It's pretty apparent that Tommy Lasorda idolized the Yankees growing up. Later on Tommy takes a personal interest in Christian's life journey, so much so, that to Christian and the Haupt family, he becomes "Uncle Tommy."

    p.106 the similarity in hitting mechanics, Christian's habit of tipping his hat to the fans after scoring a run but before entering the dugout (just like Lou Gehrig), and then, of course, Christian's breathing ailments, that would go away after he came to terms with his previous identity but, tragically, in the end would kill Lou Gehrig, who would slowly be paralyzed by ALS.

    p.174 the bizarre coincidence of the ALS ice bucket challenge occurring while Christian was just coming out of his "Lou Gehrig" phase (summer 2014). The challenge raised $115 million and the money used to identify one of the genes contributing to ALS, which hopefully will set the stage for a cure some day.

    p.208 and throughout. the close mother son relationship between Cathy Byrd -- who becomes a huge Little League Mom -- and her son Christian, mirroring the mother son relationship between Mom Gehrig -- who would become a huge Little League supporter in Milford, Connecticut after her son's and husband's deaths --
    and Lou. We'll see how this plays out, but I thought it was worth mentioning.

    and finally p.220, the incident where Christian and Cathy divert to Tampa Bay (instead of catching a connecting flight in Charlotte, NC) on their way back to California, where, unbeknownst to them, the Tampa Bay Rays were having some sort of ALS awareness day. Of course, Christian and Cathy won the large framed photo of Lou Gehrig that was being raffled off that day for charity. I say "of course" as if something or someone were trying to get our attention.
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2017
  5. GuySittingintheStands

    GuySittingintheStands New Member

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    Couldn't help but update the discussion re Cathy Byrd's book "The Boy Who Knew Too Much" after doing some research for a separate thread in this forum (see Reincarnation Questions under the thread "Does the location of your death influence your next reincarnation?"). I have been trying to show that location may play a part in where one eventually reincarnates, but not in a way you might expect. For readers of my comments in the location thread the focus is about to shift to Teresa Wright, the actress who plays Lou Gehrig's wife in the 1942 movie "The Pride of the Yankees". More specifically, the focus will shift from Eleanor's trips out to Hollywood to make "The Pride of the Yankees" to Teresa Wright's move to the hills above Encino in the San Fernando Valley, to Teresa Wright's move back to New York City in the 1950s after her first divorce, and her subsequent move to Bridgewater, Connecticut between 1960 and 1965 after marrying her second husband in 1959.

    Anyway I picked up Cathy's book last night for my third time through and am up to p.139 where she starts writing about her experiences with past life regression. As you'll recall, she does this (with great trepidation) because she really wanted to get to the bottom of her son Christian's remarks that she (Cathy) was his mother from his past life as Lou Gehrig, namely that she (Cathy) was the reincarnation of Christina "Mom" Gehrig. From my own research into the Lou Gehrig story I now know a little more than I did back in August when I first posted my comments above re Cathy Byrd's book.

    From "The Boy Who Knew Too Much" (2017):

    p. 102 "The [ball] fields where [4-year-old] Christian played baseball were the same fields where I [Cathy Byrd] had played softball as a kid in the 1970s." This practically confirms my supposition that both Cathy and her son were born in or near the Thousand Oaks, California area. Cathy was born in 1967 in Los Angeles County to a single working mom (p.32) and went to high school at Westlake High, Westlake Village, in the southeastern hills of Thousand Oaks. Westlake Village is a sliver of Thousand Oaks that is in Los Angeles County; the rest of Thousand Oaks is in Ventura County. In 1975 she would have been 8 years old. Cathy Byrd is a real estate agent from the Thousand Oaks, California area and has been selling real estate in the Conejo Valley and western San Fernando area since at least the 1990s with her mother, Judy. Cathy also mentions in the book that she has a half-sister (about the same age as her, attended Westlake High together) and that her father is Richard Byrd (Cathy thanks both her parents Richard and Judy Byrd in the acknowledgments section of her book). Cathy doesn't mention when her father Richard Byrd married her mother Judy, or when they split up.

    p.125-126 During Cathy's first regression with Jeroen, Cathy (as Mom Gehrig) makes an observation about Lou Gehrig's early NY Yankees uniform that is not supported by fact.
    It's clear from the context that Cathy (as Mom Gehrig) is in the stands at Yankee stadium watching her son Lou play early in his career, from context, his first season with the Yankees as a full time player. It has to be 1925. She is excited because "He's playing the game, so we're gonna watch him. He's new though." (p.125). Cathy says that the scenes she recalls under regression were like "vivid 3-D imagery of what was happening around me, a high-definition virtual reality." (p.125)

    p.126 "When Jeroen [the past life regressionist] asked me what the uniform looked like [ie., the uniform of her baseball playing son], I [Cathy being regressed] said my son was wearing a white, pinstripe jersey with the number four . . ."
    Jeroen then asks her (p.127) "How old is your son?"
    [Cathy:] "I blurted, 'Twenty-two" . . .

    Comment: As far as the number on the uniform goes, this is an error on Cathy's part. The Yankees did not start wearing numbers on their jerseys until the 1929 season, Lou's fourth season with the Yankees. Lou Gehrig's first regular season with the Yankees was 1925. On June 2, 1925, Lou replaced Wally Pipp at first base, and play regularly in every game from then on for the next 14 years. He would turn 22 years old 17 days later on June 19, 1925.

    To be fair, Cathy (as Cathy) is consciously present during the whole regression as an outside observer. It's not like Cathy checks out, and Mom Gehrig takes over. So it's possible that when Jeroen prompts Cathy with a question that Mom Gehrig can't answer in a given scene from her life (Jeroen: "What's the number [on Lou's jersey in 1925]?" , Cathy jumps in with an answer based on her own research, which Mom Gehrig, at that moment in her life, couldn't have known.

    p. 130 and the whole I Will Find You chapter. Cathy, during her first regression session with Jeroen, and under Jeroen's direction, has a conversation with her dead son, Lou Gehrig, purportedly in heaven.
    [Jeroen:] "Is Lou there?"
    [Cathy:] "I [now as Christina Gehrig, Lou's mother] nodded and my voice quivered as I described Lou coming toward me to give me a hug."
    [Jeroen:] "Ask, Lou, ask him why he needed to leave this lifetime so early."
    [Cathy:] "I replied, 'Why did you have to leave so early? Why did you leave me? He said, 'I chose this.' "
    [Jeroen:] "Why did he choose it?" [to leave life early].
    [Cathy:] "Lou said, 'Better to have lived.' " [comment: not enough context to interpret what is meant here, but possibly . . . ''than not to have lived." ]
    [Jeroen:] "What else do you want to ask him?"
    [Cathy:] "I said, 'Will I see you again?"
    [Jeroen:] "What does he say?"
    [Cathy:] " ' I will find you,' I said as tears started to roll down my cheeks."
    [Jeroen:] "So what do you feel now?"
    [Cathy:] "Smiling through my tears, I replied, 'I feel like he did find me. In Christian, he did.' "
    [Jeroen:] "He is Christian?"
    [Cathy:] "Yeah."
    [Jeroen:] "So he kept his word?"
    [Cathy:] "Yeah," I replied now laughing through my tears . . ."

    Comment: Because I myself am trying to decide how much cred to give to reincarnation case studies in general, and the Christian Haupt story in particular (Cathy's first-hand account is not a case study) I really am trying to stay away from the woo-woo aspects of all this,
    But. Really? When Cathy as Mom Gehrig "sees" "Lou", "in Heaven", is she really seeing him or a vision of him, or what.

    In a way, as I'm starting to discover from my research into the Location question, when Cathy (as Mom Gehrig) has "Lou" say "I will find you" (ie., that he, Lou, will find Christina, his mother) she may be right, but not in the way she thinks. It may turn out that they (Lou and his mother) find each other. One scenario (the one I am working on) goes: Lou, post-mortem, goes out to Hollywood in 1941 with Eleanor, his wife, then to the western San Fernando Valley in June 1942 with Teresa Wright, who played his wife in the movie "The Pride of the Yankees" (1942). Mom Gehrig (d. 1954, Milford, Connecticut), post-mortem, goes out to Thousand Oaks, 1963 (as we shall see!). Lou finds his mom (that is, Mom Gehrig) in 1967, in Cathy's birth, in the Thousand Oaks area. I know, weird. But so much of this stuff sounds weird.

    p.133-134. Back home in Thousand Oaks, California, Cathy Byrd, during one of those strange past life conversations with her now 5-year-old son, has Christian say:
    " 'She [Eleanor Gehrig, his wife in his previous life as Lou Gehrig] drank alcohol, and there was a lot of yelling, like ["dumb"] Babe Ruth.' "

    Comment: No question that Eleanor drank, and smoked, and had a fiery personality, so unlike the Teresa Wright character in the movie "The Pride of the Yankees".
    But Lou also drank (in moderation, and then only sparingly). Lou loved beer. Lou smoked (they both were constantly sneaking cigarettes). And Lou could get angry on rare occasions whenever he felt he had been unjustly wronged (hinted at early in the movie when Lou as a young fraternity student at Columbia University tears into the head frat boy after he mocks Lou over his initial attempts at talking with a girl). He didn't mind criticism but could not stand unfair criticism. And he could be moody at times. But I think Lou had too much discipline to get drunk (apparently he couldn't handle his alcohol so he would almost always stop after a one or two drinks), whereas Eleanor could not or would not. This is what I think young Christian means here. Or that Eleanor drank hard liquor and he did not. Much later on in life, in her years of loneliness after the death of her husband (she and Lou didn't have any children and Eleanor never remarried), her lawyer worried that Eleanor might drink herself to death. She had no real friends late in life. At least none that would show up for her funeral in 1984. (to be continued in the following post).
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2017
  6. GuySittingintheStands

    GuySittingintheStands New Member

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    (continued from the previous post)

    p.134 Cathy has 5-year-old Christian say during the same strange past life conversation:
    [Christian:] "Lou should have never married that dumb lady [Eleanor]. She was drunk."

    Comment: Whoa, Cathy. Do you really want to have Christian say this? Despite the arguing over the Gehrigs' relationship with Mom Gehrig, the drinking, the occasional yelling, these two [Lou and Eleanor] were crazy in love with each other. And demonstrably so. He often wrote to her when the Yankees were on the road. At the end of at least one letter that he wrote to her, the one he writes from the Book-Cadillac hotel in Detroit, the day after taking himself out of the game with the Tigers and breaking his 2130 game streak because he knew something was seriously wrong with him and that he consequently was hurting the team with his play, he finishes with "I adore you, Sweetheart." (Richard Sandomir, "The Pride of the Yankees" 2017). I'd quote the whole letter, but I don't have a box of tissues nearby.

    For their 4th wedding anniversary in Sept 1937, Lou gives Eleanor a diamond and gold bracelet. But its not just any diamond and gold bracelet. Lou had a bracelet made of 17 of his team championships', batting championships', MVP, and All-Star medallions, rings, pins, etc that he had collected over his career with the Yankees. They added to the bracelet over their remaining years together including one souvenir from Lou's foray into Hollywood movies (Jan 1938, as a fictionalized version of himself in an obscure cowboy western movie called "Rawhide" (1938), shot ironically enough, in Thousand Oaks, California.). In a sense he was saying with this gift to her: I love baseball more than life, but I love you even more. In the movie The Pride of the Yankees, the bracelet you see just before the 2 hour mark is the actual bracelet, given by Eleanor to Teresa Wright to wear during filming of The Pride of the Yankees (Passe Richard Sandomir, who writes that it was a bracelet "like" the one Eleanor so prized -- not true according to a June 19, 2003 New York Post interview of Teresa Wright, it was the real thing.) This bracelet plays an instrumental part in the last 10 minutes of the movie as a symbol of Lou and Eleanor's love for one another.

    Two days before his death the evening of Monday, June 2, 1941, lying on his deathbed surrounded by Eleanor, her mother Nellie, and the attendant doctor, before he slipped into a coma that morning (of June 2nd), Lou whispers, "My three pals" (his last words). (Richard Sandomir quotes it, but I don't know where reference originally comes from, to be completely transparent).
    And of course, there is the "Luckiest man" address (which was probably written by either Lou or both of them together the night before) where he thanks Eleanor for being the bravest woman he ever knew, and for her strength and courage.

    So, sure, the Hollywood movie with Gary Cooper and Teresa Wright goes out of its way to soften and sweeten the relationship, but there is no doubt that the two really did love one another during their brief life together. I could give other examples (especially the Tristan und Isolde reference in Sandomir's book), but I'll stop here.
    So Cathy. Really? But maybe in death Lou chooses between his two "best girls", taking the side of his mother, who died in 1954. Maybe in death, Lou gains some knowledge of how poorly and unfairly Eleanor treated his parents after he died, and turned away from her. Eleanor died alone in 1984 in NYC. (as an interesting side-note, Teresa Wright died March 6, 2005 in New Haven, Connecticut; Eleanor Twitchell Gehrig was born March 6, 1904 and died March 6, 1984.)

    p.135. Mom Gehrig being surprised by Lou's death. This is one of the bigger mysteries of the whole Lou Gehrig story: who knew what when. I don't know. Cathy, under regression, has Mom Gehrig saying that she was surprised by her son's death. There is some truth to this. Even after the diagnosis, both Lou and his mother may have been under the impression, that, although he had a serious illness, it wasn't necessarily fatal. Both were fighters and placed a lot of misguided faith or hope in authority, Lou's doctors and, of course, Lou's will to achieve, his work ethic. When Lou tells Eleanor (who knows what Lou's prognosis is through her own sources, that is, that Lou's illness is terminal with no hope of survival), that he has a 50/50 chance, he may or may not have really believed it. Even as the months and his illness (ALS) progressed and he was obviously following the 2 - 3year death course of almost every other terminally ill ALS patient known to medicine, he would tell his former teammates that he was going to "lick this thing". So, did Mom Gehrig know or not? Cathy gets it right when she references the collosal fight Eleanor and Mom Gehrig had 3 months before Lou dies. Words, and I mean vicious words on both sides, were said that probably should not have been said, each blaming the other for Lou's obviously dire condition upstairs asleep in his bedroom. Richard Sandomir has Lou banishing his parents from Eleanor and Lou's home because the yelling was so bad, so vicious. You can imagine at this point with both Eleanor and Christina having fought over Lou for 8 years how high the emotional stakes were.

    (reading on) p.155 Chapter entitled Whispers of the Soul. Cathy plunges deep into the rabbit hole trying to resolve the discrepancy between something she said during her first regression session (that Mom Gehrig thought Lou would get better or at least survive his illness) and the widely held belief that Lou knew what his prognosis was (certain death) before he gave his famous "Luckiest Man" address in Yankee Stadium.

    Comment: After doing some reading, however incomplete, I tend to agree with Cathy: Lou may not have known the final prognosis because the doctors in those days didn't always tell you when they knew you were a goner. Eleanor would have known through secondary sources, but not Mom Gehrig possibly until the very end. Cathy finds the answer to the mystery on p.168 when she discovers a note in the Baseball Hall of Fame archives written by Eleanor's mother, Nellie, in which Nellie says that Eleanor ordered the examining doctors not to tell Lou that his illness was terminal. No doubt true. Other references (Richard Sandomir) say that at least one reporter found out the ALS terminal diagnosis but chose not to let the word out. ALS was and is a rare disease so it's likely very few people knew what the end result of such a diagnosis was, and probably confused it with the widely reported diagnosis of "infantile paralysis" which further muddied the waters. One can argue about why Goldwyn's creative team framed the moment when Lou gets the diagnosis from the head examining physician at the Mayo (not Scripps btw) Clinic in Minnesota ("Give it to me straight . . . Is it 3 strikes, Doc?" "Do you want it straight?" Lou "Sure I do" Doc "3 strikes"), leading the movie viewer to believe that he had been given the truth. In the end though, Goldwyn's team most likely did it this way to heighten the drama of Lou's farewell address and justify Teresa Wright's practically inconsolable weeping during the last few minutes of the movie.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2017
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  7. GuySittingintheStands

    GuySittingintheStands New Member

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    Just doing some background research into Cathy Byrd's The Boy Who Knew Too Much, 2017 Hay House. You know. Trust but verify.

    There may be a flaw in Cathy Byrd's story of being regressed back to Christina Gehrig, the mother of Lou Gehrig. It could be explained away very easily, but it still raises a doubt. One of the criticisms of The Boy Who Knew Too Much is Cathy's incredible accounts of 3 past life regressions she had with a Los Angeles based regressionist named Jeroen. In all 3 regressions Cathy chooses to regress back to Christina "Mom" Gehrig, and not to anyone else. According to at least one earlier post (autumnleaves) this is not typical. Are these real, untainted, past life regression accounts or could Cathy's regression narratives have been influenced by research she had done, consciously or unconsciously? Could details of the regression have even been contrived?

    The potential flaw, and I emphasize that it may only be a potential flaw, not a real flaw, since it can easily be explained away, arises from Cathy's 3rd and final regression with Jeroen. Cathy, under regression, describes being old and gray and living with a family during the last few years of her life (pp. 176-178).

    Cathy, as Mom Gehrig, tells Jeroen, that she has a "small dog" that she describes as a "a boy dog" (p.176). She also says she has a bird in a big iron cage. (p.180). Cathy, after doing some research in the Baseball Hall of Fame library, discovers a note from the Hall to a Mr. George Steigler, concerning some photographs. She discovers an obituary for his wife Laurel Steigler through some online research and discovered that Mom Gehrig did live with the Steigler family in Milford, Connecticut during the last few years of her life. Cathy tracks down the Steiglers' children who were about ages 10 and 7 when Mom Gehrig lived with their family in Milford (small coastal town adjacent to and just southwest of New Haven, Connecticut) from about 1951 to 1954, Mom Gehrig's death. Cathy eventually gets in contact with the older of the two children, a 71 year old United Methodist pastor named Rev. Ken Steigler, born in 1941, who confirms many of the details of Cathy's 3rd regression session with Jeroen, including Mom Gehrig's possession of a dachshund named Monkey, and an old parrot in an iron cage who, apparently, was very good at mimicking people including Mom Gehrig.

    When Mom Gehrig passed away in March 1954 at Milford Hospital, she left the Baseball Hall of Fame Lou's Trophies and awards that she still possessed, but the bulk of her estate went to two women she had known for years. (Her son Lou Gehrig had died June 2, 1941 and her husband Henry Gehrig 5 years later on Aug 16, 1946). One of the women was Laurel Steigler, George Steigler's wife of Milford, Connecticut, and the other woman, an old friend of Mom Gehrig, is discussed in the following online New York Times article: "A Lou Gehrig Treasure Trove" by Peter Applebome, Aug 1, 2011. The article concerns the recollections of a Jeffrey Quick, born 1942, whose mother, Ruth (Martin) Quick, was a girlfriend of Lou Gehrig in 1930, when Lou was still living with Mom and Pop Gehrig in New Rochelle, New York, a town just northeast of the Bronx in Westchester County near the Connecticut border. Lou's relationship with Ruth Martin didn't work out for whatever reason, and he later met a Chicago girl (Eleanor Twitchell) in 1932, and married her the following year in late Sept 1933. However, Mom Gehrig maintained a close friendship with Ruth, who eventually married a 5th Avenue upscale furniture salesman named Herbert Quick in 1934. Ruth's son, 69 year old Jeffrey Quick, had many fond memories of Mom Gehrig, even visiting her at her home in Mt. Vernon, Westchester County, New York, as a child (Mom and Pop Gehrig were forced to move from their New Rochelle home in Sept 1937 after they were foreclosed on for missing a semi-annual mortgage payment, and Lou couldn't or wouldn't come up with the $9000 cash -- roughly $180,000 cash in today's money, to cover). Mom and Pop Gehrig (d. 1946) lived in Mt. Vernon, New York from 1937-1948, when the widow Mom Gehrig moved to her own place in Milford,Connecticut in 1948. Anyway, Jeffrey remembered Mom Gehrig's dachshund Monkey, and a parrot, whom he thinks was named Bill, from the Quick family visits with the widowed Mom Gehrig during the 1940s. This is of course the same dachshund Monkey and parrot that Rev. Ken Steigler remembers from his childhood when Mom Gehrig was living with the Steigler family in Milford, Connecticut, 1951-1954, although Rev. Ken remembered the bird's name as Polly.

    So far, so good. No worries.

    The potential problem arises from a 2002 online Lou Gehrig fanblog called, moregehrig.tripod . com, in the Questions and Answers section.
    A reader asked "Did Lou and Babe really hate each other? What really was the cause of the "feud" between them? "
    As part of his answer, responding to the reader's question, the blogger makes a curious statement, curious that is, at least for us:

    Blogger: "[Babe] Ruth did indulge in Gehrig's mother's cooking and gave her a little dog as a present, while Ruth's youngest daughter, Dorothy spent many hours at the Gehrigs' house (and she [as a young girl] developed a crush on Gehrig) . . . .

    It's not too hard to figure an upper limit to when Babe Ruth gave Mom Gehrig the little dog. Apparently the Babe and Lou Gehrig had a major falling out over something Mom Gehrig said in 1932 about how Babe's second wife Claire was dressing Babe's daughter from a previous relationship, Dorothy. Babe in so many words told Lou to tell his mother to mind her own business, which Lou took as a slight against his mother, Mom Gehrig. (Dorothy Ruth was about 10 or 11 in 1932, you can read the account in Babe Ruth's wikipedia write-up). Still, Ruth intended to make amends with Lou in 1934 sometime before or during a major league baseball goodwill trip to Japan with a squad of ballplayers including Ruth, Gehrig, and their wives. A widely discussed incident happened on board the cruise to Japan between Lou and Babe Ruth, and the two greats subsequently stopped talking to each other. If Babe Ruth gave Mom Gehrig the small dog, (a dachshund?) in 1932 before the feud, the dog would have been 19 years old in 1951, the year Mom Gehrig moved into the Steigler's home in Milford, Connecticut, assuming it is the same little dog. If Babe Ruth gave Mom Gehrig the small dog in 1934, the dog would have been 17 years old in 1951, very, very old for a dog. Of course, Mom and Pop Gehrig, or Mom Gehrig alone after her husband's death in Aug 1946, could have bought a new puppy, say a dachshund, to keep her company at her home in Mt. Vernon, New York, and that's probably the simple solution to this little mystery. But I thought I'd bring it up anyway. Due diligence and all that, you know.

    By the way, has anyone knowledgeable in past life regression, either from this forum, or anyone else for that matter, vetted Cathy Byrd's regression tapes for authenticity?

    Just askin'.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2017
  8. GuySittingintheStands

    GuySittingintheStands New Member

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    OK. I've just skimmed through the transcripts of Cathy Byrd's three past life regressions (Apr, June, November 2014) which are available on her website (cathy-byrd . com , under Regressions).

    There was some new information that was not in the book. In the first regression she mentions a little boy, the son of a friend, she nicknames "Joey". The context of this reference leads me to believe that she is talking about Jeffrey Quick, b. 1942, the son of a female friend of hers (Ruth Martin Quick, a former girlfriend of Lou Gehrig). "Joey" is close enough to "Jeffrey" and so I'm scoring this as a hit. People that don't go over these stories a lot probably wouldn't, but I do. Two syllables, with the first and last parts of the two names identical. Close enough doesn't have to look like this; they can be rhyming variants of each other, or even simple word plays of each other.

    Cathy, under regression, mentions a small dog in the first regression, nicknamed "Jidge" (first regression, p.22). From the first and third regressions we learn that it is a small, white dog with soft fur. It lived with her when Cathy (as Mom Gehrig) lived with the Steigler family in Milford, Connecticut (1951-1954, Mom Gehrig's death). The dog (and the bird in the iron cage) survived Mom Gehrig's death March 12, 1954, in Milford (third regression). Cathy, as Mom Gehrig, post-mortem, assumes that the family will take care of her animals (third regression).

    Ummmm. This might be a miss. This may not be the dachshund that both Jeffrey Quick and Rev. Ken Steigler (who was about 10 years old when Mom Gehrig lived with the Steigler family in Milford) named "Monkey". There are cream-colored long-haired dachshunds but they seem to be a specialty variant of the more common red or motley black and white long-haired dachshund. Specialty breeds tend to be rarer and pricier. It could also be a dachshund-mix which would account for the white color (or a very old dog, which would also account for the white color). I don't think we're talking about two separate dogs from two different times in Mom Gehrig's life since Cathy, under regression as Mom Gehrig, puts this small dog with the soft, white fur on the couch with her at the Steiglers ie., 1951-1954.

    There is still the issue of the small dog that Babe Ruth gave Mom Gehrig sometime circa 1932 - 1934. I'm trying to run down the reference to this dog at present. Let's see what I come up with. Google does say that dachshunds have an average life span of 14-16 years, but some live even longer, with 17 or even longer not unheard of.

    My feeling at this point is that Cathy has oversold the detail of the small dog. By not including the details that she mentions in the regression (white, soft fur, nicknamed "Jidge") in her book, the reader is led to believe it is the same small dog that Rev. Ken Steigler remembers (dachshund named Monkey). Now that I think about it, anyone who had read the Aug 1, 2011 NY Times online article ("A Lou Gehrig Treasure Trove") could have come up with the story about "Joey" (Jeffrey Quick) consciously or unconsciously.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2017
  9. GuySittingintheStands

    GuySittingintheStands New Member

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    I've continued my reading and am starting to get up to speed on the Lou Gehrig story, sorry for the delay. I, like many visitors to this forum, have been trying to come to some understanding of reincarnation, can it be put on a firmer footing and if so, be taken a little more seriously than it currently is. You have to admit it is a very strange field to be working in and the few people who are taking the subject seriously enough to put their reputations on the line need to be reassured that there could be some truth to the whole thing, however strange. But what is lacking are enough verified and verifiable stories or case studies to think about or bring up in polite company. So far there is enough anecdotal evidence to suggest that reincarnation might actually be a real phenomenon (eg., the James Leininger story), but there are also stories out there that, well, don't hold up as well. By this I don't mean to imply that the Christian Haupt story doesn't hold up, it's just that I would like to know how much of it can be believed and how much of it can be dismissed. Or do we believe or dismiss the whole story in its entirely? At this point I'm reserving judgement and will just keep researching Cathy Byrd's story until I get tired of it or the forum gets tired of reading my posts. So with everyone's permission, I would like to continue (even though my posts are starting to look like a blog, I really don't mean them to. It would be fun to get other people's input, please don't let me put you off!)

    On the third page of the photo section of Cathy Byrd's book, The Boy Who Knew Too Much (Hay House, 2017), there is a black and white photograph from the National Baseball Hall of Fame Library of Christina "Mom" Gehrig holding a small black dog. Henry "Pop" Gehrig is standing to her immediate left. The photo, which can be found on the internet by doing a simple google search, looks to have been taken sometime in the late 1930s judging by the cars in the background and the apparent (and known) ages at the time of Mom and Pop Gehrig. Cathy's caption for the photo names the two people in the photo (Christina and Henry Gehrig) but she doesn't provide the name of the small black dog Christina "Mom" Gehrig is holding in her right hand. The same photo can be found on the second page of the photo section of Jonathan Eig's excellent 2005 biography of Lou Gehrig, Luckiest Man, The Life and Death of Lou Gehrig. In the accompanying caption to the photo Eig provides the name of the dog, "Jidge" ("Christina and Heinrich (Henry) Gehrig with Jidge: The dog was a gift from Babe Ruth.") From the text Eig implies that Babe Ruth gave the dog to Mom Gehrig in the 1926-1928 time frame, the Babe being a frequent guest at the Gehrigs after Lou invited the great one over to the Gehrig house in New Rochelle one afternoon for some of Mom Gehrig's excellent German cooking. He must have liked Mom Gehrig's cooking because he became a frequent guest, even dropping his daughter Dorothy off many times to play at the Gehrig's in the 1929 - 1932 timeframe (Dorothy was born Sept 1922).

    In her memoirs Dorothy wrote about her father, Babe Ruth, and his relationship to the Gehrigs during this general time period:

    "My father never forgot the kind treatment he received at the hands of the close-knit Gehrig family. After the Yankees swept the 1928 World Series [October 1928], someone gave my father a Mexican hairless dog as a present. The next time he saw Mom Gehrig, he was ready. He pulled the dog out of his coat pocket and presented it to her. In turn, she named the chihuahua [sic!] pup "Jidge", a nickname given to Babe by his [Yankee] teammates." (Dorothy Ruth Pirone with Chris Martens, My Dad, the Babe; Growing Up with an American Hero (1988) p. 107). ("Jidge" is an affectionate if not slightly distorted pronunciation of Babe Ruth's name, George, or more fully, George Herman Ruth.)

    Mexican Hairless is the common name for the hard to pronounce Aztec name of this breed, suffice it to say, that they come in two varieties, coated and hairless, and that they are sometimes mistaken for chihuahuas. A simple internet search would suggest to anyone that the dog in the photo in Cathy Byrd's book is a black, coated Mexican Hairless, probably past middle age judging from the white whiskers Jidge was beginning to sprout on his lower muzzle.

    Mom Gehrig's dog probably passed away sometime in the early 1940s given the average life span of this breed. (In 1943 Jidge would have been 15 years old).

    In the transcripts of her past life regressions which are provided by Cathy Byrd on her website at cathy-byrd . com, under Regressions, Cathy mentions "Jidge" a couple of times (during the course of the first (Apr 2014) and third (November 2014) regressions:

    CBRT-1, p.22 (Cathy Byrd Regression Transcripts, First Session, p.22):

    Jeroen: Is there anything or anybody around you? Cathy: A dog (laughing). Jeroen: Is it a dog that you know? Cathy: A little dog, yeah. Jidge. Jeroen: Was the dog with you when you were alive? Cathy: Yeah. Jeroen: Have Jidge take you where you need to go.

    The context is Cathy (as Mom Gehrig) describing a purported memory of her deceased son, Lou Gehrig (d. 1941), deceased husband Pop Gehrig (d. 1946), and Jidge somewhere in the ethereal realm or some imagined re-meeting of the family in her possibly deceased mind.

    CBRT-3. p.1 (Cathy Byrd Regression Transcripts, Third Session, p.1):

    Jeroen: What do you see? Cathy: I saw a dog but that's it -- like a little white dog. Jeroen: What is it doing? Cathy: I can't really see it that well anymore. Jeroen: Is the dog sitting down or moving? Cathy: It is kind of alert & happy. Jeroen: What does it feel like? Cathy: It has soft fur. It kind of sits on the couch. It likes to sit by me - beside me under my arm.

    The context is Cathy (as Mom Gehrig) sitting on the couch of a family she is living with in Milford, Connecticut. Mom Gehrig is old and gray and living out the last remaining years of her life with some old friends (the Steiglers) and their children in Milford, Connecticut. 1951-1954 (Mom Gehrig's death). According to Cathy (as Mom Gehrig) her dog, which she describes as a small dog with soft white fur named Jidge, is sitting next to her on the couch at this family's house.

    and finally CBRT-3, p.15-16:

    Jeroen: And what about your little dog, was he still alive when you passed? Cathy: Yeah, I think the family is going to keep him for me, I think, and the bird.

    From context one has to assume that Cathy (as Mom Gehrig) is talking about her dog Jidge who is still alive when Mom Gehrig passes (1954) in Milford, Connecticut.
    Except that Jidge was a black, coated Mexican Hairless, who probably didn't make it long past 1943 (when he would have turned 15). We know that Mom and Pop Gehrig (or possibly Mom Gehrig on her own after her husband died in 1946) got a dachshund sometime in the early or mid-1940s, while they (she) were (was) living in Mt. Vernon, New York (1938-1948). We know this from two eyewitness accounts, Jeffrey Quick (b. 1942) and Rev. Ken Steigler (b. 1941). Mom Gehrig's dachshund, who was named Monkey, after the nickname opposing ballplayers gave Babe Ruth during his heyday with the Yankees, would easily have still been alive in 1954 when Mom Gehrig passed away. Misplaced memory or something else?

    I have read through Cathy's regression transcripts in detail and there are several other errors like this or worse. I don't want to nit-pick, but some of them are egregious, and I'll get to them in later posts if I may (with everyone's permission of course!)

    In the meantime, there may be a fascinating synchronicity between Teresa Wright, the actress who plays Mrs. Lou (Eleanor) Gehrig in the 1942 movie, The Pride of the Yankees, and Cathy Byrd's story, and, of course, the Thousand Oaks, California area (assuming Cathy Byrd's story is on the up and up). As a preview, and if you have time and/or interest, first watch, Rawhide (1938), a corny but endearing B-movie cowboy western starring Lou Gehrig as himself, which was filmed in Jan 1938 in the western San Fernando Valley or most likely adjoining Conejo Valley (Thousand Oaks area). Then watch a Bonanza TV episode guest starring Teresa Wright and filmed sometime in 1963 at least partially in the same Thousand Oaks area, at least the first few minutes, anyway, for the outdoor shots.

    Both are available on youtube. The Bonanza TV episode (Bonanza, Season 5 (1963-1964), Episode 16, originally aired Jan 19, 1964), was entitled "My Son, My Son" and tells the fictional story of "Ben [Cartwright]'s plans to wed the widow Catherine Saunders (Teresa Wright) is jeopardized by the widow's son being accused of murder." For old timers this will be nostalgic, but for everyone else, Bonanza was a very popular American TV series from the late 1950s and 1960s, about the adventures of a tough but aging widowed rancher (Ben Cartwright) and his three charming adult boys set on a fictional 1000 square mile spread ("The Ponderosa") in western Nevada bordering Lake Tahoe in the late 19th Century Old West. About 4 minutes into the episode they show a beautiful wide angle shot of Lake Tahoe (looking north to south) as it appeared in 1963. Sound familiar? It's the same Lake Tahoe that became a favorite family reunion destination for the Byrd family during Cathy's (born 1967) growing up years, and again, during her married adult years with her own family (husband Michael, kids Christian and Charlotte), her mother, half-sister(s), cousins, aunts and uncles (pp.77-78 in The Boy Who Knew Too Much).
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2017
  10. KenJ

    KenJ Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Guy, I would not put too much into the "pieces" that don't fit, current-life memories often put things out of order or embellishes the actual happenings, so I would imagine that the same thing would occur when recalling things even further back. I think we fall into a trap in believing that "spirits" know/speak/understand the "truth" - they may be more advanced and can see and do more, yes, but still not perfect. I think that you are doing an admirable job in the research that you are doing and enjoy what you have written. I watched a bit of Rawhide but have not yet watched the Bonanza episode you mentioned.

    For what it's worth, Lou's Rawhide movie came out just over a month before I was born. I passed through the Lake Tahoe area in 1952 and again in 1977, and am indeed old enough to remember the Cartwrights, but I never saw Lou or Babe play baseball, that was before my time.
     
    Mere Dreamer likes this.
  11. GuySittingintheStands

    GuySittingintheStands New Member

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    Thanks, Ken. I'll take that as permission to proceed. Yes, I'm having fun researching this and glad you find it amusing.

    Just a quick note this time. I just chanced on an online article written by Cathy Byrd for her local Ventura County newspaper, Citizens Journal Real News For Ventura County, dateline March 23, 2014.

    http://citizensjournal.us/our-local...-league-and-loving-americas-favorite-pastime/

    Apparently by late March 2014 Cathy had gone public with Christian's story, online. The article reads like a synopsis draft of her 2017 book, chronicalling Christian's PL accounts up to the article's dateline (March 23, 2014). Cathy's draft synopsis of Christian's statements in her local online newspaper appeared just before Dr. Jim Tucker's April 2, 2014 visit to the Byrd/Haupt condo in Thousand Oaks, California, and just before Cathy's first past life regression with Jeroen (April, 2014). I'd have to think about what this means as far as Cathy's intent and credibility goes either pro or con, but it does show that by March 2014 she had put a lot of thought into this project, possibly with the intent of writing a book. Cathy mentions in her book (p.110) that she bought and devoured Dr. Tucker's book, Return to Life, when it first came out on Dec 3, 2013. Apparently she began an e-mail correspondence with Dr. Tucker about Christian's statements of a past life as a "tall baseball player" shortly after reading Dr. Tucker's book, which led to Dr. Tucker's April 2, 2014 visit.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2017
  12. MaxUsernameLimit

    MaxUsernameLimit New Member

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    Does anyone know Christian's birth date? I am interested in exploring reincarnation from astrological point of view and would be interesting to see if there are some "coincidences" between Gehrig and Christian's horoscopes (unfortunately there's no birth time for Gehrig, so it won't be a very acurrate conclusion, but still).
     
  13. KenJ

    KenJ Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    A Google search returned 5/30/1980.
     
  14. GuySittingintheStands

    GuySittingintheStands New Member

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    You're slipping Ken.

    Max. Reread Cathy Byrd's book. You'll get to within 3 or 4 days of it, I'm sure. Close to Harry Potter's birthday, if you've read J.K. Rowling's "children's" books.
    Fancy that. Christian Haupt, The Boy Who Lived . . . Before?
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2017
  15. KenJ

    KenJ Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Guy, you caught me. I not only slipped, I fell on my face - only off by about thirty years. I was not thinking, just Googled it and entered the date that I found. Just tried again and no date showed up, weird!
    Much like the post the other day where they claimed to have been born in the 1880's and were 7 years old in 19o7 and tired of reading about the Dead Sea scrolls that actually were not discovered until 1947.
     
  16. MaxUsernameLimit

    MaxUsernameLimit New Member

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    Hi GuySittingintheStands,

    thanks for the suggestion! Unfortunately 3-4 days is not good enough in terms of accuracy for any kind of serious astrological work.
     
  17. GuySittingintheStands

    GuySittingintheStands New Member

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    Max. Looks like Christian Haupt was born on August 14, 2008. Besides sharing a birthday with Magic Johnson, the crucial clues were in Cathy Byrd's book: on p.86, where we find out that Christian's 4th birthday party was celebrated a few days before the first day of school in 2012 which was either Tuesday Sept 4th, or Wednesday Sept 5th (Labor Day, 2012, was Monday, Sept 3, 2012), and p.32, where we find out that Christian's 3rd birthday was celebrated on a Sunday, late July or August 2011. The Sundays of August, 2011, were August 7, 14, 21, and 28.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2017
  18. GuySittingintheStands

    GuySittingintheStands New Member

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    To quote 7 year old Charlotte Haupt just after hearing her little brother, Christian, tell their mother, Cathy Byrd, that she, Cathy, was his mother when he was Lou Gehrig in a previous lifetime: "Now it's getting weird."

    Max's question had me re-reading The Boy Who Knew Too Much again for more times than I'm willing to admit. I wanted to finish up the dog issue anyway, but I came across something even more startling, with regard to Lou and Christina Gehrig's closest friends, the Liebs, and Cathy Byrd's closest confidants from the woo-woo zone, Tracy and Jeff from pp.119-120 of Cathy's book.

    First the dog issue. We left it with Cathy being regressed back to Mom Gehrig recalling a small dog with soft white fur sitting on the couch with her at a home in Connecticut towards the end of her life (Mom Gehrig lived with her friends the Steigler's 1951-1954, Mom Gehrig's death, in Milford, Connecticut.) Cathy (as Mom Gehrig) mistakenly recalled the name of the dog as "Jidge", which, it turns out, was the name of a small black coated Mexican Hairless dog Mom Gehrig owned from 1928 to probably the early 1940s. From about the early 1940s to her death in 1954, she owned a dachshund named "Monkey" according to two first-hand eyewitness accounts (Jeffrey Quick, b. 1942, and Rev. Ken Steigler, b. 1941). ("Jidge" and "Monkey" by the way, were two nicknames for Babe Ruth from the 1920s -- the first affectionate, the second, well, not as affectionate.)
    Anyway, the Gehrigs were dog lovers. (The Gehrig family dog in the 1920s and early 1930s was a black, pure-bred German Shephard named Afra of Cosalta, which Lou used to show in local kennel club competitions). After Lou's marriage to Eleanor Twitchell in late Sept 1933, the newly-wed couple moved into an apartment building overlooking Long Island Sound in New Rochelle, NY, a few blocks from his parents' home on Meadow Lane. Dogs weren't allowed. Neither were dogs allowed later on when the couple moved further up the coast into an apartment building in Larchmont, New York, also on Long Island Sound.

    After Lou's retirement from baseball at the end of the 1939 baseball season, Lou accepted a job as a NYC parole officer in lower Manhattan. To fulfill the city residency requirement for the job, Lou and Eleanor moved back into the city, finding a nice middle-class home in a leafy, thickly wooded neighborhood of Riverdale, The Bronx, New York City not too far from the Hudson River. Dogs were allowed. We'll pick the story up on p.331 of Jonathan Eig's 2005 biography of Lou Gehrig ("Luckiest Man"):

    "When he had lived in New Rochelle with his parents, Gehrig, a single man with spare time on his hands, had enjoyed having dogs around the house. He'd been in apartments and been without pets since his marriage to Eleanor, who was no animal lover. But when he moved to Riverdale, he brought with him a new dog -- a white terrier with black patches and had a fence built around the backyard to keep the animal from running away. The dog's name was Yankee. . . . Gehrig adored the animal. Eleanor hated it."

    When Lou died on June 2, 1941 at his home in Riverdale, Eleanor told Lou's vet to destroy the animal, but the vet didn't have the heart to kill a healthy dog. "Thanks to the vet's intervention, a family in Connecticut adopted the pet." (Jonathan Eig, Luckiest Man, the Life and Death of Lou Gehrig, 2005, I'll dig out the page reference later).

    Could this be the small dog with the soft white fur that Cathy (as Mom Gehrig) remembered under regression? I also find it curious that the Byrd/Haupt family dogs are Wheaten Terriers, small to medium sized dogs with soft white fur (presumably the ones shown in the family portrait photo in the photo section of Cathy's book).

    OK. There's that. But it gets even better.

    Two of Lou Gehrig and Christina "Mom" Gehrig's closest confidants and friends during Lou's baseball career with the Yankees were a New York sports writer named Fred Lieb and his wife Mary. If you read the wikipedia write-up for Fred Lieb (1888-1980), you'll get all the standard stuff, Fred covered sports in general and baseball in particular for decades beginning in the 1910s (among many other books, he wrote a book called Baseball As I Have Known It, 1977, which Cathy referenced in her book.) What you don't read in the wikipedia write-up, is that Fred and Mary Lieb were, how shall I put this, Spiritualists (for lack of a better term). They could easily have been senior administrators or senior moderators on this forum. I'll let Jonathan Eig describe them:

    Jonathan Eig, Luckiest Man, the Life and Death of Lou Gehrig, 2005, p. 265:

    "The Liebs were two of the most interesting people orbiting the world of baseball. Fred's knowledge of the game was greater than that of all but a handful of men . . .
    At fifty-one he was far from a grand old man of the press corps. It was his memory that set him apart. He seemed capable of recalling every inning of every game he'd ever seen, and he'd seen thousands . . . . But he lived outside the press box too. He practiced yoga. He believed in reincarnation. He studied telepathy and clairvoyance. He was convinced that his wife had been blessed with special psychic powers, and he wasn't afraid to say so in front of the smartest men he knew. . . ."

    Mary Lieb was even more peculiar. From Jonathan Eig, Luckiest Man,2005, p. 150:

    "Mary was modest, both in her manners and in her appearance. She was a delicate woman, with a long narrow jaw and welcoming eyes. A person could get lost staring into those eyes. . . Strangers tended to confide in Mary Lieb. Married men shared secrets with her that they didn't tell their wives.
    Mary read the Bible almost daily yet studied all brands of religion. She was particularly attracted to Eastern mysticism. She practiced yoga and spoke of telepathic powers, and, along with her husband, became expert at the use of a Ouija board. Sometimes when she meditated, she said, she felt as if another person, a Hindu perhaps, was telling her what to say. Jacob Ruppert [the owner of the Yankees] would ask her to read his palm each spring and forecast whether the Yankees would win the pennant. "Mary, Look again!" he would say, when the outlook was not good."

    From Cathy Byrd's book, The Boy Who Knew Too Much (2017), pp. 119-120, we learn that two of Cathy's closest friends and confidants were a married couple named Tracy and Jeff.

    "Tracy was my go-to person for all matters in the woo-woo zone. She and her husband, Jeff, were among my most trusted confidants when it came to the subject of Christian's reported past-life memories. Over the course of our 15-year friendship, Tracy had spent her free time practicing yoga, meditating , and handcrafting beaded jewelry, while I was busy running marathons, working overtime, and juggling social commitments. The fact that we were polar opposites created an attractive force that had kept our friendship going strong over the years. While I had always been a master at keeping my mind and body in perpetual motion, as if taking a moment to slow down would lead to my certain demise, Tracy was a seeker of peace and tranquility. She relied on intuition where I required cold, hard facts. Tracy also happened to hold the distinction of being the only person in my life who even knew what a past-life regression was. Not only did she know what it was, she had actually experienced one before."

    I think you get the parallel here between the Gehrigs (Lou and Christina) and the Liebs, and Cathy Byrd and her friends, Tracy and Jeff.
     
  19. GuySittingintheStands

    GuySittingintheStands New Member

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    Looks like autumnleaves was right. There were just too many red flags in this story.

    Here are Cathy Byrd's two separate accounts of the 'shaking off the sign' story. The first was written by Cathy no later than March 23, 2014, and probably weeks earlier. The second was published in Cathy's March 2017 book, The Boy Who Knew Too Much, (Hay House, 2017):

    “Our Local Slugger, 5 years old and pitching at the Major League and loving America’s pastime”, Citizens Journal Real News for Ventura County, added by Debra Tash, March 23, 2014 from “Luckiest Kid, A Young Boy’s Past Life Memories and America’s Favorite Pastime” by Cathy Byrd.

    http://citizensjournal.us/our-local...-league-and-loving-americas-favorite-pastime/

    “The most peculiar element of our son’s obsession with baseball was his completely natural form as a lefty, both hitting and pitching. He did a leg kick with his pitch without any instruction and only after asking an ex-professional baseball player friend [probably Rich Rodriguez, b. 1963 MLB career, left-handed pitcher, 1990-2003] did we realize that the reason he would shake his head before throwing a pitch was that he was ‘shaking off the sign’. The same friend had to explain to us what ‘shaking off the sign’ meant.”


    Cathy Byrd March 2017, The Boy Who Knew Too Much (2017, Hay House)

    pp. 6-7 “Christian and I made a return trip to Dodger Stadium a couple of weeks later [in the summer of 2011] for a tour of the stadium on a day when there was no game taking place. The highlights for Christian were sitting on the bench in the dugout where he had seen the Dodger players sitting, and rolling around on the field’s red dirt, which he had affectionately named “Dodger dirt.” When the tour guide gave him permission to practice his hitting and pitching on the dirt track surrounding the field, Christian was overjoyed.

    By now I was an expert at pitching the tiny foam balls, so I managed to pitch to him and shoot a few video clips at the same time. As Christian whacked ball after ball into the stands with his little wooden bat, our tour companions egged him on with their cheers. He then asked me to switch to the role of catcher so he could practice his pitching skills.

    “He’s shaking off the sign!” a woman from our tour group exclaimed.

    “What do you mean, ‘shaking off the sign’? I asked.

    “The way he shakes his head back and forth and up and down before throwing the ball is exactly what the Major Leaue pitchers do.”

    She further explained that the catcher gives the pitcher a sign as to what pitch to throw, and then the pitcher says yes or no, depending on whether or not he is in agreement with the call.”

    “I wonder if the Dodgers would ever let a little kid throw a ceremonial first pitch at a game?” she said, pointing to the mound. ‘That would sure be cute to see that little guy on that big mound.”

    Without knowing it, this knowledgeable woman had planted a seed in my mind.”
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2017
  20. MaxUsernameLimit

    MaxUsernameLimit New Member

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    Hi GuySittingintheStands,

    thanks for digging up the most probable date of Christian's birth!

    Unfortunately, as the birth time of neither Christian nor Ghering is available, the natal analysis may not be correct. However, the time of death of Ghering is available (I'm using wikipedia) and I think there's some significant pattern here. Lou Ghering died on 2 Jun 1941, at 10:10pm, the Moon at that time was at 17 degrees Leo (sidereal). Christian was born with a very close natal conjunction of Mercury, Saturn and Venus at 14-17 degrees Leo. So, this is a connection between the moment of death of Ghering and the moment of Christian's birth, but I am not entirely sure how to interpret it. There's a possibility that Christian's Moon may be conjunct Ghering's natal Saturn, however as the birth time is unavailable, this may be not the case.

    So.. yeah, just an interesting observation. Not proving or disproving anything really.
     
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2017

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