Time travel & switching bodies? What about reincarnation?

Discussion in 'Reincarnation Questions' started by Li. La., Mar 9, 2019.

  1. Li. La.

    Li. La. Senior Member

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    Ok. Just have to share this with you. Please read the linked article below:

    https://www.ancient-code.com/the-st...ell-into-a-coma-and-woke-up-in-the-year-3906/

    Please share your thoughts?

    I'm just thinking if Paul woke up in another body (the body of Andreas Northam) the year 3906(!) - and Paul's future self had been reincarnated, living in the same time frame- how would that even be possible? Or does Paul's future self have to be dead then in order for this to perhaps be possible to happen?

    Or maybe Andreas was the actual future reincarnation of Paul?

    I am just confused, I suppose...o_O
    Anyway, still found the article fascinating.

    Do you think Paul was telling the truth?

    ...................................................................

    Update: Now I found another article claiming that Andres was the reincarnation of Paul:
    http://www.historydisclosure.com/paul-dienach-memories-year-3905-ad/
    Book link.

    /Best Wishes Li La :)
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2019
  2. KenJ

    KenJ Assistant Archivist and Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    I started reading the book (by a different name now) and came upon a different concept than I'd read before -
    "Nevertheless, I am not entirely in a position to know if I’ve interpreted correctly all that this wise man has patiently taught me. It is us, he says, who pass by, not time. We, the human creatures with the short-lived biological destiny, come and go. The dimension of depth eludes us. Our antennas have a very limited capacity. They only form subjective impressions that are totally irrelevant to the true and objective “Great Reality”, the Samith as he called it."

    Dienach, Paul Amadeus. Chronicles From The Future: The amazing story of Paul Amadeus Dienach (p. 55). This Way Out Productions. Kindle Edition.

    I also found, in that in that distant future, they still had cars and celebrated Christmas.
     
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  3. Speedwell

    Speedwell Senior Registered

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    It may be interesting, thought-provoking, even inspiring. But to my view, there are too many layers of obfuscation, or to express it another way, a surfeit of alibis.

    Let's examine them.

    1. The person going by the name of Andreas Northam writes a diary, representing what he has learned on a crash-course in world-history.

    2. The person by the name of Paul Dienach attempts to re-create, from memory, a fresh version of what was in these diaries, written in Swiss-German.

    3. A Greek student named George Papahatzis makes a good effort at translating the text into Greek.

    4. We now have a modern English re-translation and interpretation using the modern idiom into English.

    In addition the identity of Paul Dienach may have been a false name, not traceable to an actual person. The original German text was taken and presumably lost during WWII. The earliest Greek translation was suppressed (in part at least due to objections from the Church) and lost. It only re-appeared apparently due to it being leaked from a hidden collection held by Masons.

    Not only that, but the only parts we would be in a position to verify, that is the actual history which has occurred between the 1920s and today, are conveniently omitted.

    This is sounding like an awfully murky trail of obscurity to me. It's not like we have any first-hand documentation, it is all transmuted through layers of reworking and re-interpretation, at best.

    Personally, I find it fascinating, but I'd consider it as a fable.

    (Apologies for any mistakes I've made in this summarisation. I did it quickly without double-checking each point, don't take this as definitive.)

    edit: reading some of the reviews of the book also hints at a rather unpleasant side to this tale. I'd suggest being cautious.
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2019
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  4. There and back again

    There and back again Senior Member

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    Here is a video for those who want more than just text.

     
  5. KenJ

    KenJ Assistant Archivist and Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Speedwell, those thoughts were on my mind with my post, that is why I mentioned cars and Christmas. The text concerning time standing 'still' and that we each wend our way through it, rather than time being in motion is what struck me about it - just a smack up-side my head.
     
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  6. Speedwell

    Speedwell Senior Registered

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    On reflection, and having slept on the matter, one thing which I think disturbs me most is the Anglo-Nordic nature of the visualised future. I've only read the parts which are available free of charge online, however I found one or two comments on the video posted previously to be a little thought provoking.

    The story focuses strongly on Europe, even mentioning "a thermonuclear war of a medium intensity took place that destroyed Europe with the exception of the northern Scandinavian countries." and "I now think. Stefan, my friend from the future, with all his pride and affection for the ancient Scandinavian blood that runs through his veins, easily came to unjustified conclusions about the 'uncivilized South'."

    What of the present-day civilisations in some of the other parts of the world, such as India and China as well as Russia and the African continent?

    I'm left with the conclusion that this is a work of its time, a German-speaking author (though in Switzerland) during the years after the First World War. It has resonances of the ideas arising in Germany leading to what followed in the 1930s and WWII.

    As such, thought-provoking or not, I'd have to conclude this is a work of fiction.
     

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