Tomo - Japanese / scottish case of 2000

Discussion in 'Children's Past Lives -Age 7 & under' started by SleeplessFox, Jun 1, 2019.

  1. GuySittingintheStands

    GuySittingintheStands Active Member

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    Tomo claimed that the name of the hospital or place where he died was "Muginba Paresu".

    According to google translate:

    "mugen" means 'dream, fantasy; infinite' in Japanese.
    "ba" means 'place; sphere, realm' in Japanese.
    "paresu" means 'palace' in Japanese.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2019
  2. Sheeply

    Sheeply Member

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    I’m a student of the Japanese language and I made an account so I could comment.

    As the others already said, if the mother didn’t have a good grasp on English then what she wrote down is only an approximate, and it doesn’t help that this little kid would have said what he said in a Japanese accent.

    Assuming he said Muginba Paresu as the hospital he was staying in, and assuming that would have been in Scotland, then we can take a guess that he was trying to say something in English.

    What I wanted to say was, if it was “muginba” written down in kana (their non character alphabet) then it would actually be pronounced “mu-gim-ba” because n changes to an m sound when before a b in Japanese. Of course him being a child the m or ba sound could have been like a toddler mumble so maybe it was just “mu-gim” or “mu-gi-b”. It’s hard to tell.

    And Paresu would be pa-re-su. Like what someone said before three could mean parish but, I’d like to point out the Japanese r sounds a bit like a d, l and r mixed together AND the “u” sound on the end of su is often not said in Japanese. (Despite what anime might have you believe). So it could have sounded more like pa-das or pa-ras if it was more of an English R.

    Also wanted to point out that Japanese has an alphabet as well as characters, so whilst what the person above says could be an interpretation of what Tomo said in Japanese “kanji” (their Chinese characters), the mother most likely wrote it down in their alphabet for foreign words (katakana) and May have looked something like this.
    ムギンバ パレス, if she’d have written the words the person above suggested it would have been in kanji and the article would have mentioned it.

    Hope this helps :)

    - I guess at the end of the day it’s really hard when it’s cross language like this, especially with Japanese where it’s spoken in separate syllables unlike English where our sounds flow together. For example, take the word scarf. Japanese people use the word scarf too to mean fashion scarf but it’s pronounce su-kaa-fu. If you say it out loud it sounds like scarf but it’s so different from the original English word you might not be able to guess that without me telling you.
    So the problem with this is, even though we have what his mother heard, it might be impossible to try and turn it back into English without hearing it from him out loud. And even then he might have been trying to say a word that he knew in a Scottish accent which would further complicate the issue.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2019
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  3. KenJ

    KenJ Assistant Archivist and Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Thank you Sheeply for your input and understanding, it was kind of you to taken the time to address this issue.
     
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  4. GuySittingintheStands

    GuySittingintheStands Active Member

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    Sheeply, thank you for joining the discussion. You’re observations are well taken. I’ll defer any comments I might have for a later date. I would only point out that we don’t have to assume anything. We need only go down the list of names methodically, one by one, obtain the death certificates from Scotland’s National Records, and decide if any of the deceased boys match the very specific claims purportedly made by Tomo to his mother as documented by several researchers over the years since 2005. There will either be a “match” – a likely candidate, or there won’t be.

    In the meantime, if anyone is interested in the academic side of things, they should try to get ahold of the following articles that discuss Tomo’s case:

    Ikegawa, A. (2005). Investigation by questionnaire regarding fetal/infant memory in the womb and/or at birth. Journal of Prenatal and Perinatal Psychology and Health,20 (2), 121–133 (available on-line. This was the original article on Tomo).

    Miyao, M. (2007). Jiheishou no hajimari to ninchishougaikasetsu. Gendai Shiso, May issue, 196–211. (Dr. Miyao was the psychologist who examined Tomo in 2005.)
    (available at Stanford University: https://searchworks.stanford.edu/view/4178280
    Call no. (off campus storage): B804 .G42 V.35:NO.4-6 2007 ; I haven’t been able to find this article anywhere else, so if anyone could help obtaining a re-print it would be greatly appreciated. )

    Ohkado, M. (2011). Kakosei no kioku o motsu kodomo ni tsuite: Nihonjin jidou no jirei. Jintaikagaku 20, 33–42. (This was Professor Ohkado’s original paper in Japanese).

    And of course, Professor Ohkado’s 2013 paper on Tomo in UVa’s JSE is available for viewing on-line at academia.edu; you just need to sign in. If you’re at all interested in reading academic papers related to this paper (or any other paper in your field of interest) (they will do send you recommendations automatically to the e-mail address that you provide), I would encourage you to sign up. It’s free and pretty painless.

    Once again, thank you brave Sheeply for chiming in. Please keep checking in as I will be providing updates as the weeks and months progress. I’ll assume you are an undergraduate (or whatever the UK or British Commonwealth equivalent is) in Japanese language studies. Good luck this term!
     
  5. Sheeply

    Sheeply Member

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    Thank you! :) this stuff is super interesting to me so if I can help in any way I can. I hope we can find a match for him. Even if we can’t, it’s certainly very interesting.

    We are called undergraduates here in the UK too :) thanks for the well wishes, good luck on your search too!
     
  6. GuySittingintheStands

    GuySittingintheStands Active Member

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    Sheeply, thanks for your offer. If you have a little free time and can read romanized Japanese writing, you can try to translate the journal article titles into English in the post above. But only if you have some free time. Your studies come first.
     
  7. Sheeply

    Sheeply Member

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    I’ll try!
     
  8. Sheeply

    Sheeply Member

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    Okay so I’ve got a good idea of what the titles say.
    Miyao, M. (2007). Jiheishou no hajimari to ninchishougaikasetsu. Gendai Shiso.

    This probably says “autism’s origin and cognitive disorder hypothesis. Contemporary philosophy”
    I say probably because I can’t see the kanji and some of the word sounds have (not joking) 20+ meanings so I had to make a guess.
    Edit: after some further thought I think it might say “the beginning of autism and cognitive disorder hypothesis”

    Ohkado, M. (2011). Kakosei no kioku o motsu kodomo ni tsuite: Nihonjin jidou no Jirei. Jintai kagaku

    This one says something along the lines of “Child who gained the ability to retain the memory of a previous life: Japanese children’s case. Human body science/sciences”

    Hope this helps! Good practise for me too haha :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2019
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  9. GuySittingintheStands

    GuySittingintheStands Active Member

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    Thanks, Sheeply. Well done.



    (Japanese boy and his mother at 5:55. And there he is again at 8:16. Check out the produce van at 10:10-10:13. Edinburgh seems to be a mecca for tourists. Note especially the Japanese tourists scattered along the parade route.)
     

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    Last edited: Sep 8, 2019
  10. KenJ

    KenJ Assistant Archivist and Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    That would indeed be a "feel-good" thing to do. I've wondered if someone has ever recognized me as being someone in a prior physical experience and are refraining from telling me, it could get mixed up quite a bit as I could have difficulty in determining which lifetime the meeting occurred.
     
  11. GuySittingintheStands

    GuySittingintheStands Active Member

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    Tomo claimed that he died late October 1997 in “Room” 4 on the 7th floor of either a 13-story wing or 7-story wing of a hospital 115 “kilometers” north of his home in or near Edinburgh, Scotland. I google-searched “list of hospitals in Scotland” and found that Wikipedia has a list of over two hundred hospitals in Scotland listed by district. I was especially interested in photographs or floor plans (or both) of hospitals that were open in 1997 and that looked like they may have wings or towers either around 7 or around 13 stories high. If Wikipedia (or NHS Scotland) lacked photographs or floor plans of individual hospitals then I searched google images for them. I was able to come up with a list of candidate hospitals that fit Tomo’s description of the particular hospital he was treated at (having a 7- and/or 13-story tower or wing) and, for several of the hospitals, the location of wards and ward numbers within a particular hospital. Here is the list I came up with divided into 2 parts – hospitals north of Edinburgh; and hospitals west of Edinburgh. (There weren’t any candidate hospitals south or east of Edinburgh and still within Scotland).

    Candidate Hospitals North of Edinburgh:

    1.Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, Scotland
    (7 floors, 128 miles north of Edinburgh)

    2. Victoria Hospital, Kirkcaldy, Scotland
    (10-13 floors, 28 miles north of Edinburgh)

    3. Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, Scotland
    (7 floors with 13-floor lift/ elevator tower, 60 miles north of Edinburgh)

    4. Raigmore Hospital, Inverness, Scotland
    (~ 7 floors, estimated, 155 miles north of Edinburgh)

    Candidate Hospitals West of Edinburgh:

    1.Inverclyde Royal Hospital, Greenock, Scotland
    (7+ floors, estimated, 78 miles west of Edinburgh)

    2. Gartnavel General Hospital, Glasgow City, Scotland
    (10 floors, more or less, estimated, 49 miles west of Edinburgh)

    3. Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow City, Scotland
    (8 floors, more or less, estimated, 46 miles west of Edinburgh)

    4. Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Yorkhill, Glasgow, Scotland
    (formerly called West Glasgow Ambulatory Care Hospital)
    (6-8 floors, estimated, 52 miles west of Edinburgh)
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2019
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  12. GuySittingintheStands

    GuySittingintheStands Active Member

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    Tomo claimed he was born August 9, 1988 and died October 24/25, 1997, age 9. Here are complete lists of all 8, 9, and 10-year-olds who died and were registered in Scotland, 1997-1999. I drew up the lists based on data from the National Records of Scotland’s website:

    www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk

    Complete List of Candidate 8- and 9-year-olds:

    Name, Age, Year of Death, Registered in District of, Match/ No Match

    1. Sam, 8, 1999, Wick
    2. Alistair, 8, 1997, Port Glasgow
    3. John, 9, 1998, Renfrew, no match
    4. Garry, 9, 1997, Dundee, no match
    5. Charles, 9, 1998, Bellshill, no match
    6. Gary, 8, 1998, Dundee, no match
    7. Benjamin, 8, 1998, Lathron
    8. James, 9, 1998, St. Andrews (Fife), no match
    9. George, 8, 1998, Glasgow, Martha St.
    10. Douglas, 9, 1997, Falkirk, no match
    11. Lee, 8, 1997, Penicuik and Glencorse
    12. Daryl, 8, 1997, Glasgow, Martha St.
    13. Dean, 9, 1998, Peterhead, no match
    14. Darren, 9, 1998, Stornoway, no match
    15. David, 8, 1999, Carnoustie
    16. David, 8, 1998, Glenrothes
    17. Ford, 9, 1998, Glasgow, Martha St., no match
    18. Fraser, 9, 1999, Glenrothes
    19. Scott, 9, 1997, Aberdeen, no match
    20. Jamie, 9, 1999, Larbert
    21. Jason, 8, 1998, Bathgate
    22. Joseph, 9, 1998, Kirkintilloch
    23. Ross, 8, 1997, Edinburgh, no match
    24. Kristofer, 9, 1997, Rosskeen, no match
    25. William, 8, 1998, Glasgow, Martha St.
    26. Michael, 9, 1997, Dundee, no match
    27. Phillip, 8, 1997, Duns
    28. Scot, 8, 1997, Glasgow, Martha St.
    29. Uisdean, 8, 1999, Tain
    30. Vijay, 9, 1998, Eastwood and Mearns

    (I included 8-year-olds to be certain we did not miss any 9-year-olds, whose birth year made it appear that they 8, when in fact, based on their actual birthdate, they were 9 at
    date of death. I have gotten the results back for several candidates already, none of which proved to be a "likely candidate", so are marked "no match".)

    Complete List of Candidate 10-year-olds:

    Name, Age, Year of Death, Registered in District of, Match/ No Match

    1. Jack, 10, 1997, Linlithgow, no match
    2. Alan, 10, 1997, North Berwick
    3. John, 10, 1998, Vale of Leven
    4. Adeel, 10, 1997, Cumbernauld
    5. Barry, 10, 1999, Hamilton
    6. Callum, 10, 1998, Strathendrick (Balfron)
    7. Craig, 10, 1997, Edinburgh, no match
    8. Darren, 10, 1998, Bathgate
    9. Derek, 10, 1999, Elgin
    10. Stuart, 10, 1998, Glasgow, Martha St.
    11. Gary, 10, 1997, Dumbarton, no match
    12. Greg, 10, 1998, Nairn
    13. Stephen, 10, 1997, Glasgow, Martha St.
    14. Hazem, 10, 1999, Old Kilpatrick
    15. Micheal, 10, 1999, Aberdeen, no match
    16. Stuart, 10, 1997, Glenrothes
    17. Scott, 10, 1998, Larbert
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2019 at 12:58 PM

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