Vietnam past life memory

Discussion in 'Past Life Memories' started by Beanbag, Oct 16, 2018.

Tags:
  1. Beanbag

    Beanbag Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2018
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    9
    I'm new here and just wanted to share what I've discovered, it's long, so I'm sorry about that. I've never put much stock into reincarnation, as I've never really had any concise evidence, no matter how much I've wanted to believe. However last night I had a dream that I was in a university, but it was a place of people who knew they had past lives, remembered them, and knew each other. I was just visiting a friend, but it wasn't someone I knew in real life.

    As I was waiting for them, I had someone come up to me, ask me my name, and tell me flatly that I had been a Vietnam soldier. Now this isn't the first time I have felt like maybe that was possible, as when I have watched Vietnam documentaries, I get extremely strong feelings of grief, sorrow, and a familiarity. Songs of the time likewise bring about strong feelings. So upon searching I came across this forum, and on one of the threads I saw, someone had posted a video of a past life regression hypnosis session. So I said why not, and gave it a try.

    The memories at first were a bit jumbled, Vietnam and being in a trench in WW1, but I wished to focus on Vietnam. What started to come through clearly, was that I was a helicopter pilot. At first, it was somewhat happy, or as happy as one can be when trying to make the best out of the situation they were in. I was laughing with my copilot as we flew, they were my best friend. I'm not sure what kind of helicopter I was flying, my copilot sat to my right, but the helicopter was armed. It was also capable of evac in an emergency, which is where my next memory led me.

    I'm already tearing up writing this, and I had never expected to experience such strong emotions. We had landed in a clearing to get a group of soldiers out as quickly as possible. The helicopter was taking shots, and they were getting in as fast as they could. As we sat there, a bullet managed to pierce the cockpit glass and killed my copilot, my best friend. That is when I started to panic, and lifted off as soon as I could with everyone inside and flew off over the jungles, hearing the plinking of bullets still hitting the heli. I was feeling in shock and detached as I could see my best friend out of the corner of my eye dead and slumped to the side.

    The next memory, as it was guided, was to the end of my life. I survived the war, and saw myself as an elderly man laying in a hospital room, alone. This is when I broke down. I died completely alone. I could feel it was the 80s, and I was born in 88. Other than that being the decade I died in, I'm not sure why else the 80s make me feel *incredibly* uncomfortable. The 60's feel like at the time, a normal, fine time. Me and my copilot were not drafted, we had been in before this war started.

    In this life I have an affinity for military stuff, I wanted to be a pilot, I love helicopters, and I tried to go into the airforce at 18. However due to my severe anxiety and other mental illness, I have 0 tolerance for stress at all, and was discharged from basic. I am now on disability.

    So yea, a much more intense experience than I thought it would be. Even sitting here I'm getting more fragments, like after landing just being in a haze like nothing was real and wandering around the base. Thanks for reading, typing this all out was comforting.
     
    glia21, tanker, landsend and 3 others like this.
  2. fireflydancing

    fireflydancing just a fly in the sky Staff Member Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2016
    Messages:
    600
    Likes Received:
    383
    Hi @Beanbag

    Welcome to the forum.
    Do you keep a journal? When I read your story, I feel you are still in the middle of the proces of remembering. Probably there is still a lot to come back into your memory.
    Keep us posted! ;)
     
    LBorjaOregon likes this.
  3. Beanbag

    Beanbag Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2018
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    9
    I don't have a journal, but I could start typing everything out as it comes to me. I'm kind of scared, honestly. These are very emotionally intense memories and I hate crying.
     
  4. fireflydancing

    fireflydancing just a fly in the sky Staff Member Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2016
    Messages:
    600
    Likes Received:
    383
    You’ll easily going to forget a lot of details. And memories usually come in cycles. Sometimes you get bombarded with memories and than there’s a period of silence.
    A lot of people journal their past life memories. It’s a great help for yourself to discover patterns. It can even help to ‘drain’ the emotions. As soon as it’s written down, you can take some distance. Let the hurt go.
     
    glia21 and Beanbag like this.
  5. CanSol

    CanSol Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2018
    Messages:
    201
    Likes Received:
    146
    Welcome Beanbag,
    First off start a journal, paper and pen is often easier as you can grab it when you wake from a memory, some memories can fade, just like memories of your current life do but keeping a journal means that if you're later on hit with a memory that you can't place but ties into a previous one you can check your journal

    Experiencing a Past Life memory can be hard, I have Past Life memories for as long asI can remember this life and still get some powerfull ones, although often not visually anymore but rather powerfull thoughts
    I've lived many times and was around for among others WWI, WWII and Vietnam, got killed in all of them and even with my bag full of experiences I went to Afghanistan where my previously gained knowledge became usefull

    We understand what you're going through and are here for you, to listen, offer advice or just for support
     
    BenjaminFR and Beanbag like this.
  6. briski

    briski Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2018
    Messages:
    469
    Likes Received:
    234
    There is quite a lot of warrier type souls on this forum Ive noticed so you are in good company here. Welcome to the forum
     
    Beanbag likes this.
  7. Beanbag

    Beanbag Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2018
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    9
    Thank you everyone :) I really appreciate this. I was nervous, but I'm glad I came here.
     
    fireflydancing and Jim78 like this.
  8. BenjaminFR

    BenjaminFR Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2018
    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    175
    Hello!

    You are in good company here. Thanks for sharing your story with us, and I wish you a lot of peace from reading other people's experiences.

    You are far from alone in remembering a plausible past existence in a war. I do understand you perfectly when you talk about the sorrow and sadness when confronted with related era documentaries.

    I wish you all the best in your journey and will certainly read your future posts with great attention!

    Benjamin
     
    LBorjaOregon and Beanbag like this.
  9. Jupiter 11

    Jupiter 11 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2018
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    30
    Location:
    France
    Welcome to the forum Beanbag,

    As Benjamin said, you'll discover that we are many to remember past lives during war. I myself fought in the trenches during ww1. I know that those memories can be very intense sometimes.
    Hopefully, you'll find people who will guide and support you throughout your journey. :)
     
    Beanbag likes this.
  10. landsend

    landsend Senior Registered

    Joined:
    May 22, 2017
    Messages:
    141
    Likes Received:
    237
    Hey Beanbag

    First of all, how did I just manage to see this? Your thread totally slipped me by.

    I too remember being a chopper pilot in Nam, in my case it ended badly and was shot down and taken prisoner by the VC. You can check out my thread here if you want. I echo the good advice here which is to start writing it down.

    I know it all seems raw at the moment but it does fade, some days are easier than others. I too have suffered with mental issues and anxiety throughout my life due in most part my past life experiences. I have PTSD symptoms.

    Can relate a lot to what you say. The chopper you describe sounds like the UH-1 - Huey - it was piloted upfront with two pilots - the co-pilot was known as flying peter pilot. In addition, there was also an aircraft commander. The Huey was a versatile bird that could be modified for different purposes. Evac birds were kept to the bare minimum, usually had a door gunner/machine gun. It could also be souped up to hold rockets and the like, especially before the Huey Cobras were bought in but due to its size and weight couldn’t hold as many rockets as the Cobra. Cobras were not passenger choppers, they were attack helicopters manned by two pilots, one above, one below in pilot/gunner positions.

    Recommend you check out the book 'Chickenhawk' by Robert Mason if/when you feel up to it. It describes the experiences of a Nam pilot. I confess I have this book but have not found the time to read it yet. I'm a fast reader but everything related to Nam takes me five times as long to read. I often try to avoid everything about Nam, reading about it, etc, so have to force myself to sit and read and often have to put the book down. Hence why it takes so long to read anything about that subject.

    Can tell you that ground troops revered these birds in Nam, they were the angels from above (or devils for the VC). Probably it was one of the hardest jobs in the whole of Nam. These men put their behinds on the line all the time and often with little reward. They were just giant targets for VC.

    Thanks for sharing
    Landsend
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2018
    Beanbag and Jim78 like this.
  11. landsend

    landsend Senior Registered

    Joined:
    May 22, 2017
    Messages:
    141
    Likes Received:
    237
    Also your feelings of isolation after Nam in that life sounds about right. Vietnam veterans were treated especially bad compared to other era veterans... they were considered by some to be criminals. It’s a disgrace in truth. Not only did those men have to deal with having been through all the experiences of war but they had to deal with the feeling their own country men were against them, and often had to justify their reasons for being there.
     
  12. landsend

    landsend Senior Registered

    Joined:
    May 22, 2017
    Messages:
    141
    Likes Received:
    237


    I found this docu echoes the feelings quite well.
     
    Beanbag and fireflydancing like this.
  13. landsend

    landsend Senior Registered

    Joined:
    May 22, 2017
    Messages:
    141
    Likes Received:
    237
    Finally, I want to pick up on a detail I noticed, you mentioned dying in the 80s. Most chopper pilots in Vietnam were relatively young. My previous self was on the older side for a pilot. Many were trained just for the purpose, but like you my past self was in the Army before Vietnam broke out. He would have been, however, in his 40s in the 80s. Even if your self had been in his 40s in Nam he would have only been in his 60s in the 80s so it depends what you constitute as elderly. Hope you don’t think I’m nitpicking here, the world weary feelings following Nam made men feel a lot older than their age. I know my past self with all he went through looked like an older man at the end of his life, though he was probably in his 40s, so that’s possibly something to take into account.
     
  14. CanSol

    CanSol Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2018
    Messages:
    201
    Likes Received:
    146
    Truth
    Even the sound of one can bring a Nam vet, whether still alive or reincarnated, to tears

    Been wondering when you'd show up :)
     
    landsend likes this.
  15. Beanbag

    Beanbag Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2018
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    9
    I'm going to check out that doc, thanks for sharing that. Your comment regarding elderly and 60s makes sense, I say elderly because I saw myself laying in a hospital bed. I generally associate end of life laying in a bed with hospice and being relatively old. Though I know deep grief can shorten ones life as well. But no I don't think you're nitpicking at all :) I appreciate the analysis. Since doing that one regression I haven't done another, I'm terrified given how emotional it made me. I apologize for the slow response.

    I also want to mention, that it's starting to make more and more sense as to why everything from those era's make me *incredibly* uncomfortable. The cars, the fashion, even something as simple as a milkshake bar or a drive in diner.

    Edit: Looking at pictures of the UH1 makes me feel emotional, but not necessarily in a completely negative way. Watching a video of one starting up, the sounds it makes and flying gives me intense chills and I had to stop.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2018
    landsend likes this.
  16. tanker

    tanker Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2018
    Messages:
    215
    Likes Received:
    215
    Location:
    England
    Welcome to the forum, Beanbag. I've only just found your post, and I'm glad you found it comforting to tell your story.

    I'm also new to this. Telling my story to so many people after years of silence has done me a lot of good, so I'd like to encourage you to keep going with it. I fought well before your time, in WW2, but soldiers are soldiers no matter when. It may be that Vietnam was a worse experience than mine, although heaven knows mine ended up badly enough, but I think life was simpler at that time than in the 80s, and we went in not knowing too much.

    I'm hoping that getting this all out in the open will help you deal with your stress and sadness. I'm still learning, on that score, but more optimistic. It's not an easy journey, but you have support out here.
     
    Jim78, KenJ and Beanbag like this.
  17. landsend

    landsend Senior Registered

    Joined:
    May 22, 2017
    Messages:
    141
    Likes Received:
    237
    I sympathise with you, and understand. You may want to try meditation, too, if you feel the need. I've noticed that meditation helped me open up and see things that needed to be seen, but I can get up easily, walk away and leave the memories and come back to them later. Writing it down is therapeutic, and may prove useful in just helping you to understand what's going on. God knows I've filled about six notebooks in the past couple of years. Often times these things take a long time to unfold too... I know that too well. I'm at the point where I'd like to reach a resolution, but alas, I can't do that currently with the level of information I have. I understand about the chopper sounds. For me the sound of a Huey is relaxing, calming almost. I think it's because for me it represents being safe. Being away from the conflict 'down there'. On the other hand, if I listen to jungle sounds coupled with rain and thunder, it can send me into an anxiety spiral. I was watching on YouTube a Vietnam Vet recently show slides to his kids of when he flew the AH-1 G (Cobra) in Vietnam, he was describing in detail the chopper. I couldn't watch the whole thing. Too much pain and sadness there. I did make a trip to an airbase to see a later model on display, though, it was good to see in person just to get a scale for the thing. It also gave me some useful insights into how the chopper may have crashed. It might prove useful in the future to go see a Huey up close if you can.

    Best,
    Landsend
     
    Beanbag likes this.

Share This Page