Will they remember?

Discussion in 'Children's Past Lives -Age 7 & under' started by Roberto, Nov 7, 2018.

  1. Roberto

    Roberto Member

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    Would a child remember their past lives if I told them about past lives? I’ve been wondering about this for a while and also how spiritually aware would they be? Would it be a bad idea or a good idea to do this? Please and thank you for responses. :)
     
  2. LBorjaOregon

    LBorjaOregon Active Member

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    I think you can do anything you want.
    That being said, when Ian Stevenson and other researchers studying children’s past life memories collect data and do interviews, they like it when the child’s report is spontaneous. I guess one reason is because it is too easy to ask leading questions. I think there would be a way to tell a child about past lives and not have it be a leading question. Like giving them an example: “did you know that there’s a boy named James who remembered having a different life before he was born?” I don’t know, I’m not an interviewing expert, just trying to illustrate my point. I saw a cute video of a mom asking her 4 year old, “where do you think you were before you were born?” And he had this very elaborate answer about how you’re chosen for your life - nothing on a specific incarnation but definitely in line with reincarnation. Just my 2 cents!
     
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  3. Roberto

    Roberto Member

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    Oh okay thanks for your reply. :]
     
  4. Speedwell

    Speedwell Senior Registered

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    I would tread carefully. Anything you say might become an invitation to play a game. It might result in both parent and child being uncertain whether anything said is spontaneous, or merely a result of prompting.

    Maybe the best path is to simply listen, no matter what is on a child's mind, it is worth paying attention to, past-life related or not.
     
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  5. baro-san

    baro-san Senior Member

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    Before doing that, I would ask (myself) if anybody could be hurt / affected, and who would benefit. My first concern would be the well-being of the child.
     
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  6. glia21

    glia21 explorer21

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    My two older kids never mentioned anything about a past life. They are very matter of fact. Only once my daughter told me a story that was on her mind for quite a long time - she compared it to a dream. When she spoke about it she was 7 years old. It involved her two closest friends and they might have been on a vulcano environment together - she said sometimes in kindergarten they used to talk about it since apparently all 3 of them remembered something.. sounded a little sci- fi but she was very serious. She said the story was fading away and getting less important. I only listened and was very interested but didn't come up with a PL explanation. She wasn't looking for an explanation either. So I would recommend to stay open minded and just listen to whatever might come to the surface.
     
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  7. Roberto

    Roberto Member

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    Yeah maybe they would go deep into depression or something like that.
     
  8. landsend

    landsend Senior Registered

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    Take into account that reincarnation in a lot of Eastern countries is widely accepted, so children in those environments grow up with that in mind. I don't think whether you talk to your children about reincarnation or not will influence their thoughts, really. I think a lot is to do with the parents, and how receptive they are. Many kids may talk about past lives/exhibit strange behaviours and if parents are unaware of reincarnation they will totally miss the cues.

    I've talked to my oldest child about reincarnation, because he had heard me talking to his father about a person called John, and he was curious who John was. That was fairly recently though, and he's now seven years old. He understood the concept of reincarnation without me having to explain it much, if that makes sense. My son when he was around two told me spontaneously that when he had lived before, he had been a 'funny man', and lived in a big house. At that point I had never talked to him about reincarnation. He's also had some pretty bad nightmares about being in a car crash since then, so do wonder if that is all related. However he seems to have forgotten about the 'funny man' and also the nightmares for now. By 'funny man' I assume he means he was a comedian, and the big house makes me think he made a living from it - but that's my assumptions there which I'm not going to impress on him.

    My middle daughter has exhibited spontaneous pl memories. She is a very lively child, not afraid by most things, but she can not stand fireworks. When she was around 20 mos. old we had fireworks in the back yard. She became hysterical, ran in the house, and grabbed the nearest thing to protect herself, which happened to be my husbands bicycle helmet. When she was as little as 12 mos. she took to a sieve I had which was very much like the shape of the old Tommy helmets, and would place it on her head. She had some play eggs and liked to rub them against her jumper when she was as little as 12 mos. old, something that someone bought up in a rural environment might do. Me and my husband had never done that before seen as our eggs are store bought. She would methodically take each egg, clean it and place it back in the plastic box. I've also caught her on more than one occasion spit shining her Peppa Pig boots -- again never done that in front of her, and have no idea where she got the idea of it from. Again never mentioned reincarnation to her then, and she too hasn't opened up beyond that. I have a wait and see approach -- I guess one day she might want to open about it, either in her childhood or later. She still becomes very distressed by fireworks, in particular the loud rocket types that 'woosh' then 'bang', she cries and clings to me if she hears one go off. She's still too little for me to explain fully to her reincarnation, in my opinion.

    I do wonder if I would have missed those cues with my daughter if I had not known about reincarnation myself first hand.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2018
  9. baro-san

    baro-san Senior Member

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    There is a risk of trauma too, if they remember traumatic events.
     
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  10. There and back again

    There and back again Senior Member

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    Being afraid of fireworks is telling that something horrible had happened either an accident or worse war with my guess being WW1 as shelling the trenches messed a lot of people up.
     
  11. landsend

    landsend Senior Registered

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    Yes, I’ve considered it. My husband actually had a dream of her as a WWII pilot which included a name, but have not said anything to her about it. She does have a fascination for planes, her favourite shoes are her shoes with little red aeroplanes on them which she inherited from my son. To be honest she’s a little warrior soul, has been aware of her surroundings from day one, it wouldn’t surprise me she has been here more than a fair share of times. When I gave birth to her she gave me that look of ‘oh no, not here again!’ She hated being a baby, looked like a little grumpy old man and would cry all hours. She’s a much better toddler thank God.
     
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  12. tanker

    tanker Senior Registered

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    landsend, interesting how early in life these things show themselves. From my experience, I knew and saw things I couldn't have known in this life well before I openly expressed the PL at the age of three. I have very clear memories of my first bedroom, even lying in a cot, seeing things I couldn't explain to myself and was too young to vocalise. But the crushing terror of my death was with me from the start. It was physical, well before three. I dreaded going to sleep, knowing what would happen. I know that my parents had me treated in some kind of hospital for a short while too, although that did nothing to stop the nightmares. I can't equate how it was that I was such a happy child, yet so troubled at the same time, and with a nervous tic (trying to get something off my back) that nobody could explain. I was always begging them to get me a gun, too, and insisting the name they'd given me was not my real name. Your daughter is lucky that she has a mother who is prepared, and understands. You have interesting times ahead, I think.
     
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  13. Ritter

    Ritter Senior Member

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    Try military music from the various factions and services. You can tell right away when a child remembers something. "Their song" would make them HAPPY. It makes the heart soar with familiar memories of camaraderie. For me that song is Marschlied der Leibstandarte, as well as many that are found in the SS Liederbuch (Songbook), such as Wenn Alle Untreu Werden or Schwarzbraun ist die Haselnuss or Die Wacht am Rhein. My daughter is ironically very fond of old russian folk music, horse jumping and ballet. Like a proper little noble. Her word for yes is "da". She has a very noble, almost dainty and graceful bearing that she certainly did not get from me, either. I look like a lumberjack, and she looks like a future ballet dancer. If your daughter likes airplanes and shows signs, play her a few U.S, British, German and Soviet songs relating to pilots and paratroopers. I mostly know the German ones, naturally. Even us tankers liked them, especially the paratrooper's song. Those were some fantastic and brave soldiers.

    For pilots: Flieger, grüss mir die Sonne
    For paratroopers: Grün ist unser fallschirm
     
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  14. tanker

    tanker Senior Registered

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    I still sing Marschlied der Leibstandarte, my second favourite. First is Die Fahne Hoch. Also Panzerlied, obviously. Makes the heart soar, for sure. Strange how the old tunes are familiar, across the divide. That's a good idea to try them out on children, to see which they like.
     
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  15. Ritter

    Ritter Senior Member

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    Ob's stürmt oder schneit, ob's die Sonne uns lacht...

    Holy hell, yes. I admit to playing all of them in my car all the time. Or on sleepless nights. Or when I drink. I seldom drink and never in public. Perhaps once per year and when my wife visits her parents and I am home without wife or children. But when I drink at all, I get very drunk with a friend of mine, who does not remember clearly but whom I am sure was there, too. I think he was one of Kurt Meyer's officers for some reason. Emil, the one who got motivated in Greece with a hand grenade. He hates that one and I laugh at it so badly I think I am going to faint. I miss that maniac, I wonder where he is now? Meyer, I mean. A very good man. We make German food, drink German beer, have some schnaps and sing/play soldatenlieder. Also bavarian folk music. Usually goes on for twelve hours or so, until we fall asleep. It's a safe outlet. Nobody gets thrown in jail for hating this or that. Nobody gets punched. Not after he lost that contest, in all friendliness, anyway.
     
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  16. landsend

    landsend Senior Registered

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    Not sure I want to induce any memories within her, I think that let nature take its course... she may not even have to remember at all. Amnesia really is a blessing. However if she needs to recall, she will in her own time and I'll be there to help her.
     

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