Academic paper

Discussion in 'Reincarnation Questions' started by ssake, Feb 25, 2020.

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  1. ssake

    ssake Senior Registered

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    I've posted, on Academia.edu, an academic-style paper (given that I am not affiliated with any academic institutions), entitled "Defeating the Cryptomnesia Objection in the Study of Reincarnation, with a Unique Adult Case." The direct URL is:

    https://stephensakellarios.academia.edu/research
     
  2. 4d4m

    4d4m Active Member

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    I read your paper, it's very interesting. If I am understanding this correctly you have the life chain of a poet in your proof?
     
  3. ssake

    ssake Senior Registered

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    Of course, the word "proof" must be used advisedly. It's never used in formal science, as I understand (except for "mathematical proofs"), although I tend to use it for the general public, in defiance and to stir up controversy. I make it clear, however, that I consider "proof" to be relative, on a continuum. Mathew Franklin Whittier didn't consider poetry to be his forte, even though "The Raven," which was actually written by himself, ended up being one of the most famous poems of 19th-century America (even more so than his famous brother's poem, "Snow-Bound"). Admittedly, that's partly because Edgar Allan Poe, who stole it, was a kind of literary rock star of the period (legitimate or self-created, as the case may be). This would be somewhat analogous to the song "Country Roads," which was written by Bill Danoff and Taffy Nivert, but made famous by John Denver, except that Denver paid for the song and acknowledged its original authorship, whereas Poe stole "The Raven."

    Mathew wrote primarily in one style--what you see in "The Raven" and "Lady Geraldine's Courtship"--a style which I *think* was used mostly for the religious poetry of the day. I have yet to find a scholarly term for it. Today, if pressed, I *can* write in that style, though I tend to use it privately rather than publicly. When I was younger, I suffered from severe "writer's block," but after I discovered my past life as MFW, that entirely disappeared--*except* for poetry.
     
  4. KenJ

    KenJ Moderator Emeritus

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    I read it also, I had not considered posting a dissertation in a blog, not even sure how to create one. what surprised me where the inclusions of euphemistic quotes that were so different from my familiar ones. Like "The proof is in the poff" where I learned it as "The proof is in the Pudding" which I found distracting, but I also found it interesting. You certainly spent a long and twisted path in assembling it.

    If you were like me, you learned how to do research and understand things easier, essentially How to learn.
     
  5. SeaAndSky

    SeaAndSky Senior Registered

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    Hi Ssake,

    I got started, but haven't finished it yet. However, I did want to mention that I like the photograph you have with the paper (which I assume is more recent). I think you should update your avatar, especially as your "new" look is closer in appearance to the engraving of Matthew Franklin Whittier. This is a small point, and certainly not definitive, but interesting.

    Cordially,
    S&S
     
  6. 4d4m

    4d4m Active Member

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    You got me, I studied a lot of math. I really liked it your paper. I think your argument and evidence are convincing. You are, with me anyway, singing to the choir. Have you compared the birth charts?
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2020
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  7. Native Son

    Native Son Senior Member

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    Academically speaking, I'm expressing my opinion on the opinion that has been put forth on plagiarism. Here, I'm only addressing your claim that Dickens plagiarized the Christmas Carol.

    I believe that you may have point. However, if it's a case of plagiarism, it seems that, perhaps, Dickens did not plagiarize from an obscure, and unfounded author, MFW, the brother of the well known poet, John Whittier. There is no academic history anywhere found to substantiate any credit due to Matthew Whittier, nor to his first wife, for being the original authors of A Christmas Carol. But interesting enough, the plot and theme, or rather, the moral of the story within the classic accredited to Charles Dickens is one that goes back to Jesus Christ. It appears that there are those that see a very close similarity to one of the stories told to us by a great and well established story teller. Therefore, I tend to also agree with those that give credit to Jesus's story telling for inspiring Dickens to take something given to us by Jesus, and then embellishing the theme to the point of spinning and weaving a much longer and modernly adorned tale to Dickens' own times and environment.

    I'm going to post the link, and some of the contents of this interesting opinion that Dickens plagiarized from Jesus, to give us one of his many classic stories. And I would be interested to see how Matthew Whittier would have responded if indeed he was the original source of writing A Christmas Carol, as claimed by a future reincarnation of himself. Did Matthew Whittier plagiarize from Luke 16:19-31?

    http://theconversation.com/charles-dickens-the-man-who-invented-christmas-plagiarized-jesus-87936

    Some Dickens scholars believe the author’s 1843 visit to sooty Manchester, or to “the black streets of London,” (as he described them in a letter to a friend) influenced him. It may be that the fable was a moral reminder from Dickens to himself, as he teetered on financial ruin. This is the theory proposed in the book by Les Standiford on which this year’s movie is based.

    Did Dickens in fact invent Christmas, as we know it? Hollywood may think so, but others, like David Parker in his Christmas and Charles Dickens vehemently disagree.

    Whatever your opinion, the prevailing wisdom is that A Christmas Carol isn’t particularly religious. As a professor of biblical studies at Concordia University and also a Lutheran minister, I have a different reading.

    It’s true that the celebration of the season which Scrooge discovers has much more to do with generosity, family gatherings and large cooked birds, than the Nativity. But maybe those seeking explicit scriptural references in Dickens’ story are underestimating the Victorian novelist’s skill — and his audacity. Perhaps A Christmas Carol contains an alternative to the Bible rather than a simple borrowing from it. And perhaps that’s the point.

    Jesus was a master story-teller
    Jesus, by all accounts another master story-teller, told a parable that, stripped of Dickens’ English waistcoats, ledgers, fog and shutters, could almost be a mirror to A Christmas Carol:

    “There once was a rich man. A poor man named Lazarus lived at his gate, with nothing to eat. Lazarus died and was carried by the angels to Abraham’s side. The rich man also died.”

    There follows, in Jesus’ tale, an exchange between the rich man, who is in torment, and Abraham, who acts as the guardian of paradise. It’s hard not to think of the innocent Lazarus as a precursor to Tiny Tim.

    First the rich man asks for his own relief from hell. When that’s denied, he pleads: “I beg you, send Lazarus to my father’s house. I have five brothers. Let him warn them so they don’t come to this place of agony.” Abraham replies: “They have Moses and the prophets. They must listen to them.”

    “No, Father Abraham!” cries the rich man, “But if someone from the dead goes to them, they will change” (Luke 16:19-31).

    One can almost hear the chains of Morley’s ghost rattling. What would have happened if Father Abraham had said yes? Something very like a first-century version of A Christmas Carol.

    Let’s not forget that the people of our western English-speaking past, especially artists and writers, were imbued with Biblical references and ideas. As Northrop Frye, among others, has argued, they lived and created in a world shaped by the rhythms, narratives, images and conceptions (or misconceptions) of the King James Bible.

    Was Dickens familiar with Christian scriptures? All evidence points to the fact that he was more acquainted than most. Despite an antipathy to organized religion, from 1846 to 1849 Dickens wrote a short biography of Jesus for his children, titled The Life of our Lord.
     
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  8. Speedwell

    Speedwell Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    This line - “But if someone from the dead goes to them, they will change” - echoes many accounts of Near-Death Experiences where often a person undergoes a re-evaluation of their values and of what is important in life. Not all of them are influential, but there is a sincerity and directness about such experiences which can be more approachable than lines from scripture, which sometimes is treated with reverence rather than as a means of understanding simple truths.

    Was Dickens familiar with NDEs? Certainly there is an impression that they are a recent phenomenon, brought about by advances in resuscitation techniques. But there seem to be scattered incidents throughout history of spontaneous returns to life, apparently from the dead. Some of them may have told stories, passed by word-of-mouth but not shouted loudly for fear of ridicule which could have reached the inquisitive ears of Dickens.

    That's a lot of maybes, but it does seem that there is a lot in common between the transformation in A Christmas Carol and that occurring during and after real-life NDEs.
     
  9. Native Son

    Native Son Senior Member

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    I'm not quite certain that I understand your points, and how they relate to the researcher claiming that an established and renowned historical figure such as Dickens plagiarized from an obscure and nearly unknown, and definitely, not an accredited small town humorist. The point remains that it's easy to note that some academics, such as the source cited, can see just where Dickens may have "borrowed" the theme for his A Christmas Carol.

    Now, as far as NDE's and the more modern accounts of those claiming their accounts of NDE, it is important to keep in perspective that many claim to have gone to heaven and met Jesus there, before coming back to the living. Just as there are those that claim of having gone to hell, and then returning. In both cases, the persons experiencing the NDE usually have a serious evaluation of their lives, one being inspired by the rewards of heaven, and the other being moved to betterment by fear of penalties to be suffered in hell. Since both heaven and hell are ideas contained in old religious texts, it would not be unfounded that those experiencing and telling us of their NDEs were influenced by these texts.

    As far as Luke 16:19-31, and specifically, "But if someone from the dead goes to them, they will change”, I'm of opinion that Luke/Jesus may have plagiarized from Plato/Socrates. Because, what may be the most well know NDE account to academics, and Dickens no doubt must also have read Plato, is contained in the dialogue, Republic. I have cited parts of it on this forum in the past. It's contained in the last part of the dialogue, book ten, and the NDE is usually referred to as the myth of Er. In this "myth" we have the theme of the dead making the journey to the other world, making very keen and lengthy observation there, and instructed to return to the living and provide the information to the living, so as to be a warning, and meant to make all of us re-evaluate the way we live while in the physical world.

    From Plato's Republic.

    Well, I said, I will tell you a tale; not one of the tales which Odysseus tells
    to the hero Alcinous, yet this too is a tale of a hero, Er the son of Armenius,
    a Pamphylian by birth. He was slain in battle, and ten days afterwards, when
    the bodies of the dead were taken up already in a state of corruption, his body
    was found unaffected by decay, and carried away home to be buried. And on
    the twelfth day, as he was lying on the funeral pile, he returned to life and told

    them what he had seen in the other world. He said that when his soul left the body
    he went on a journey with a great company, and that they came to a mysterious place at
    which there were two openings in the earth; they were near together, and over against them
    were two other openings in the heaven above. In the intermediate space there were judges seated,
    who commanded the just, after they had given judgment on them and had bound their sentences
    in front of them, to ascend by the heavenly way on the right hand; and in
    like manner the unjust were bidden by them to descend by the lower way on
    the left hand; these also bore the symbols of their deeds, but fastened on their
    backs. He drew near, and they told him that he was to be the messenger who
    would carry the report of the other world to men, and they bade him hear and
    see all that was to be heard and seen in that place.


    Did Dickens really read Plato? How about this.

    Plato's Republic: A Tale of Two Cities
    London and Paris were the two cities in Charles Dickens' novel. Unlike Dickens, Plato presents two nameless cities that are rough facsimiles of real ones.
     
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  10. Speedwell

    Speedwell Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    I was responding to your own post suggesting that the Biblical Luke may have been the source.

    With respect, your summary of the typical NDE and subsequent response owes more to strong belief in a particular interpretation of religious doctrine than to actual NDE accounts.

    Some NDE accounts include inferences about the identity of some unidentified benevolent figure, but the actual identity is usually unspecified.

    More relevant here, a good proportion of NDEs result in a person abandoning their previous beliefs, perhaps because it presented an obstacle rather than an aid to their new-found clarity of understanding. Similarly, it may lead to break-up of relationships as a new outlook may no longer be compatible with the views of an existing partner.

    It is this wholesale shift in worldview, an abandonment of previous views which characterises many NDEs.

    By contrast, seeking the rewards of heaven or avoiding the threat of hell is part of the old viewpoint, the very viewpoint which is superceded. The reward-and-punishment model serves more as a means of exerting control by an authoritarian organisation.

    It's worth mentioning that there are some hellish rather than uplifting NDE accounts, though they sometimes form part of a larger experience and need to be seen in context. At any rate, the threat of hellfire-and-damnation is found in a very small proportion of NDE cases. It should not be entirely ignored, but should not be overstated.It is also important not to neglect the fresh insights provided by the NDE - it would be inappropriate to merely view these through the lens of traditional or pre-existing beliefs. For example it is sometimes seen that souls in a hell-like environment are free to leave at any time - but seem unaware of that. There are other insights too.

    Most cases seem to involve overwhelming love which is felt, but is indescribable, and a frequently anonymous guide. There is very often a life-review where past events, often small and long-forgotten, are recalled, with an emphasis on seeing (and indeed feeling) the impacts of a person's actions on other people.

    Sometimes there is also a vision of some future events, such as a parent witnessing as-yet unborn children who may be part of their future.

    It is these last parts in particular, the life-review and preview of the future which reflects directly on Dickens's Christmas Carol. Likewise, the transformation, abandonment of prior views and beliefs also fits into the Dickens narrative.

    My point here is that the NDE accounts are arguably a rather better fit as a proposed source than the passage in Luke which you previously presented.
     
    Last edited: Feb 29, 2020
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  11. Li-la

    Li-la Senior Member

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    Hi!

    Thank you for sharing your report. I enjoyed it. May I ask why do you only write poetry for yourself and your inner circle in this life? I would hate to think the past stand in the way of your present and your future. If you were cheated in this past life of the work you did, what better way to blossom in this life by publishing your own work and getting your own credit for it, small or big does not matter. I think if you do, it will set your spirit free. :)

    Best Wishes

    Li La
     
    Last edited: Feb 29, 2020
  12. Speedwell

    Speedwell Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Further to my previous comments, I should add that I'm not the only person to see a connection between A Christmas Carol and a near-death experience.

    See for example,
    WAS 'A CHRISTMAS CAROL' A NEAR-DEATH EXPERIENCE?
    Or on a more scholarly track,
    Death and the Primacy of Love in Works of Dickens, Hugo, and Wilder
     
    Last edited: Feb 29, 2020
  13. Native Son

    Native Son Senior Member

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    Are NDE accounts, arguably, a better fit for Dickens' source in writing A Christmas Carol than a far-fetched, unsubstantiated, unfounded, uncorroborated, whimsical, claim of plagiarizing from Matthew F. Whittier? Because that is what we are commenting on, a claim, or rather, a part of the claim that is meant for the eyes of academics (scholars) that Dickens plagiarized most of the content of his A Christmas Carol.

    In other words, I presented one academic's view, (a professor of biblical studies) as to where Dickens may have gotten the "idea" for his novel, A Christmas Carol, and you, Speedwell, introduced NDEs as a more likely source for Dickens' "idea." And you even added, in a separate post, more academic munition to NDE in support of what seems as the real source from where Dickens may have gotten the theme for his novel, as the following quote suggests. In other words, what we are saying is, or rather, our opinion is that, based on academic evidence, along with logical speculation, any academics that may stumble on the academic style paper in question, will very likely find even more compelling academic evidence that Dickens did not plagiarize from Matthew Whittier, even if the bother to look up this academically, nearly unknown figure.

    However, if we are to discuss NDE's themselves and apart from the application to this thread, that is entirely another matter. The mere fact that there are contradicting accounts of what is experienced and reported in episodes of known NDEs, the contradictions introduce suspicion and disbelief into the picture, especially from the scientific community.

    Then if we are to reinforce NDEs as the source for Dickens' inspiration, we need to root out just when in history NDE accounts became well known, at least well known to academics such as Dickens. Here is just one account that shows that, medically, NDE was identified and discussed by a French doctor back in 1740. And following the link I'm posting an excerpt.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/science...covered-inside-18th-century-medical-text.html

    A report from a French physician in 1740 contains what is thought to be the oldest medical record of a near-death experience has been discovered.
    The discovery was made by anthropologist Dr Phillipe Charlier, who bought the book for about $1 (60p) in an antique shop.
    In the book a patient is being described as falling unconscious and then seeing a pure bright light that they interpreted as being Heaven.
    Titled ‘Anecdotes de Médecine’, the report was written by French military physician Pierre-Jean du Monchaux, reports LiveScience.
    At the time Monchaux attempted to explain the phenomenon by saying that an increase in blood flow to the brain could be the cause behind the visions.
    However, modern physicians now think that the odd sensations are actually caused by a lack of blood flow to the brain.


    Plato's Republic, myth of Er.

    Now when the spirits which were in the meadow had tarried seven days, on
    the eighth they were obliged to proceed on their journey, and, on the fourth day
    after, he said that they came to a place where they could see from above a line
    of light,
    straight as a column, extending right through the whole heaven and
    through the earth, in colour resembling the rainbow, only brighter and purer

     
  14. Native Son

    Native Son Senior Member

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    Abstract:
    Throughout his canon, Dickens significantly adapts the writing on the wall from Daniel 5, often haunted by Plato's "Allegory of the Cave" wall in The Republic, to illustrate spectral "truths" requiring the reader's comparable intertextual interpretation. The shared components of what we might call Dickens's Daniel-Plato complex include ghostly script, shadowy walls, delusive lighting, critical interpretations, rewards and punishments, judgments, prophecies, and apocalyptic cataclysms. From Sartor Resartus to Dracula, Victorian fiction is riddled with hybrid Danielic-Platonic metaphors, but Dickens's novels most consistently appropriate the trope to figure cryptic foreshadowings, enigmatic hermeneutics, and often blurred and ironic interfacings between illusions and realities. The comparative character clusters and plots in Dombey and Son and Bleak House invoke Dickens's Daniel-Plato complex more creatively than those in any of his other novels. Dickens employs the complex in Dombey chiefly to help dramatize and evaluate major characters from Captain Cuttle to Carker, Florence, and Dombey himself, while in Bleak House the complex more subtly suggests transpersonal (and overlapping) religious, sociological, political, psychological, and aesthetic possibilities. Ultimately, then, Dickens's Daniel-Plato complex challenges his readers to discover the mysteriously hidden "interpretation thereof" in his fiction.

    Journal Article
    Dickens's Daniel-Plato Complex: "Dombey" and "Bleak House"
    Mark M. Hennelly Jr.
    upload_2020-2-29_9-6-58.jpg
    Dickens Studies Annual
    Vol. 39 (2008), pp. 97-126 (30 pages)
    Published by: Penn State University Press
     
  15. 4d4m

    4d4m Active Member

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    So I perused most of those posts but not in too much detail. It might be a bit misleading to say the Tale of Two Cities is plagiarized. Particularly in a reincarnation thread. As souls reincarnate, they tend to follow the same life patterns. Even find the same friends. If this is so then also they would act en masse. By that I mean, the Tale of Two Cities, if inspired by real events, would also exist in other places in history. For instance Judges 19 - 21. Or maybe even Sodom and Gamorra. What I'm saying here is these different "tales" of two cities where probably based on cities populated for the most part by the same souls.
     
  16. Native Son

    Native Son Senior Member

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    It was not a statement of plagiarism, as it was a matter of corroboration that Dickens was familiar with Plato's writings. And this was to provide a possible source as to where Dickens may have gotten his ideas for writing some of his novels, if his ideas were indeed borrowed/suggested and not original. Again, this thread is about a posting to a site frequented by academics, where the essay posted contains claims of a reincarnated soul knowing something that no one else has ever known. And this unknown is that Dickens was not the original author of A Christmas Carol, and he only slightly modified the content and claimed sole authorship, without acknowledging that, supposedly, Matthew Whittier had, "secretly," given him an already completed written work. Here is a portion of that claim, as per the linked essay in the OP https://stephensakellarios.academia.edu/research

    In mid-2006—roughly one year after discovering the existence of Mathew Franklin Whittier—I made a deliberate note in my online blog of May 31, 2006:
    Here‟s something that might be useful as evidence. I have a strong feeling that I had some impact or influence on Charles Dickens‟s writing of “A Christmas Carol,” as Mathew Whittier. But I have seen absolutely no evidence in that regard. Not only did I have no objective reason to suspect such a thing, I readily admit that the very idea seems ludicrous on the face of it. I didn‟t begin researching my past-life case in earnest until 2009; and when I finally began digging into the history of the writing of “A Christmas Carol,” I was astonished to find that the more deeply I delved into the matter, the more plausible my statement became. In fact, I uncovered an entirely plausible scenario for the logistics of Dickens obtaining the original manuscript from Mathew, including evidence of direct correspondence between the two men, and Mathew‟s personal friendship with Oliver Wendell Holmes at the time that Dickens visited America (Holmes was instrumental in inviting Dickens); I found clear precursor works written by both Mathew, and his first wife, Abby (a literary prodigy, like Mathew); and I eventually found two strong pieces of evidence by studying Dickens‟ handwritten draft, in comparison with the published text. It appears that Dickens—a secularist with no respect for Spiritualism—had copied the work of a deeply religious and spiritual author (or authors), secularizing it or toning it down where the spiritual references were too blatant.

    But who knows, perhaps Dickens was a reincarnation of Plato? And if the same souls, for the most part, as you suggest, populate our modern cities as they did in past cities, Dickens and Plato, and Socrates may still be with us, as also a multitude of others. Following the same life patters, as you also suggest, these past city dwellers should be easily found among us modern souls, and within the same group of friends?

    PHAEDRUS: What an incomprehensible being you are, Socrates: when you
    are in the country, as you say, you really are like some stranger who is led about
    by a guide. Do you ever cross the border? I rather think that you never venture
    even outside the gates.
    SOCRATES: Very true, my good friend; and I hope that you will excuse me
    when you hear the reason, which is, that I am a lover of knowledge, and the
    men who dwell in the city are my teachers
    , and not the trees or the country.

    Though I do indeed believe that you have found a spell with which to draw me
    out of the city into the country, like a hungry cow before whom a bough or a
    bunch of fruit is waved. For only hold up before me in like manner a book, and
    you may lead me all round Attica, and over the wide world.
    And now having
    arrived, I intend to lie down, and do you choose any posture in which you can
    read best. Begin.

    Living for the city?



     
  17. Jaimie

    Jaimie Senior Member

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    I don't mean to step on anyone's toes here but has it not in all times been known for new generations to come up with "their own" stories that when you look back the movie has already been made by a then forgotten time, generation. Could this not be the same ? It does not mean the new generation's story is less authentic or has knowingly plagiarized the past's story.

    /Jaimie
     
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  18. Native Son

    Native Son Senior Member

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    Ouch! Watch were you are stepping.

    I think you may be right about what has been will be again. But then, one is apt to think that you are plagiarizing too! But, in my opinion, it has to be asked, have we not all been here before, and will be again, and again, and again,......and again? Is there anything new under the sun? We may all be plagiarists, except for ONE, the One and only First, God?

    Ecclesiastes 1:
    8All things are wearisome, more than one can describe; the eye is not satisfied with seeing, nor the ear content with hearing. 9What has been is what will be, and what has been done will be done again; there is nothing new under the sun. 10Is there a case where one can say, “Look, this is new”? It has already existed in the ages before us.…
     
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  19. 4d4m

    4d4m Active Member

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    Maybe, or maybe Dicken's was watching what was happening in London and Paris at the time and wrote a story about it. It just so happens it is reminiscent of things that happened between two cities in the past that were witnessed and reported on by other writers.
     
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  20. Jaimie

    Jaimie Senior Member

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    Good work with the paper, it took me some time to get through it honestly but that's the thing with papers/reports, isn't it ? Anyway, thanks for helping to spread the reincarnation-word :)
     
  21. Native Son

    Native Son Senior Member

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    In my opinion, Dickens was a master at observing and also reading other previous great authors from many fields of expertise, to then adapt his observations from actual physical conditions as well as literature to his novels. If that is plagiarism, then we are all plagiarists, as I hinted before to Jaimie.
     
  22. Native Son

    Native Son Senior Member

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    I'm playing the devil's advocate again. And I'm throwing this out at large, aiming at all those who are determined to show to the skeptical world the scientific proof for reincarnation. Specifically, I'm aiming at those who also claim to have direct and frequent contact with spiritual guides. Also, in the neighborhood of these, there are those that have clear and firm memory of being in the astral world in-between lives. And this is what I'm throwing out. What better proof of reincarnation could be given to the skeptical world other than that old fashion, true and tried, future prophecy? Why, what else but new fashion future prophecy! Which would be a combination of specific, short range, future events that will occur, along with wonderful documentaries full of logical and eloquent treatises on the evidence of the afterlife. Those that have access to communications with spiritual beings, and also possess the abilities/talents to produce documentaries, are the best candidates to provide scientific proof for reincarnation. Remembering that the scientific skeptical community considers science that which can predict events, using absolute physical laws expressed mathematically.

    Here are a couple of examples of the quest to convince the world, and both come from http://www.victorzammit.com/archives/2020/January3rd2020.htm

    ONE OF THE GREATEST SOURCES OF INFORMATION
    [​IMG]
    ABOUT THE AFTERLIFE

    Silver Birch was a spirit teacher who spoke through Maurice Barbanell (1902-1981), founder and editor of the Psychic News of London, England. He was one of the influential spiritual commentators of the mid-20th Century who drew our attention to the coming of a miraculous “New World".

    Silver Birch was not himself an American Indian. He was too far removed from the Earth to communicate directly, so he used a North American Indian in the astral world to relay his messages to Maurice Barbanell. He received his information from a collective of higher spirits. As he put it: “There is a vast concourse, all with wills perfectly attuned, with minds in harmony, with souls all at one. They use me, even as I use this instrument, to tell your world the truths that have been buried for too long but which are now being restored and given their rightful place in the lives of thousands of men and women." Read more about who Silver Birch is.


    CLASSIC RESEARCH RE-PRESENTED FOR A MODERN AUDIENCE Keith Parsons is a retired radio current
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    affairs producer who spent many years with BBC World Service, London, often traveling the world while making documentaries on international politics and economics. In 2008, when he became annoyed about the skeptical bias in TV documentaries about the afterlife, he decided to use his professional skills to do something about it. Since then, he has created 30 wonderful documentaries on evidence for the afterlife. Treating each topic from the point of view of an investigative reporter, he argues logically and eloquently for the evidence to be taken seriously.
    Read Mike Tymn's excellent interview with Keith.
     
  23. Blazealiste

    Blazealiste Senior Member

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    Great work, your articles are very interesting to read. Good job!
     
  24. Native Son

    Native Son Senior Member

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    With this pandemic of the corona virus, and the havoc it is producing in the entire world, it was a missed opportunity for those that are out to scientifically prove reincarnation, and who claim to have direct access to the astral realm. Especially those that claim to have a specific mission assigned to them directly from the astral high counsel, to prove to us here on earth, that reincarnation is a universal truth.

    What I mean is this. If, say last summer, they were to have come out with a scientific paper, or a video, and predicted what is now happening in the world, as a result of the corona virus, thereby clearly stating that the specific information on specific events, such as the US government issuing checks to all Americans in the amount of a thousand dollars, or thereabouts, and that this info had came directly from the astral world, there would be now a great number of less skeptics in the world, and this would have been a show of a mission well accomplished.
     
    SeekerOfKnowledge likes this.
  25. Speedwell

    Speedwell Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    I'm not at all certain what any of this has to do with reincarnation. Your question really comes in the same category as asking, "Why, if you can predict the future, have you not won the lottery?" or a whole similar set of questions.

    Personally, I'm not buying your argument, and even less do I accept that this has anything whatsoever to do with reincarnation. Sorry.
     
  26. Li-la

    Li-la Senior Member

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    Diseases that spread like these has happened in all time of ages, it is nothing new. The new we are spoiled in the western world to think nothing like this will happen to us. Well, now it has happened. All we can do is make the best of it.

    I can agree to that people able to see in to the future could have come forward to tell the tale, but not everyone who remembers having past life is able to see the future, and perhaps it is so that those who can see the future has not been allowed to see this coming.

    Best Wishes
    Li La
     
  27. ssake

    ssake Senior Registered

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    Dickens appears to have been a worldly man who had no use for Spiritualism. He did delve into hypnosis, apparently as a power trip. Abby Poyen Whittier, who was responsible for all the spiritual elements of "A Christmas Carol," very likely was familiar with NDE's. Mathew, her husband, the other original co-author, wrote about an NDE in a children's book he published in 1863.
     
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