Greek lives and connections

Discussion in 'Past Life Memories' started by mertzie, Nov 4, 2007.

  1. mertzie

    mertzie Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2003
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    north of Seattle
    Hello Everyone - I am wondering about your lives in Greece, preferably ancient Greece. I have a strong affinity for ancient Greece with no specific memories. I love the tradition of the Pythia (Oracle) in Delphi and am constantly drawn to the land, sea, and architecture of ancient Greece. I have been told by a reliable psychic that, as a Greek, I was a Roman gladiator (slave), and that I also had a more recent lifetime when my parents were Christian missionaries to Greece. I went along, only to fall in love with the culture and marry a Greek and tried to fit in, blue eyes, blonde hair and all.

    What are your feelings and memories? Thanks -:)
     
  2. Karoliina

    Karoliina Moderator Emerita

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2005
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Finland, Europe
    Hello Mary,


    It's always nice to see your post here. :)


    I don't have specific memories of Greece myself, and I find it actually a little weird there seem to be very few of them in general thinking about posts and threads on this forum at least. :confused: After all Greece has a very colourful and well-known history that has influenced Western societies a great deal, so you'd think the memories would be in a relatively easy reach.


    Have you read about this Greek PL experience of Eevee's? I think it's fascinating-


    Karoliina
     
  3. Sunniva

    Sunniva Administrator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2005
    Messages:
    0
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Copenhagen, Denmark, Europe
    Hi,


    I have memories of ancient Greece too :) I'm very drawn to the country, the climate and the landscape, especially the early times, like Minoan culture.


    In a regression I saw myself as a young girl aged 17 or 18. I lived with my family, we weren't rich, but had no needs, were well-nutritioned. It was a very happy life, I had a loving family with a wonderful spirit. I had no cares, and although life was hard at times, it didn't seem to bother us. I believe I was free to marry whom I wanted (it was a small community so there probably weren't that many to chose from anyway) and I was happy.


    During the regression I got the name Andra - it could be a nickname, but I think it was my name. I also got the place name Miros. I couldn't find Miros during research afterwards, but I did find a place called Milos - a Greek island in the cyclades, which matched exactly with the landscape I had seen.


    I haven't had that many memories of this life though - all the above came during only one regression, but I feel a great longing for Greece and for my island :)
     
  4. mertzie

    mertzie Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2003
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    north of Seattle
    I remembered one!


    Karoliina - Thanks you for your kind welcome! :) I did read Evee's PL memory of Greece! Thanks for including the link. It was fascinating, and it was not hard to imagine that a life during Greece's Golden Age, if you had status and wealth, was a lovely thing!


    Sunniva - Thank you for recounting the details your regression to what-sounds-like another happy Greek lifetime. If you were born at the right time, in the right place, you did not have to be high born to have a wonderful life. I, too, am drawn to Minoan culture, but I just think that is one of many places I have inhabited in that region because my soul was drawn there again and again.


    Last night I spontaneously recalled a Greek lifetime that was very important to my healing. I hardly ever remember a past life consciously. I usually learn of them through dreams and regression - and sometimes through a psychic friend. But last night I learned so much. I saw myself as a man, a soldier who was well-off, so I must have been of high rank. I lived in a stone house with a small balconey that overlooked the Aegean. I was married to a woman I loved so much it was unbelievable - just unbelievable. I felt his love for her, and it was absolutely overwhelming.


    However, she was pretty much a slave to him, which was normal for women in those times. She was subject to his every whim but loved him. Still, "I" - the man - was crass and bold and loved having possession of her. He was a great lover, though, which made me proud of him - ha! ;)


    At some point, and I am not sure of the time frame, although I heard "Peloponnesian Wars," an earthquake occurred, and the wife was buried alive. All of the light went out of him then, and this was the part of me that needed healing. I cried and cried for him and feel that a grief has been lifted. There was an earthquake that sparked a revolt then, but the area was much more prone to horrible quakes about 1500 years earlier. I really don't what the timeframe was, but it was ancient Greece, and I now feel I have closure on that lifetime.


    Thanks for listening, and if anyone else has a Greek memory, please share! :thumbsup:
     
  5. Sunniva

    Sunniva Administrator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2005
    Messages:
    0
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Copenhagen, Denmark, Europe
    Thank you for sharing that, Mertzie! :thumbsup: I have yet to experience such a catharsis like that. I'm sure it's very powerfull.


    I wanted to let you that you shouldn't feel bad about how you treated your wife (if you do;)). I had flashlike realization a few nights ago when I was reading about the political organisation of Ancient Greece. I suddenly thought: "Don't feel the unfairness of the system through your modern self, we didn't find it unfair, we didn't really care, it didn't really matter as long as we were free."


    My point is, that through modern eyes you may feel you treated your wife badly, though through ancient greek eyes, if would have been the norm. She had seen her grandmother, her mother, her sisters, friends - all the other women she knew of alive as well in myths - treated in the same way. She didn't consider it bad, it was the way it was, she knew nothing else.


    ;)
     
  6. mertzie

    mertzie Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2003
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    north of Seattle
    Thank you


    Sunniva - Thank you for saying that. While I feel that my dominance created karma in that life with that beautiful soul who was my wife, I did not know I was doing anything wrong, and, in that culture, as you point out, that kind of male dominance wasn't considered wrong. Still, it was. Yet, the enormous love came through stronger than anything, and that is what I needed to see.


    Peace and God bless -- :thumbsup:
     
  7. Sunniva

    Sunniva Administrator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2005
    Messages:
    0
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Copenhagen, Denmark, Europe
    The most important thing is that you learned something from it and feel it changed something in you :thumbsup:


    Bless you too :)
     
  8. Eevee

    Eevee Administrator Emeritus Staff Member Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2001
    Messages:
    0
    Likes Received:
    25
    Location:
    Belgium
    Hi Mertzie,


    I also realize that we shouldn't judge situations in such an ancient life and such a different culture by our Western standards.


    I was, in my Greek life, very happy that I was to live in their house, where I would have my husbands sister for company. Although I loved him very much and was proud to be his bride, and he loved me, I also knew he would occasionally spend the night with other girls - after a banquet the girls that were brought for entertainment, also entertained the men in bed....It was normal, and a man was not expected to always refuse the girls.


    Also, I know I had a daughter in that life, and I loved my baby very much,but....according to standards, I could not raise her myself, she was taken away early and a nourishing woman (don't know the term in english) took care of her; later, when she didn't need breastfeeding any more, some other slaves became her teachers and pedagoges. I had little to do with her upbringing. To think about that, saddens me in my current life, but it was just how it was done in those days, and I accepted it without questioning.


    Eevee
     
  9. Laurasia

    Laurasia Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2007
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    United States
    Hi Mertzie.


    I have recalled 2 lifetimes in ancient Greece. In both I was a male soldier. I believe one lifetime to be during Alexander the Greats' campaigns & the other to be during the Trojan War. (I know that some may have trouble with that statement, since the Trojan War is not "fact", but that is what I have recalled.)


    Sincerely,


    Laurasia
     
  10. mertzie

    mertzie Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2003
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    north of Seattle
    Great stuff


    Thanks, Eevee and Laurasia, for your posts. As far as I'm concerned, the Trojan War happened!! And I'm one of those people who couldn't stand "The 300" for its egregious historical inaccuracies. I'm a stickler for what really happened, and I think that horse existed! :) Laurasia - would love to hear the details of your lives!


    Anyway, Eevee, wonderful details - thank you. I think I have forgiven myself for that lifetime and do understand the cultural differences. When I was remembering last night, I knew - in spite of how profoundly he loved his wife - the man I was had been with many other women! It's funny you bring that up! It was just part of being a man in my time and of my rank: I felt entitled, it was normal, and it fed my ego. That doesn't make it right. The thing that bothered me about the relationship with the wife was that the dominance and slapping around was wrong even though it was culturally accepted. It, no doubt, hurt her, saddened her, and I wasn't sensitive enough then to realize it.


    It's like you and nurturing your own children in that life: Of course, it is right for a mother to love and raise her own children if she is able, and wrong if she and the children are denied this, even if the culture dictates. People who have bucked the culture, who instinctively had the guts and knowing not to follow laws and mores that ran counter to love were, no doubt, courageous and perhaps advanced souls then. I would hope now that I wouldn't treat my precious wife that way.


    Thanks so much for your input. :thumbsup:
     
  11. Aaron

    Aaron Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2003
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    1
    Hi Mertzie! Nice to see you around as usual, we have to do lunch again sometime! ;)


    Most Greeks I see nowdays have dark eyes and dark hair, I wonder why that is? Was it different back then? That's something I want to look into.


    BTW 300 wasn't made for historical purposes, it's just a bunch of eye candy in my opinion LOL.


    OK so I can be not much more of a nuisance here and be on topic , I would like to say that I have had strong feelings of ancient Greece myself. I have been told by a few people that they have seen me as someone of that era (but of course we can never rely on other people telling us of their impressions, because it's only their perception).


    It's something about the designs of everything from buildings to clothing to ships of that era that bring about a sense of excitement inside. Perhaps someday I will figure it out.


    Ciao,


    Aaron
     
  12. Laurasia

    Laurasia Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2007
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    United States
    Some day, when I'm not at work ;) , I'll be sure to share some of my past incarnations on the site.


    Sincerely,


    Laurasia
     
  13. mertzie

    mertzie Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2003
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    north of Seattle
    Hi Aaron!


    Lovely to hear from you! -- I'm sure you were around at least once in ancient Greek times. Yes, apparently the predominant eye color and hair color are dark for Greeks, but given the infiltration of other cultures over the millenia I'm sure it's changed. In my memory the other night, the man and woman were both dark, although her complexion was lighter - he was very "300"-like ;) . I realize the aimed-for demographic of that movie was teenaged boys, but - still - for those of us who respect the history - OMG :eek: .
     
  14. Sunniva

    Sunniva Administrator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2005
    Messages:
    0
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Copenhagen, Denmark, Europe
    I also remember mysef as oliveskinned with black hair and brown eyes. I think the genetic reason for that is just diversity of cultures living in that area. The Greek gene pool would include Etruscans, Phoenicians, Africans, Arabs etc. etc.


    :)
     

Share This Page