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Growing up, did you have an affinity for another country or culture?

AstonishingPatch123

Senior Member
As you know, a tell-tale sign that you have been reincarnated is if you’ve got an affinity for another country or culture.

My family are Irish, and I have lived in Ireland my whole life, and none of us has ever lived in England. However, growing up, I had a strong affinity for England. I was a full-on Anglophile and I didn’t know it. In fact, I thought I was English until I was about 7. It was then that I realised I was actually Irish. However, I genuinely felt as if I was in Great Britain up until my mid-teenage years. I spoke in a strong English accent when I was younger (my mother says it was my autism, but it could’ve been a mix of that and the past lives I lived), which at one point resembled a Staffordshire accent, so I believe that in my final past life I lived in Staffordshire. I didn’t live to be an adult in my final two past lives. In my final past life, I died at the age of just 11 in 2004 and in the life before that, I died at the age of 16 in 1993.

I’ve always had an affinity for England, and when I became interested in reincarnation, I discovered that I had indeed been English in several past lives.

Did you have an affinity for another culture growing up?
 

AstonishingPatch123

Senior Member
Some of my memories I gained when I was younger included walking down Westminster on a wet day in the mid 1980s. I had never seen Downing Street and I hadn’t really heard the name London except for here and there.
 

Totoro

Super Moderator
Staff member
Super Moderator
I had a very strong affinity for early 1900's China and also any thing from England.

When I was a kid I was obsessed with kung fu movies. While I loved the martial arts, they all took place in late 19th and early 20th century China. The clothes and building of the era looked very familiar to me and I found watching them to be very comforting.

After doing a lot of research, it turned out I lived in the first half of the 20th century in China. Many of the people that were in China at that time were from the UK and I could speak and read and write English. My whole life now, I've used the UK spellings of words and even used 7 with the crosshatch and I've really enjoyed BBC shows.
 

Cyrus

Senior Registered
Hi, everybody.

Very early I discovered an affinity with Italy, and later on, also with Greece.
I never liked Spanish landscapes as the Italian and Greek, and Spanish music as the Italian and Greek.
In Spain, cypress is considered a tree of Death, and therefore you can only see cypresses here in the cemeteries.

IMHO.

Best regards.

P.S.
My Spanish teacher of Greek:
 
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Klaud

Senior Member
Not so much an affinity, but I very clearly remember trying to convince my mother that I was Italian when I was little. We are not Italian, but that was the best my kid brain could come up when trying to describe 'Roman'.
 

Cyrus

Senior Registered
Not so much an affinity, but I very clearly remember trying to convince my mother that I was Italian when I was little. We are not Italian, but that was the best my kid brain could come up when trying to describe 'Roman'.
The Ancient Romans never considered Italy as something homogeneous.
There was nothing like "populus italicus" in Latin, only "populus romanus".

The term "italicus" referred only to those who were from the tribes like Ossi, Umbri, and some others and who spoke languages similar to Latin, the language of the tribe Latini, that polulated the region Latium (called nowadays Lazio), including the city of Rome.
Italy, for the most part, was populated in the antiquity by many other nations that spoke languages that had nothing to do with Latin, and some of which weren't even Arian, like e.g. the Etrusci (or Tusci, as the Romans called them), that populated the region called nowadays Tuscany. The southern part of Italy (including the city of Naples) was populated by the Greeks, which, though Arians, spoke a languge very different from Latin.

I was a Tuscan in my PL, and I often felt kind of a slight hostility towards Lazio and Rome, in my regressions and déjà-vus, during my PL travels in Southern Tuscany, as a young man.

IMHO.
 
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Klaud

Senior Member
The Ancient Romans never considered Italy as something homogeneous.
There was nothing like "populus italicus" in Latin, only "populus romanus".

IMHO.
Italy as we know it didn't formally exist until 1861, well after the fall of Rome, but all I knew at that age was enough to connect the Rome I remembered to modern Italy.
 

Cyrus

Senior Registered
Italy as we know it didn't formally exist until 1861, well after the fall of Rome, but all I knew at that age was enough to connect the Rome I remembered to modern Italy.
Historically, the name Italy existed since approx. 7-th century B.C. - it was the name given by the Greek colonists to the whole peninsula. This name meant something like "the country of the calves" (vitello - veal).

In 1861 Italy (except Lazio and Rome !) was united into a single state under the rule of Victor Emmanuel II, the former King of Sardinia-Piedmont.
Its capital became Florence (the former capital of Tuscany !). Lazio and Rome joined the united Italy only after 1870, when the Prussian troops defeated Napoleon III - a great defender of the Pope, that was against the united Italy.

The Tuscan (not Roman !) dialect (one of the 16 dialects in Italy at that moment) was chosen as the official Italian language.

IMHO
 
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GalaxyDreamer90

Senior Member
As you know, a tell-tale sign that you have been reincarnated is if you’ve got an affinity for another country or culture.

My family are Irish, and I have lived in Ireland my whole life, and none of us has ever lived in England. However, growing up, I had a strong affinity for England. I was a full-on Anglophile and I didn’t know it. In fact, I thought I was English until I was about 7. It was then that I realised I was actually Irish. However, I genuinely felt as if I was in Great Britain up until my mid-teenage years. I spoke in a strong English accent when I was younger (my mother says it was my autism, but it could’ve been a mix of that and the past lives I lived), which at one point resembled a Staffordshire accent, so I believe that in my final past life I lived in Staffordshire. I didn’t live to be an adult in my final two past lives. In my final past life, I died at the age of just 11 in 2004 and in the life before that, I died at the age of 16 in 1993.

I’ve always had an affinity for England, and when I became interested in reincarnation, I discovered that I had indeed been English in several past lives.

Did you have an affinity for another culture growing up?
Hi though I'm American I am mostly of British decent and if I remember my history right Ireland was once considered part of the UK to this day northern Ireland is still part of the UK. Though Ireland and the UK are different countries I consider Ireland part of the UK even though it really isn't.
 

CodeNevermind

Active Member
Brazil, but I didn't know it because I didn't feel any connection to inaccurate/stereotypical portrayals of the culture in media. Growing up I had a pretty crystal-clear image of the kind of environment that felt familiar to me, but I just couldn't figure out where it was. I thought it was somewhere in the USA for a long time, but no place felt "right". It was somewhere warm, humid, urban...LA wasn't right. The kind of natural landscapes in California didn't seem familiar. NYC, maybe? Distantly, yes, but not enough nature. And just a bit too big. And not enough brutalist architecture. Florida came close, but again, it felt too "near the equator". Some places in Southeast Asia looked more "close", but not quite, it felt like an amorphous blend of Southeast Asia, Africa, the USA, and old Soviet countries. I figured it had to be somewhere in Latin America, then.

I kept digging through different styles of traditional/folk music (and some rock/pop) from all over Latin America, found a lot of music I enjoyed- then I hit bossa nova and something clicked. That struck a chord with me. Rock from Brazil in the 70s-80s also just sounded "right". It's not that it was "better" or something, it just sounded right. "That's my music". I looked at photos of Brazil in the 80s and it was like I was on the verge of some amazing breakthrough, finally I saw São Paulo and almost cried. Astrologically, it turns out I have some pretty intense south node and Pluto connections to that city.

Brazilian Portuguese rolls off my tongue so naturally, it feels like a warm blanket, like a fish in water, feels almost good to speak it. I've tried my hand at a couple of languages but none ever felt this comfortable! Not even the languages spoken in my family ever felt this familiar and natural. It's like there was "muscle memory" or something. Have also always gotten along pretty well with Brazilians just by coincidence. How ironic that I'm now ethnically the "rival" of Brazil. I suppose it makes sense I'd have some cultural things in common with them given the proximity, but the smallest details make the biggest difference. It's changed a lot nowadays. Time is cruel, but I can listen to Raul Seixas whenever I want, haha.
 

GalaxyDreamer90

Senior Member
Lately I've been getting more and more into Japanese culture especially since I hate what my country the US is becoming these days. I don't think Japan is perfect but somehow their culture just seems so much better then then the culture here in my country. For example the Japanese are more family oriented and it isn't uncommon for kids to still live with their parents in middle age to help take care of their parents while here in my culture it is frowned apon to still live with your parents in your 30s and there is a lot of pressure for young adults to move out on their own. However I know from experience that with the way the economy is it is practically impossible to get a job and move out on your own as a young adult. That's why I just got a job and moved out a couple of years ago at the age of 30. Of course it didn't help that when I was in my 20s the country was going through a recession and still is.
 

Erica

Active Member
I’ve always felt familiar and comfortable with various aspects of German culture, places, food, clothing, music and speech, even before I was old enough to recognize them as being German. For instance, if I heard someone speak with a German accent, I didn’t think they really sounded different or strange, but just normal and often even easier to understand than some American accents. When I was little I also very easily spoke with a British accent and felt very drawn to English culture (and still am today), yet there are also things about it which can really seem to clash with my own traits, preferences and personality.
 

JoysInSight

New Member
Ever since I was about 8 years old, I've always loved pretty much anything and everything Japanese. This despite my father's hatred for the Japanese because of the atrocities committed by the Japanese during World War II, when my father was very young. On the other hand, I have an inexplicable affinity for the Japanese. One of my favorite TV shows is "Midnight Diner" on Netflix. Anytime I want to relax, I watch and rewatch Midnight Diner. I also read books on the Japanese and their culture. If in fact I was Japanese in a previous life, I'd be very proud.
 

Cyrus

Senior Registered
..............................................
Brazilian Portuguese rolls off my tongue so naturally, it feels like a warm blanket, like a fish in water, feels almost good to speak it. I've tried my hand at a couple of languages but none ever felt this comfortable! Not even the languages spoken in my family ever felt this familiar and natural. It's like there was "muscle memory" or something. Have also always gotten along pretty well with Brazilians just by coincidence. How ironic that I'm now ethnically the "rival" of Brazil. I suppose it makes sense I'd have some cultural things in common with them given the proximity, but the smallest details make the biggest difference. It's changed a lot nowadays. Time is cruel, but I can listen to Raul Seixas whenever I want, haha.

What a wonderful story!
Brazil is a good (not the best, though) choice for a new reincarnation.

Cariocan dialect of Brazilian Portuguese rolls off my tongue naturally, too, though I'm sure none of my PLs took place in Brazil.
I just learnt it from a group of ethnical Germans from Rio.

N.B. Carioca is a small region around Rio de Janeiro, and the Brazilians from Sao Paulo say my way of speaking 'seca a boca' [=turns one's mouth dry].
Cariocan dialect is very close to the European Portuguese, unlike the medieval Portuguese of the rest of Brazil, which is very like Spanish...

Best Regards.

IMHO.
 
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