How do the various religions of the world view reincarnation?

Discussion in 'Reincarnation, Religion and Spirituality' started by Deborah, Apr 5, 2003.

  1. SeaAndSky

    SeaAndSky Senior Registered

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    Hi Rod,

    I agree that it is a great book and also that there will be an eventual rise from the ashes, but the rise is of something different and not always better. But, life goes on. Though I may mourn, I will also try to adapt. In this regard, I'm glad that you remember "Alas, Babylon" as it tells of such a time following a nuclear war.

    The scenarios in Florida have changed, and the country itself is not as strong and united as it was at the time the book was written, but I have always taken to heart several incidents that occurred. Among the characters introduced at the beginning of the book was a flamboyant lady (wealthy northern money type) who moved into the small central Florida town where the book is set and a rather plain, stocky old-maid type who took great pride in her fancy aquarium. The protagonists were an ex-military officer and his girlfriend. In any case, it doesn't take too long after electric power is lost for all the fancy beautifully colored tropical fish in the aquarium to die, only the plain ordinary guppies and the tough catfish types survive. At about the same time the flamboyant lady, a diabetic who is unable to get insulin, also dies. The lesson taken from this is that a disaster of this type will be the end of all the fancy and flamboyant types and ways, at least until things build back up again. The survivors will be the ordinary types (plain, hard-working old maid) and the tough strong types (e.g., the protagonists).

    What this generally comes down to is those who work the soil or work with their hands (peasants and artisans) plus warriors. If history is any guide, this ends in some type of sheep/wolf feudalism where the former supports the latter and the latter become "sheepdogs" and provide protection from "wolves". It's better than complete chaos, but is certainly no paradise. In the book things work out a little bit better as the sheepdogs are actually pretty civilized, and there is still some remnant of the U.S. government in existence. However, that is a fairly optimistic approach to things that can, and given the direction of the country over the past couple of generations, probably would end up much worse.

    Cordially,
    S&S
     
  2. SeaAndSky

    SeaAndSky Senior Registered

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    Hmmm. Another simplifying feature of the story was that the cities and their surrounding suburbs were pretty well eliminated. Hence, it was only a question of how those left untouched in the deep country areas would survive. In real life, barring such complete decimation, the huge numbers in and around metropolitan areas would be flooding out into the country as best they could in search of food, etc. The final results might well be even grimmer than spelled out in "Alas, Babylon"--i.e., mutual starvation, etc. Well, I hope it doesn't come down to that. We've probably all "been there and done that" at one point or another in the past as well. It is certainly not something to be sought.
     
  3. SeaAndSky

    SeaAndSky Senior Registered

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    BTW--I continue to read up on Odinism as I have time. Some of it is pretty "intense"--but mostly not beyond what I would expect from Northern Heathen sources. The ancient Scandinavians, Anglo-Saxons and other ancient followers of Odin/Wotan--the first two constituting a majority of my physical ancestors--were not, after all, pansies. But overall, for me, a somewhat mixed bag given the anti-Christian animus. However, it is refreshingly different from the "airy fairy" wispiness of most modern attempts to recreate pagan religions, and a world away from the great McDonalds of Magick, Wicca and its followers. I loved the remarks I saw somewhere by Heathens that Wiccans were tree huggers, while Heathens cut down trees to make long boats, etc. :D I assume that also included forging swords and warming the hearth. So, a definite culture shift. I also appreciate the focus on family, morality, self-reliance etc. in most sources. In any case--

    Curiosity question #1: What do you think of the Odin Brotherhood, which represents itself as a secret society surviving from pre-Christian times? Curiosity question #2: What approach does your group have to reincarnation? You've mentioned it, but I haven't read anything definite spelling it out.
     

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