I always thought my son was "strange".

Discussion in 'Children's Past Lives -Age 7 & under' started by jen21, Oct 3, 2010.

  1. jen21

    jen21 New Member

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    My son is now 6 and I have always thought he was a little strange...I think I know why now.
    About a month ago we were having breakfast and out of nowhere he told me,"You know mom, I was an adult before". I wasn't too sure how to react so I chose to let him think that what he had told me was something absolutely normal. Bells started ringing in my head though!
    Yesterday I decide to ask him about what he had told me last month and he remembered and then proceeded to tell me that he thinks this is third time and that he thinks that he has died of a gunshot. In his 6 year old words he asked me," when people die, do they grow smaller and go into a baby? Is that how it works?"

    This morning we were talking about cats (he wants another kitten) I briefly explained animal over population and he said..."They give them a needle to fall asleep and go to heaven...Too bad they don't do that for us. They just let us suffer". he was slightly angry when he said this and I have never spoken of euthanasia with or around him.

    At the age of 4 I had brought him to the park and he had stopped playing and just sat alone away from everyone. My mother asked him if he was all right and he answered,"You're disturbing me. Don't you know I'm thinking? I have to write my book".

    I find it also very strange how he's oddly comfortable with adults and has always spoken to them as their equal. He can play very well with kids but seems to enjoy conversing with adults often more interesting.

    His teachers and daycare workers all describe him as an adult stuck in a childs body.
    Can it be?

    Jennifer
     
  2. ChrisR

    ChrisR Administrator Emeritus Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Hi Jennifer, welcome to the forum :)


    It sounds like your son could be remembering a past life (or lives) It's not uncommon for a child of his age to remember, except a child will often not be so direct and relate what he or she remembers from the past, with something that they recognize in their present life, leading the parent to believe that they have an over active imagination.


    So there is really nothing to worry about. He doesn't seem to be traumatized in any way with his memories, and usually a child will start to forget about the past when they become more involved in what is going on in their present life.


    If you are curious to find out more, then you could always start a journal and write down everything 'unusual' that he talks about. Gently probe him, but don't push for answers. Just ask simple questions like what his name was? how old was he when he was shot? did he have any friends? what did his clothes look like? and then don't over react at his answers, just go with the flow and let him open up.


    Have you read Carol's book: Children's Past Lives: How Past Life Memories Affect Your Child There's plenty of advice and information in there to show you that birth, death and rebirth is a perfectly natural process that we all experience. Let us know how you get on.


    Chris :)
     
  3. Tinkerman

    Tinkerman Administrator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Hi Jennifer, sure... it can be. It is not at all uncommon, as Chris said, for children this age to verbalize past life memories. This what our forum's founder Carol Bowman specializes in. I too highly encourage you to read her book.


    Thanks for joining us here...and welcome!!


    Tinkerman
     
  4. Nightrain

    Nightrain Senior Registered

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    Interesting but, of course, not strange. How remarkable it is to have such a child – such an opportunity for you! I was especially taken with the "Don't you know I'm thinking?" remark!


    I wish that I had the presence of mind to say that to my own father in years past. He never liked to see me being physically idle. Parents are so much more sensitive to the cognitive needs of children these days.


    We so often suggest to parents that they keep a journal of all that their children say and do. But, encouraging your son to keep a journal about his private reflections and questions might be very constructive for him. If he is inclined to write, as he has mentioned, you may have a budding philosopher in your family.
     
  5. jen21

    jen21 New Member

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    PS: forgot to mention


    I forgot to mention in my original post that when my son told me he was shot, he also said,"You know the war, the first war, when all the girls went to the city?" So I asked him, " what did the girls do in the city?" his response was, "they went to do the guys' jobs because they were gone." He also told me later on in the day that he thinks he was 14 yrs old and they wouldn't let him join.


    Does anyone know what age was required to join the military during the first world war?


    My son keeps telling me he wants to be a soldier when he grows up and he has such an interest for guns, it sometimes makes me uneasy.


    Jennifer
     
  6. ChrisR

    ChrisR Administrator Emeritus Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Hi Jennifer, thanks for the update :)


    The age of conscription during WW1 was between the ages of 18 and 41, I don't know if these ages applied to volunteers, but 14 seems to be well below an acceptable age either way, so your son was most likely correct in that respect.


    I wouldn't worry too much about his interest in guns at this stage. His fascination will be coming from a more nostalgic perspective rather than anything sinister. I would expect him to lose interest as he gets older and other things begin to occupy his mind :)
     
  7. Hannah

    Hannah New Member

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    I suspect that he's referring to WWII because the "Rosie the Riveter" mass movement of women into the work force did not happen in WWI. When he says "the first war" he may be taking Korea, Vietnam, or the Gulf War into the equation.
     
  8. cecily

    cecily Senior Registered

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    WWI is possible in UK


    If your son's life during "the first war" occurred in the UK, it's possible he was talking about World War I. After a labor shortage resulted from men going into the army, women were allowed into jobs such as driving and conducting on London buses and the Underground. Factory jobs were suddenly open to women at levels which had been reserved for men before the war. One reason British women received suffrage soon after the war ended because their work in formerly male jobs was held to have earned it.


    And yes, girls and women did move to towns to take advantage of the new opportunities.
     
  9. vicky

    vicky Senior Member

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    My great uncle entered the British military when he was 16 during WWI.
     
  10. hydrolad

    hydrolad Senior Moderator Super Moderator

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    Wow, 16 years of age?


    I remember looking at a book on WWII and thinking how mature the young soldiers looked (uniforms notwithstanding); so serious, stoic and stern, at being thrust into a situation so early in their life!


    And so many young people (on all sides) died during WWII, in these tumultuous times in our history!


    And without going into a rant about "young people nowadays" and sounding like I'm ancient (but I am much too close to ancient!) :)


    But in retrospect, I've noticed a trend towards youthfulness in our population lately, that may or may not somehow tie in with Reincarnation?


    I've been postulating some personal beliefs that acting/believing/looking so young nowadays may very well be a mis-guided defense at dying much too soon in this life!


    And acting/believing/looking so young may very well be a rebellion or a rage against dying so young as Dylan Thomas wrote in a poem “Rage, Rage against the Dying of the Light”


    Now I realize that a persons death (passing into spirit) is worked out beforehand, by our Spirit Guides and Teachers before we are born, enough that we may not have much say in the matter (short of Exit Points or worse, Suicide).


    Any thoughts on this anyone?
     
  11. Val

    Val Member

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    I too, have noticed a trend toward youthfulness today, but I have thought it may be related to the fact that the average lifespan of humans (in developed countries anyway) seem to be getting longer.


    Back in the thirties, for example, a forty-something woman would be thought of as a granny, and she would generally look and act like a granny. Now forty-something seems to be considered early middle-age. We look at older women like Cher and Madonna, who with the help of modern science and technology look up to twenty years younger then they are, and we tend to think of their true age as not that old anymore.


    Another thing that comes to mind while considering this subject is a verse in the new Scorpions song that says, "How can we grow old when the sound track of our lives is rock-n-roll?" So maybe frame of mind also has something to do with the aging process.
     
  12. hydrolad

    hydrolad Senior Moderator Super Moderator

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    In retrospect Val, I think you may have the answer.


    When I was growing up in the 50's, my 60 something year old Grand-Mother looked like a Grand-Mother and she was proud of it.


    Nowadays 70 year olds are trying to look 40 something.


    Where will it all end; as for me, I really don't care anymore, I was never much to look at to begin with, and now I'm certainly not. :laugh:
     
  13. tanguerra

    tanguerra Moderator Emeritus

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    I think it has more to do with better food, better health care, fewer children, and easier work. Skin cosmetics also help of course. In less wealthy countries people can look much older than westeners of the same age because life is just harder. How soon we forget!
     
  14. Val

    Val Member

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    You are right, but I believe that frame of mind, and genetics plays in also because I have seen people from the same social-economic background and the same age yet some look much older or younger than the others. Generally the older looking ones seem to be more negative thinking people.


    Jen 21, Your son is fascinating and seems wise beyond his years. I work with young children and it's rare to find one who wants to just sit and think for awhile.
     

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