If brain scans can read memories

Discussion in 'SCIENTIFIC and ANECDOTAL research' started by Phoenix, Mar 13, 2009.

  1. Phoenix

    Phoenix Forgot to play nice

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    Can it be long before scientists can verify the difference between a PL memory and imagination by using technology? And perhaps one day, science can catch up to the point where memories can be displayed/stored/replayed, which is something that would provide an excellent form of empirical data for scientists to chew over.

    https://www.livescience.com/3392-brain-scans-read-memories.html

    Phoenix
     
  2. Alexnovo

    Alexnovo Senior Registered

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    Phoenix, thanks for posting this article. Very interesting. I would be interested if there are differences in the patterns between times when the person is imagining a virtual reality and when they are creating a fantasy of their own. After reading the article I have more questions than answers, but it is very interesting.

    I get where you are coming from here, but there is a part of me that imagines an Orwellian future if this type of technology is developed.
     
  3. Florence

    Florence Senior Registered

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    I don't want to be a wet blanket....but....I think it's a horrible idea.


    Why does a person have to remember every little detail in the first place. We are supposed to be in the "NOW" not stuck in the past. When remembering starts to become a yearning for a past life....to me....that's not healthy


    You know in your heart that the minute they can get into a person's brain, they will start trying to make changes in those memories. Science always wants to go too far. People are already able, with the help of a specialist, to discover the reason they might have a particular problem and get some relief..... As far as I'm concerned, that's good enough..
     
  4. Zengirl

    Zengirl New Member

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    I'm with you on this Florence! VERY bad idea. Anytime science invents something it is first used as a weapon. Only much later does it find usefulness in the private sector. The last place you want the government is inside your mind! :eek:


    However in a perfect world....it would be great to download everyone's memories to 're-write' history the way it was REALLY lived! ;) Wow, wouldn't that be a racy novel!


    ~Zengirl
     
  5. tanguerra

    tanguerra Moderator Emeritus

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    I don't think it's a horrible idea. I think it is a step in the right direction. Hurrah Phoenix! Let me explain.


    1/ If people really believed in reincarnation (really, truly) they would be more relaxed and better behaved. Take away the fear of death and insert the certain knowledge that you will reap what you sow in the next life and watch what happens, I say! Can't see it? Contrast the oceanic calm and serenity of the trained Buddhist monk with the usual carryings on of most people in Western society - with their short term outlooks, greed, aggression and desire for too many shoes. Yes, some of it is meditation, discipline and a stress free(ish) life. The rest of it is the knowledge that this life is not 'all there is'. Imagine if everyone 'got it'. (You may say I'm a dreamer.....)


    2/ How are we to arrive at this happy state of affairs? The only way to convince a typical 'modern' person is with scientific fact. Reincarnation is not believed, because it cannot be scientifically proven (according to some people's definitions of proof of course). It is considered a curiosity, alongside Tarot cards, crystal balls and ouija boards in the popular imagination. Sad, but true.


    3/ How are we (typical 'modern' society) to sort the charlatans, the deluded and the 'wannabees' from the 'chaff' of actual, sincere, meaningful experience and really start to consider it deeply and seriously as it should be considered?


    Certainly, Florence, we few 'initiates' understand the difference, and it's not news to the Buddhists, but what about a mass understanding? How do you really convince people in these modern days? With a machine that goes beep! of course. :laugh:

    4/ All new technology can be used for 'evil' and also for 'good'. Humans have been having this discussion since the invention of fire! (I know, I was around then! :) )
     
  6. Sunniva

    Sunniva Administrator Emeritus

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    I agree with you completely, Tanguerra! :)

    Unfortunately, I think, that when it comes to reincarnation it is such a difficult concept to grasp for many people (partially because there are more questions than answers), so I don't think that even the machine that goes beep would do the trick of convincing them. Would the machine be able to explain how and why we store memories, from a scientific point of view? These are question even I, a believer and experiencer (is that a word?? :tongue:: angel), would like to know the answer to, with logical, rational and objective arguments, cleansed of religious undertones. Imo, until the science of reincarnation is secularized, there will be no progress in convincing people of it's reality.
     
  7. Alexnovo

    Alexnovo Senior Registered

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    Here here!, Sunniva I could not agree with you more on this point. Too many of those who discover actual evidence of reincarnation publish that evidence together with their own spiritual, philosophical and/or theological views. I think it is perfectly understandable from a personal point of view. Many, if not most, of us that believe reincarnation is real are searching for that deeper meaning behind it, and these writers are no different. However, when an author publishes his/her findings regarding a particular case and then along side those finding publishes his/her own views of how the cosmos functions, he/she is making it less likely that the scientific community and the non-believing public will accept the findings themselves. Once again, I am not criticizing these writers for doing what they are doing (I read many of their works and agree with much of what they have to say), but if we want the scientific community to take reincarnation research seriously we are going to need more researchers to publish what the facts are and leave the spiritual implications out.
     

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