Mannerisms and things children say

Discussion in 'Children's Past Lives -Age 7 & under' started by Deborah, Sep 1, 2008.

  1. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    MANNERISMS:

    Recently I went out to lunch with my daughter and her son - who just turned two years old. At the table my grandson picked up a napkin and began cleaning his hands. He carefully went between each finger and the back of the hands, the palm and then again. This went on for at least three minutes. Of course I was amazed and asked my daughter how long he had been doing that and commented that most kids hate to wash their hands or barely do so. She laughed and said he hates dirty hands and is obsessed with cleaning them.

    I of course wondered what his past life might have been that would make him be so diligent about clean hands and my first thought was "I wonder what happened." Great-grandma is very clairvoyant and when I told her about this she began to ask me to ask him what happened. Then she said "Oh my - he was a surgeon, his hands had to be clean."

    Needless to say I intend on buying him a toy doctor kit - just to see how he handles it. It is also interesting to note that my daughter is going back to school to be a nurse and in a conversation with her a year ago - she said "One of my boys better get a law degree or become a doctor!" Which of course makes me wonder if this is what drew him to her. :cool


    THINGS CHILDREN SAY:

    When my son was seven (he is now 23), I went along on a school field trip with him and 30 of his classmates. At lunch time, the children all sat on the picnic benches eating their lunches. I had finished mine and was just sitting near by .... listening to them talk. A little boy got up from the table and yelled to his friend at the other end. He said - "Come on Brian....let's go play. We have our lives to live all over again."

    Needless to say - I was speechless...and could hardly believe what I had just heard. Yet , there was no doubt - it was as clear as day.

    Does anyone else have mannerisms they have noticed from their children or heard them say little things that make you wonder?
     
  2. alaskanlaughter

    alaskanlaughter Senior Registered

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    What an interesting thread. Thanks for starting this one, Deb.


    My youngest, who is 2 now, has had the habit of pacing the rooms with his hands clasped a certain way, since he was first able to walk. He tilts his body forward and looks very serious and just paces up and down. My husband finally figured out why that looks familiar. It's what his grandfather used to do. Our toddler is also named after that grandfather.


    I can't wait to see what others have to say. :thumbsup:
     
  3. indigobutterfly

    indigobutterfly New Member

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    hmmm, Deborah. My son is almost 13 and I wish that I could remember better, lol. My son had the same hands thing going on as your grandson. He didn't want dirty hands at all. They were "deedee" (dirty). I don't remember enough, though. I'll watch my niece and nephews better. :D


    That is such a cool thing that you overheard!!! Wow! That's fascinating! Soo cool. I love hearing all this! I start my new job next Monday and will be around kids a lot, and driving them a lot. So, I'm keeping my ears open. I'll have lots of preschool kids, so that's exciting. :D
     
  4. vicky

    vicky Senior Member

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    My son, who is now 8, told me when he was five--'the only reason you wanted to be the mommy in this life was so that you could boss me around.'


    He also used to tell me that he helped God to choose me as his mommy so I tell him that I'm glad he chose me but I also tease him about the mommy store.


    My son also has an amazing ability with a bow and arrow and a great aim for shooting a gun. He has since he first picked up these things when he was 3. He can hit a quarter at about 75 feet away--every time. This is an enigma because both his fine motor and gross motor skills are not very good.


    It is not surprising to me that he has spoken of a past life as an indian and also as a Red Coat.


    Interesting thread Deborah. I'll be reading along to see what others have to say.
     
  5. ButterflyPsyche

    ButterflyPsyche Senior Registered

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    Deborah, I think I need to frame your son's quote! It is just too precious!


    Clairvoyance is such a blessing, I never would have thought of a surgeon, yet it could make perfect sense!


    Many people discuss how children are born with a certain temperament, but I always wonder "why", too.


    In particular, the relationship and mannerisms of my niece and nephew interest me. My niece is very independent and strong while my nephew is very cautious and can be anxious - unusual for a little sister and big brother!


    I have an older nephew whose grandfather (on his mom's side) passed away before he was born. I never really knew his grandfather as I was only 8 when he died but my SIL noticed a lot of his mannerisms- patterns of speech, a love of ketchup on everything, love of military, etc.


    It is amazing how our awareness of these "little things" can create an amazing pattern we might otherwise miss!
     
  6. wrinkle

    wrinkle New Member

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    My daughter, who I believe might be my grandmother, has a very peculiar need to hold my hands, especially before she goes to sleep. My grandmother always wanted to hold my hands whenever I was with her. Not a mannerism, but it's kind of related: my daughter is farsighted and wears glasses since babyhood which is unusual, but it isn't unusual for a 90 year old. My grandmother passed away shortly before her 92nd birthday. I can't help but wonder if my daughter somehow "carried" over the farsightedness.
     
  7. Poppies

    Poppies New Member

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    I hope you don't mind me posting this little story here as I didn't want to make a new thread out of it.


    This year (or maybe last year.. I don't have a very specific memory) my mum's side of the family got together for a lunch. We ended up at some point having a look at old photos of family members who have passed.


    Later that evening, at my Aunty's house, we were on the subject of talking about a relative who we've been searching for and somehow we got onto the subject of my grandmother. She passed a few years ago, and apparently one of my youngest cousins (who I believe is 6) has been seeing her.


    Anyway, we were talking about that and my Aunty brought up a conversation she had with my cousin while we were looking at the old photos that day. My Aunty said she had pointed out a picture of my grandmother to my cousin, whom she has never met, and explained who it was.


    My Aunty said my cousin then looked at her straight in the eye and said in a dignified voice: "I remember everything". :eek:


    Back then I never knew much about reincarnation. I've always associated it with religion and I'm not a very religious person. But thinking back now it makes me wonder....
     
  8. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    Welcome Poppies,


    It's a great example of the little things children say or do that makes us all - wonder. ;)


    Thank you for sharing!
     
  9. ButterflyPsyche

    ButterflyPsyche Senior Registered

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    Welcome, poppies!


    I love the dignified manner in which she said that!
     
  10. Poppies

    Poppies New Member

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    Thank you you both!


    My little cousin, the way she looks (as in her expression) makes her appear a lot older for her age. I don't see her very often, but she always looks quite solemn!
     
  11. ButterflyPsyche

    ButterflyPsyche Senior Registered

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    Great to see you back on! We hope to hear more about that little one!
     
  12. av&hilfan90

    av&hilfan90 New Member

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    I have pretty much raised my neighbor Joseph, who is now 4 (he'll be 5 on Halloween).


    I've known him since he was 10 months and have baby-sit him so much that he is like my little brother more than a just a neiborhood kid.


    He has done a few things to make me wonder.


    One morning over the summer he told me he was hungry. So I asked him what he wanted to eat. He replied a scone. We live in North Carolina, USA, where there aren't any scones. I asked Joseph how he knew what a scone was and he replied "I used to always eat them with my other family". I asked who was in his "other family" and he just smiled at me and ran off.


    Jospeh has also called me mommy before. At first I just thought it was because I was around more than his real mother when he was younger. I always correct him and tell him I'm Stephie or Sissy (what his mother refers to me as). Most of the time he will change it from mommy to sissy or Stephie, but one time he didn't, One time he started laughing and said "Your silly! You were my mommy before this mommy." I told him that I was never his mommy but he kept insisting that I was. He said "Yes, you were my mommy. A long time ago. We lived in a wood house and ate scones. Just you and me!". I continued to tell him that I was never his mommy but he just got frustrated and ran off to play with his little brother.
     
  13. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    Welcome to the forum Stephie,


    Thank you for sharing your story. It is a wonderful example of the little things kids say and do. I hope you enjoy reading other stories on the forum and in the archive. I look forward to reading your thoughts about various topics.
     
  14. mamakaykay

    mamakaykay Senior Registered

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    Well here something Aaliyah (2 yrs old) does that always makes me wonder...she seems to know a lot about guns for a person her age and the fact we don't condone gun violence in our home. It started around the time she turned 1. Our oldest son had a toy gun he had gotten from somewhere (I would never buy one) and she got a hold of it and the way she held it...I don't know she looked like she just knew what she was doing. Then as she got older every time she got a hold of it she would hold it out and pretend to shoot it at people and will get mad if you don't "die" (fall down). If she sees a gun on TV she will say "die?". LIke I said we don't condone gun violence and we don't have tons of guns around the house or anything so I have no idea why my 2 year old baby girl seems to know this stuff!
     
  15. Karoliina

    Karoliina Moderator Emerita

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    Wow, that's interesting, Stephie. I suggest that if he'll talk about you being her mommy before again, you tell him you believe him and maybe ask some open-ended questions about that time. It's great you're together again in this life.:thumbsup:


    Mamakaykay, it does sound like little Aaliyah has some PL knowledge of guns. Creepy. :eek: It's a good thing, though, that she doesn't seem to be bothered by them, so there's probably no big trauma behind her possible gun memories.


    Karoliina
     
  16. av&hilfan90

    av&hilfan90 New Member

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    When my best friend, Brittany, started Kindergraton she had an African-American teacher. Her mother recalls that she was scared of her and claimed "that ne-ne gonna get me!" (ne-ne was what she called black people). She had no reason to be afraid or scared of the woman, who was a family friend of her mothers. Brittany cried and screamed on the first day of school because she was scared of the teacher. Her mother kept reassuring her that everything was fine and she wouldn't hurt her. Brittany amazed her mother then by saying "Slaves are bad mommy. They get together and kill the white men, like my other daddy." Brittany was only 5 and wouldn't know anything about slaves. Brittany's mom explained to her that the teacher wasn't a slave and that she wasn't going to kill anybody. Brittany refused to believe it and cried so much that her mom had to take her home. She finally convinced her that the woman wouldn't kill anybody. After that day Brittany never said anything else like that. When her mom and dad asked her about it she just shrugged her shoulders and wouldn't answer them.
     
  17. McDebra

    McDebra New Member

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    I think the last post I made here was about 20 monthes ago. That was the time we wer expecting my grandson and I was fully anticipating him being a reincarnation of my stepfather.


    Lately he has began to talk and he astounds me with his vocabulary on a daily basis.


    We live in the south in th USA. Everyone around calls cola drinks "coca-cola". The other day we were in the kitchen and he says, "I wanna drink"offer him milk. "No!"he says. Juice, I then offer."No! I want pop!"


    He gets no cola at home or at the sitters or here. So, I think he wants his Papa (his grandad). I tell him Papa is at work. He jumps up and down in frustration and points to some 2 liter cola bottles in the kitchen and says. I want pop!"


    NO ONE calls cola pop here! and neither did my stepfather...:confused:


    Another thing he did the other day. He was stroking my arm and he stopped and examined a rough place on my arm..


    After examination he states, " It's a wart", very matter of fact.


    That is not a term a 20 month old uses on a day to day basis.


    A boo-boo maybe, but not a wart! We asked him a day or to later and he says "It's a wart." OK, intelligence may explain the wart thing, but not the pop thing.
     
  18. Val

    Val Member

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    The "pop" reference is intrigueing. Here in the Northwest coke, and all similar carbonated drinks, are usually referred to as pop. My husbands family (from the Midwest) always called it soda.
     
  19. soulfreindly

    soulfreindly Senior Registered

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    Interesting McDebra... love it when this happens.


    The word pop was first used in 1861 http://inventors.about.com/library/weekly/aa091699.htm


    TO try and get a time line of his past life you could ask him some questions particular to pop, like "Do you like pop in cans or in bottles.?" The first cans were used in 1957 .. It sounds like it was a favourite of his anyways back then.. I wonder which kind was his favourite. ?? == ginger ale= 1851, Root beer= 1876 , Dr Pepper = 1885, Coca cola = 1886. Pepsi Cola - 1898, 7-up=1929


    THe wart -- you could ask if he worries about them--ie did he have them?? ...Warts way back may have been a stronger sign that something was wrong???? or was he a doctor who treated them and was not so worried about them --


    soulfreindly
     
  20. alaskanlaughter

    alaskanlaughter Senior Registered

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    How interesting to see the history of pop! LOL I LOVE Coca-Cola Santas and Christmas things, by the way. ;)


    I know my parents call it pop, especially my mom. She grew up in Michigan. I've always called it soda, but I don't know why. I've also had people tell me I talk with an Eastern United States accent, although I was born and raised in Alaska.


    I love regional "quirks" like the way we call things. It's fascinating.
     
  21. Florence

    Florence Senior Registered

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    My eldest daughter was extremely verbal at a very young age. She could hold a convrsation on the phone at 18 months. By 7 years she was reading on a 12 year old level. Then....came Scott. Not a word out of him...always preoccupied with things....not people. By the time he was 2 1/2 he said Hi, Bye, Babo (bottle) Mama and Dada...My mother thought and suggested there was something wrong with him. I said No, I have seen him play and think about a problem and solve it.


    Then Scott turned 3... My neighbor came over to call and he was sitting playing at the picnic table. She sad "Where is your mom?" He answered "to the store she is going" or it could be "to the store she went" We all thought it was so funny and we enjoyed his speech so much, we neve corrected him at all. He talked like that for about 6 months and then gradually it faded away. My neighbor used to engage him in conversations just to hear him talk. Later in school, his IQ tested at 149...so he surely was not mentally defected. Later in life he became a CEO of a International Sunroof Company that was home based in Holland


    When Scott was in his late teens he wrote tons of poetry and short stories. Many were quite sad. He had me read a story about a man named McTavish or something. It was quite a "different name" I asked him where he got the name and he said "I don't know....it just came to me"


    Foreward 10 years....Scott is being regressed and relates that he is an Public speaker in Scotland back several hundred years ago. Something happened and he was thrown out or whatever...He begins drinking and at this moment in the regression is drunk and lying in a watery ditch. He is freezing cold and shivering uncontrolably. No matter what the hypnotist suggests....he cannot warm up. When Scott is asked his name ...it's The McTavish fellow. I think it scared Scott because he never went back again.


    Maybe it was karmic....but after Scott started speaking normally we discovered he lisped, had tongue thrust and sometimes stuttered. I had to have him watch himself speak in a mirror to help cure the tongue thrust and lisp. The stuttering, I just said "take your time, I'm right here and I'll wait for you to slow down a little" It seemed to work,,,when he started school most of the problems were solved.


    After the regression...I wondered what a public speaker had done to have such trouble in his next life with speech????
     
  22. Florence

    Florence Senior Registered

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    Hi again.....I forgot to say....I'm in Michigan and I say "POP"...but a friend of mine brought up down south in Ark. says "soda" My mother always said the two together "sodapop"


    The word apple is pronounced 3 different ways that I know of in the U.S. Apple...Aye-ple and Apper.


    I worked with some gals from different parts of the country and we all laughed over the differences in pronounciation of some words depending on where you lived....fun!!
     
  23. McDebra

    McDebra New Member

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    Thank you all for the responses. I'll keep you up to date on any other language clues I notice.:thumbsup:
     
  24. 4mysonK

    4mysonK 4mysonK

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    I guess this topic would go with mannerisms. My friend and I were talking about children doing things earlier than expected. It made me wonder if there were many physical abilities associated with past lives, as opposed to intellectual abilities.


    For example, the life my son is transfixed on seems to be one of a Chinese guard/soldier of high-rank. He's completely obsessed with being strong, fast, etc. Sometimes, he'll refuse to eat or drink anything that isn't good for you. He'll say, "No, Mom. I don't want root beer. That doesn't make you big. I want juice or milk." He tells me not to forget his vitamins, as he understands what they do for a body. Etc.


    When he was born, nurse after nurse commented on his strength. They'd say, "I can't believe this baby! He's the strongest one I've ever seen!" The day after he was born, he could hold onto your fingers and 'stand' in your lap. (Stiffen his legs. Not balance.) Literally, he was the one holding on with his little fingers, not the adult holding his weight.


    He rolled over the first week. He could stand in his crib and jump at 6 months, and just generally pull himself up and stand---just as most children do when they're learning to walk.


    The strength in his arms is amazing. Around the same time, maybe 6-months-old, he could use his hands to climb up the side of his crib or get onto the sofa, then onto the back of the sofa!


    When he began to walk really well (barely 1-year-old), I had just brought in some groceries. He was trying to help me put them away, and when I turned to look at him, he was holding 2 gallons of milk/water. One in each hand! And carrying them! (I know, I know, this sounds CRAZY, but I'm not exaggerating.) Of course, Ian was barely getting them off the ground, but he was holding them just like I would---with straight arms, letting the weight pull them down.


    For those who haven't read his story, he's 3 now. I know adults who'd do anything to have his abs. It's nuts!


    Neither of us are athletic, so I'm not sure what we're going to do. I guess I should enroll him in wushu! HA!


    Is this type of physicality common? Linked? Or is he just lucky? Hehe.


    What do you guys think?
     
  25. alaskanlaughter

    alaskanlaughter Senior Registered

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    You have a good idea there. I wonder if he would eventually enjoy or excel at Asian martial arts, or if it would repel him instead.
     
  26. Karoliina

    Karoliina Moderator Emerita

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    This is just a tiny little thing, but I thought I'd share anyway. :)


    My 2-year-old daughter Stella has recently become fascinated by owls, but in a sense that she thinks they are scary. She's always looking them up from her picture books and paying a lot of attention if there is an owl on TV or in a new book. She's not terrified in a phobic way, but is just saying the word out loud in an appalled tone, and sometimes when she wants to agitate herself, so to speak, she's talking about boogiemen, monsters - and owls coming to get her. :eek:


    However, she seemed to be genuinely afraid, when she realised there was a picture of an owl amongst other things in her new pillow case. It was not extreme, and she forgot about it when we turned the other side of the pillow case upside, where there were no owls.


    She hasn't seen anything scary linked to owls, such as some thrilling night or hunting scene of real owls, so I don't know where this fear is coming from. It might be nothing, but I thought it was interesting to find this about owls as symbols in different parts of the world:

    Source: http://www.crossroad.to/articles2/2002/carl-teichrib/8owl.htm


    So I think there is a possibility my daughter remembers owls as scary creatures/symbols from a past life in some other culture.


    Karoliina
     
  27. soulfreindly

    soulfreindly Senior Registered

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    That is interesting Karolina. An owl as an angel of death. Animals have played such a major role in our many cultures that it makes sense that we are strongly linked to memories with them.And if it was an ancient belief that emotional link is passed down . I have always got the impression from how our culture relates to owls that they do have some darker nature to them..THey seem outwardly no different than say a falcon also a bird of prey which is considered strong and romantic .


    soulfreindly
     
  28. Mirasa

    Mirasa New Member

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    My 2 year old also has an aversion to having dirty hands, He'll bring us the box of wipes so we can get one out for him when he's done eating. He use to avoid any foods that would get his hands dirty, things like mashed potatoes, mac and cheese, tuna, Jell-o etc.. Foods most kids love digging into.He eats them now, but insists on having a fork to eat with.


    Alex also likes to sort everything, he's very picky about how things are laid out.. His chicken nuggets are always arranged by shape and size, he pulls all the rough edges off his waffles, and won't touch any food that is darker than he thinks it should be (My husband over cooked the pancakes one morning, not by much they were slightly darker than normal. Alex wouldn't touch them and kept insisting they were icky and bad.)


    Another thing I noticed is he's fascinated by cars. My aunt gave him a toy tractor for his first birthday, The first thing he did was turn it over and start checking out the tires and underside. He does that with all his cars. I asked him once what he was doing and he said "I fix". He is fascinated with nascar races, and whenever we go out he points out every car, truck and bus he sees.


    He's very protective of everyone in the family and on occasion has even stepped between my husband and my 13 year old when they were fighting, holding his arms out to each person and saying "Stop. No fight! No more!"


    It's been an interesting 2 years watching him grow up. Seeing the little idiosyncrasies he has that are different from other kids his age.
     
  29. Jody

    Jody Senior Registered

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    My youngest son (who is autistic) was always trying to get into his dad's cigarettes when he was a toddler. I would not at all doubt that he was a smoker in a previous life ... :(
     
  30. Cloacina

    Cloacina Probationary

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    McDebra,


    Just to add to all the people adding where the word "pop" is popular, I thought I'd point out that I live in Kentucky, and we say pop here. "Pop" is the most common way to indiciate "soda" in the SE part of KY.
     

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