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Seeking other Romans

tanguerra

Moderator Emeritus
Hi Military,


Welcome to the forum. I hope you will find it all very interesting to take part in the discussions and share your insights.


I have one brief memory of marching into an ancient Egyptian city with the Roman army just as a regular soldier. If I had a rank it would not have been a very high one - maybe a corporal or something, whatever the Roman equivalent might have been. I remember a feeling of great pride and elation seeing our banners flying in the sun and the bright sunlight reflecting off the helmets of the soldiers all around me. This may well have been in the time of Julius Caesar when Egypt and Rome had a peaceful alliance, as I don't believe we were coming as conquerers or anything. There had certainly been no fighting on this occasion. But we were making a fine parade (and show of force) entering the city.


It is unlikely (although possible) that ancient Rome would have been your most recent incarnation. People tend to have one or two per century on average, so you have probably been busier than you think since then. There are quite a few former Romans - but the Roman civilization was quite large, easily recognisable and lasted for several thousand years so it is not so surprising really. Large numbers of people also remember other things, such as being involved in WWII in some way for instance, because large numbers of people were caught up in it.


Being 'drawn to' ancient Greece could well be an indication of at least one life in that era.

I'm not sure. I'd like to know more, but I'm somewhat afraid to know what I could have done during that time. I don't know how I would feel if I knew I was responsible for thousands of people's deaths during the Roman times...
Yes, it can be problematic to recall doing things you may not be proud of now (I know). However, there is absolutely no point in feeling guilty about something you have no control over (in this life or any other). There is often something to learn from past mistakes, after all, so there can be value in finding out more. The fact that you have this concern in fact is evidence that you have 'evolved' since then.


Yes, personality traits, interests and inclinations can indeed carry over from one life to the next. Sometimes they are more prominent than others, depending for instance on the gender in question. I have recalled many incarnations as a warrior of various sorts and although I am a pacifist vegetarian these days, I am still pretty 'butch' for a chick. I am not one of those 'pink' girls by long chalk! :)
 

Military

New Member
Thanks for your reply tanguerra :thumbsup:


This stuff is just amazing. I wish I could know more. I'm curious to know what else I have done and who I was before.


I often wonder how I would react if I had the chance to visit one of graves from a past life. Or to even see a picture of what I used to look like. How would you react if you had that chance? I think I would probably be a little freaked out at 1st. :eek:
 

tanguerra

Moderator Emeritus
Yes, it is pretty exciting. Someone or other did write about finding their own grave and said it was a strange feeling. I tried to find the thread, but could not. Someone else might be able to point you to it.


There are lots of good tips on how to do self-hypnosis in the section on 'Regression'
http://www.reincarnationforum.com/forums/faq.16/


You can also get a professional regression done. Cost is somewhere around $100 or so, but it is the most dependable method. You can also use CDs and things as well which many people do. Various ones are recommended.
 

Charles Stuart

Senior Registered
Hi Military,

I often wonder how I would react if I had the chance to visit one of graves from a past life. Or to even see a picture of what I used to look like. How would you react if you had that chance? I think I would probably be a little freaked out at 1st.
I once had the opportunity of visiting Holyrood House in Edinburgh where I saw some of Prince Charles Stuart's (whom I believe to have been in a past life) personal belongings: a lock of hair, a knife and fork... It was VERY eerie and caused me some very strange feelings. :eek: As for pictures, I've seen quite a few, such as the one here in my avatar, where there is both a picture of me then and also my second wife in this lifetime as she was then. :cool
 

Tinkerman

Executive Director
Staff member
Super Moderator
Hi Military and welcome.


I have no specific memories of that period. I do have that nagging familiarity though. While in Rome that same familiarity/comfort was prevalent and loomed in my walks.


Why are there so many Romans? Well, thinking out loud, two things come to mind. As someone mentioned above, the Roman empire was a long and enduring era. It was filled with powerful events....full of emotion, death, luxury, poverty etc... All the things that seem to trigger recall. The second thought that comes to mind, is that we, as a civilization here in America, and I'm sure other advanced societies...Europe, Australia etc... are a part of an era very reminiscent of that Roman time. Could it be the similarities are for a purpose? I wonder if the gathering of souls in such a grand scale, in such familiar circumstance, might have some big karmic meaning...


Just thinking...


Tman
 

Charles Stuart

Senior Registered
Hi Tman,


Welcome back!!!


It is a well known fact, in spiritist circles, that the US of A has MANY once Romans... :thumbsup: There is still a certain "imperialistic" prevailance, which is characteristic.


I believe there is more to what you have said than you may at first glance imagine... :rolleyes:
 

Karoliina

Moderator Emerita
Wondering if someone could help me....


This morning I had a dream (or actually I was in that in-between state, almost asleep). I felt I was in ancient Rome. I was a boy or a young man, just about to reach adulthood - turning 18 or whatever the Roman equivalent was then. I was excited, because it meant I could hold a speech in the Senate or some other institute for the first time. My father had something to do with it - either he had arranged the opportunity or then because he was the member of the Senate, I was to follow him or something like that. I remember there were round marks on the ground before the Senate where people would go to speak, and I remember I had to wait for my turn as there were other, more important people that were to speak before me.


Does anyone know if the Senate/some other insitute's membership was inherited from father to son, and/or if the son turning 18/something got to speak there for the first time then? I was obviously trying to do a research online, but with a little success. Information is so plentiful I thought I'd try first here. :)


Karoliina
 

Karoliina

Moderator Emerita
I found some interesting information that seems to somewhat validate my experience:

Not all Senators held equal status, however. Those selected by censors or other magistrates to fill seats from among the equites had no right to vote or to speak on the Senate floor. Senators earned the proper dignity and nobility to vote and speak on the floor by virtue of holding various offices such as Consul, Praetor, Aedile, etc.
Among the senators with speaking rights, a strict order defining who could speak and when was established, with a patrician always preceding a plebeian of equal rank. The speaking order was similar to that of the seating arrangement, in which the princeps senatus held the first chair, followed by the consuls, censors, praetors, aediles, tribunes and finally, the quaestors.
There were also age requirements for admission into the senate. While no written record of the actual age exists for the early Republic, the Lex Annalis clearly indicates that a Quaestor is immediately eligible for inclusion at the end of his 1 year term of office. As questors had to be 31 at election, it stands to reason, that 32 would be the minimum required age for selection for a Senate seat. Later, in the early Empire, Augustus fixed the age of entry at 25; an age which seems to have held up throughout the remainder of the Senate's history.
The Senate was the highest law-making body of ancient Rome. It was composed of the rich landowners and aristocracy. Membership in this decision-making body was based on inherited privilege, much like the British House of Lords. In reality it was more like a cross between the Canadian and British Senates in that the individual members could (eventually) be appointed, as well as inheriting their titles because they were members of ancient noble families.
There are still questions, like based on this information I'm not clear if the men that inherited their membership were to become members when they turned 25, too. And if they could speak on the floor right away then, or if they had to earn that right as well. But I was still happy to find out it was specifically the speaking on the floor that was the Big Thing, that there was a hierarchical order with the speakers, that there were age requirements for becoming a member, and that the membership was often an inherited priviledge. Yay! headbang.gif


Karoliina
 

archival

Senior Registered
Very interesting Karoliina, I am looking forward to hearing more as you find out more! Keep us posted! If you even have a hunch on an insight, I would like to hear that as well!
 

Karoliina

Moderator Emerita
Yes, Charles. It never seizes to amaze me, even if I don't doubt my experiences as much as I did in the beginning. :)


Karoliina
 

Sunniva

Administrator Emeritus
Hiya Karoliina! :)


I have a book on the Romans and it says something about what happened when young men 'grew up':


(It's in Danish, so excuse my translation :) )


"The end of childhood was celebrated by a ceremony that was very important both socially and religious: the feast of Liberalia on March 17th. On this occasion the young boys would be dressed in the Toga Virilis, the Toga of an adult man, and it marked his new status as a Roman citizen. This happened at the age of 16 or 17. With the rights and duties of the citizen it was expected that the young man now would become an individual and act independently whether he was to become a farmer, lawyer, join the army or something else.


To the young men in the Roman elite everything revolved around the honour of the family and achieving a marvelous political career. For example one could begin with prosecuting one of your families enemies or shine in some other way and through that demonstrate a strong character and the prospect of success."


When I read your post I remembered reading this passage and thought it fitted well to your description. I hope it is helpful in some way.


According to the book, the sources also describe this age (16-17) as the most dangerous period since the young men would endulge in prostitutes and alcohole, which could be fatal for the above mentioned prospect of honour and success : angel


I hope I didn't write too much...I just find this so fascinating :) I get so exited when I can contribute :laugh:


hug3.gif
 

Karoliina

Moderator Emerita
Tak, Sunniva! :)


It could very well be that this was also the case. Even if I think the speaking in front of the Senate was the point, I also felt I was coming of age and young - rather 16-17 than 25. But I don't know, as the becoming the member of the Senate also fits very well with the experience.


But thanks anyway, it was very helpful. :thumbsup: I haven't had any more "Roman experiences" since this, but if I will, I'll keep you posted.


Karoliina
 

Karoliina

Moderator Emerita
Hmmm. I just realised that a little while ago - probably just days before the above memory flash from Rome - I woke up one morning hearing the sentence "memento mori" repeating in my head. I was familiar with the expression and didn't pay much attention, even though I thought it was a bit odd. However, I had no idea it was used supposedly in ancient Rome. I found this from Wikipedia:

Memento mori is a Latin phrase that may be freely translated as "Remember that you are mortal," "Remember you will die," or "Remember your death".
In ancient Rome, the phrase is said to have been used on the occasions when a Roman general was parading through the streets of Rome during the victory celebration known as a triumph. Standing behind the victorious general was a slave, and he had the task of reminding the general that, though he was up on the peak today, tomorrow was another day. The servant did this by telling the general that he should remember that he was mortal, i.e. "Memento mori."
I wonder if these experiences are related, as they took place so close to each other in time, and in a similar way - when I was waking up, being still half asleep.


Karoliina
 

Sunniva

Administrator Emeritus
That's very interesting, Karoliina :)


Sorry, I haven't read through the whole thread and you may mention it, but have you had memories of a pl in Rome before this?


It's one of the most fascinating periods in early history I think. What interests me the most is the impact the Romans had on 'Barbaricum' (the world outside the Roman Empire) - which was just like the US has an impact on Europe today :)


I'm very curious to hear if you find out more :)
 

Karoliina

Moderator Emerita
I had a short dream a couple of years ago about witnessing a crucifixion, and I felt I was a Roman soldier, probably around Jesus's time and living in the Mediterranean area. :)


Karoliina
 

Ginger_Mandrake

Ever Confused
catseye said:
Hey Deborah,
I was killed by two drunken Roman soldiers who were making a lot of noise around my favorite horses and scaring them. I yelled at the soldiers and one picked up a rock and bashed my head in.


Not much excitement there.


catseye
Why are we all so cruel to one another? ::shakeshead::
 

Ginger_Mandrake

Ever Confused
Karoliina


That is very interesting that you woke up with that sentence in your head a few days before the memory flash. It actually seems to be a little more than coincidence, so I suppose you're being given information about this particular memory bit by bit? Maybe it was very traumatic and your subconsious wants to ease you into remembering? Hope to hear more about yours and everyone else's Roman memories!


"Memento, ****, quad cinis es et in cenerem reverentis~ Remember, oh man, from the earth you came and to the earth you shall return," -Made popular by the song Erthe Unto Erthe by the Mediaeval Baebes
 

Karoliina

Moderator Emerita
Yes, Ginger, it seems it's coming in bits and pieces. :) It will be interesting to learn more in the future. Who knows, it could be traumatic, but I haven't sensed anything like that yet. At the moment I feel like letting it come spontaneously, without really working on it.


Karoliina
 

Lights

Lights
Hi, Peach:) .


I have memories of being a Roman, living in Herculaneum with my wife and young son, along with our deaths in the eruption of Vesuvius. Rome has always rung a bell deep inside. I remember watching Roman-themed movies in my youth and havin a feeling of extreme familiarity with that world and time....this feeling was only increased when watching the HBO series "Rome".


Charles, I agree that here probably are a lot of former Romans in the US...there is definitely this feeling of "Empire" and a feeling of arrogance which can only be described as "Imperial".
 

Karoliina

Moderator Emerita
Hiya,


I haven't had any further experiences of my Roman past life, but I recently looked for more information of the things I've dreamed about and thought I'd share them here:

A senator is not an elected office either, a person could follow the cursus honorum, and after appropriately filling a number of positions, pro formata enter into the senate as a matter of birthright, as long as you came from a patrician senatorial family and you had fulfilled the obligations of your station. Sons followed fathers almost
automatically. Unless someone like a censor had something against you, you practically couldn't be kept out of the senate if you had all the right family connections. Cicero was very proud of the fact that he was elevated to the senate su anno, in his own year, that is the first year he was eligible to be elevated. Cicero's career is a perfect model for how a person should progress up the cursus honorum. Octavian on the other hand demonstrates that many of these rules were fudged over if you had connections with people in power. He became consul at age 19.
I also read from somewhere that during the Empire getting into the Senate was not very special anymore, and many people tried to actually avoid it. In this light it would seem likely I lived during the Republic, as in my dream it was clearly a very great honour to get to speak in the Senate and ascend the ladder that way.

Places for the senate were limited, though - each year, only 25 new quaestors were elected (this is in the late republic - the number, I believe, increased in the empire), meaning that only a small proportion of senatorial sons could be elected. To be elected quaestor in the first year you were eligible (initially 30, but dropping to 25 later) was a great honour indeed. Obviously, then, a large number of sons of senators would not have served as senators themselves, and
would probably have joined the equestrian order instead, although each senatorial family would try to ensure at least one member managed to get a seat, to keep up the prestige of their name.
Then, regarding being a general and getting a triumph:

Generals were always aristocrats of the senatorial class, usually consuls or ex-consuls, since they had to hold at least praetorian rank in order to be granted imperium (the right to command an army) by the Senate; during the Empire, the emperor was the sole commander-in-chief, though he frequently delegated the actual command duties to generals who were his close associates, often relatives by birth or marriage.
During the time of the Republic, the Consuls were the highest civil and military magistrates, serving as the heads of government for the Republic.There were two consuls, and they ruled together. Under the Empire, however, the Consuls were merely a figurative representative of Rome's republican heritage and held very little power and authority.
In the Roman Republic, imperator was the title assumed by certain military commanders. After an especially great victory, an army's troops in the field would proclaim their commander imperator, an acclamation necessary for a general to apply to the Senate for a triumph. After being acclaimed imperator, the victorious general had a right to use the title after his name until the time of his triumph, where he would relinquish the title as well as his imperium.
This post is already very long with many quotations, so if you're interested, further inromation of the Roman triumph can be found for example here.


I believe my name was possibly Caius or Gaius (but not the famous Gaius Julius Caesar :D ). It was a common name then, I think, but with the right sources I might be able to find the right aristocrat Caius/Gaius that lived during the (late) Republic, inherited a place in Senate and was an army general that got a triumph. Yay. headbang.gif


Do any new members have Roman memories they'd like to share?


Karoliina
 

Sunniva

Administrator Emeritus
Hiya Karoliina,


It's very interesting although I don't have any memories of these times myself. I just wanted to validate with you that Gaius was indeed a very normal name back in the days :)


Have you looked into Gaius Marius? Does that name sound familiar?


:)
 

arg

New Member
I have a fondness for Rome but no concrete memories. I have read up on the subject thoroughly so it would be easy for me to make false memories. Mainly I have vague memories of the Roman country side and crops. Which could be any number of things, I don't think I was a laborer or slave because I don't associate the crops with toil or hardship. I can only speculate that I was moderately wealthy and owned a farm. Also that I was for Rome and not against the regime. I played Rome: Total War and enjoyed it but then the expansion Barbarian Invasion came out in which the empire was in decline and you worked to rise the Barbarians to power. I couldn't bring myself to play it, for some reason the silly little game struck an odd chord. I was a little taken back by the strong emotions tied to it and the loss I felt.
 

ChrisR

Administrator
Staff member
Super Moderator
arg said:
I played Rome: Total War and enjoyed it but then the expansion Barbarian Invasion came out in which the empire was in decline and you worked to rise the Barbarians to power. I couldn't bring myself to play it, for some reason the silly little game struck an odd chord. I was a little taken back by the strong emotions tied to it and the loss I felt.
That doesn't surprise me, arg. I have this game too, and I have to disagree, contrary to being a silly game, it is a highly accurate simulation, which has even been used in a tv documentary to demonstrate Roman battlefield tactics.


I would recommend to anyone with memories of being a Roman army General, or even a soldier, to give this game a go. It may sound like a stupid idea, but it brought a reaction out of arg. It's not an easy game to play either, so it would be interesting to see how anyone with Roman battle memories took to it.
 

arg

New Member
I didn't mean to imply that the game was silly. I was just trying to illustrate how I thought it odd that a video game of all things would compel me to have such a strong emotional response. I would definitely recommend the series to anyone that is interested in ancient warfare. The new Total War(Medieval II) is incredibly realistic. Great series.
 

Sunniva

Administrator Emeritus
That's very interesting! What a great new way to get memories. I wish my computer could play games, so I could give a try :)
 

Karoliina

Moderator Emerita
It sounds like a good idea, Chris. :thumbsup: I just have a tendency to play too much if I ever start a new game... :eek:


Sunniva, I don't actually feel like reading about any particular persons before I have more information. : angel Even though with only three short experiences I've gained an amazing amount of information, I realised when researching this. :eek: But as there were actually very few generals that got the triumph during the Republic, I don't want to jump into conclusions before I'm sure it was the Republic, not the Roman Empire I lived in.


And I'm afraid that if I start reading of these Republican generals, it might affect me before further memories. a115.gif


Thanks for your interest, though. I think this past life and experiencing it has been most peculiar in many ways. *scratches head*


Karoliina
 

Blitzmiz

Blitzmiz
Roman?


My one and only past-life memory is very short and basic and relates to when I was a very small child between the ages of 2 and 4. All my very young years, I would sleep in a very awkward position with my right hand stretched all the way round my back protecting what I now know to be my kidneys. Much though my parents tried to untangle me, I always slept that way. When asked, I said I had been a lady sleeping on a bed and somebody had come behind me and hit me with something sharp and it hurt. My understanding was that I was wealthy and I "should have been protected" - quite a complex abstract concept for a 4 year old! My parents were completely bewildered. The vision I had was of being a dark-haired woman in my 20s - my hairstyle was elaborate, despite the fact I was sleeping. I was sleeping on a "bed" which appeared to be a fairly high slab or table of some sort with little covering and a solid pillow of some sort. A man with a knife appeared from behind a (red)curtain around this bed and that is all I remember. Many years later, in my teens, I watched "I Claudius" and saw a woman sleeping on a similar bed, and from that point on have believed that as a very small child (we had no television for me to have seen such scenes) I was remembering a previous death from Roman times. I wish I could remember more!!
 

Sunniva

Administrator Emeritus
Hello Blitzmiss and welcome to the forum :)


Thank you for sharing your experience - it sounds very likely that it was a past life memory. It's very interesting.


If you have a desire to learn more about your past lives check out the 'reincarnation questions'-section, which has some really good threads and stickys (I would link directly to them, but my computer won't let me for some reason). Feel free to ask questions and jump into discussions at any time :)


Hope you enjoy :)


Sunniva
 

Karoliina

Moderator Emerita
Welcome to the forum, Blitzmiz (a fellow Roman, lol), and thanks for sharing! :)


It was very interesting and sounds definitely like a past life trauma you had as a child. You say you wish you could remember more. Maybe you can. ;) Read through the FAQ and Past Life Regression section.


Keep us posted!


Karoliina


PS: Edinburgh (Scotland) is one of my favourite cities in this life, and I believe I've had one or two past lives there, too. :D
 
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